Family RoomTraditional Landscape, San Francisco

Photography: @ Shades of Green

Inspiration for a traditional front yard landscaping in San Francisco. —  Houzz
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This photo has 5 questions
isamenton wrote:Aug 7, 2012
pnortham wrote:Dec 20, 2013
  • Brian

    Can anyone confirm the name of the white/yellow bulb like plants behind the labs ear?

  • PRO
    Dig Your Garden Landscape Design

    @Brian, it is Green Santolina - Santolina rosmarinifolia. Wonderful low-water shrub.

carolw wrote:Apr 3, 2011
  • Sheila Schmitz
    Beautiful! Lamb's Ears spread quickly, so each of these clumps may have begun with just one or two plants each. I wouldn't plant this many together at once, but you won't have to wait long to get this look. If you want even speedier results (and don't mind thinning later), plant 2-3 per clump and sprinkle some seeds around them. There are many plants with soft gray leaves that go by the name Lamb's Ears, so check the tag for more info. Many of them have beautiful flowers; some can be invasive (including my favorite, Rose Campion, aka Lychnis).
  • mousemaker
    Lamb's ears...I have them too and they are fun and fuzzy, but they are a beast to separate!! only a shovel will do!! :)
    one note about Gertrude Jekyll. I read that she banned "love lies bleeding" so I got some :) and I love it! it's taller than I expected but it's beautiful and creepy at the same time.
panda1570 wrote:Mar 17, 2013
georgetown wrote:Dec 1, 2010
  • PRO
    KitchenLab Interiors
    I'm thinking bluestone or gray slate, but I'll defer to Becky.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to Your Summer Watering Guide for Happy and Healthy PlantsJun 20, 2018

3. Know your plant types, even just generally. Having an overall sense of which plants in your yard need more water than others can help prioritize water use in the landscape and ensure plants are getting as much or as little water as they need to thrive. Not all plants require additional summer water; some even prefer keeping their toes dry in the hottest months of the year. Depending on where they’re from, native plants — particularly those from the Southwest, Texas and California — are well-adapted to dry summers and do not require supplemental summer water. (Some natives do appreciate a drink in a heatwave, though).Grouping plants in the landscape based on water requirements (low-water, moderate and high-water) can streamline irrigation.

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to 10 Top Trees to Grow in ContainersMar 26, 2018

1. CitrusCitrus of all kinds — most commonly lemons, limes, kumquats, oranges and tangerines — can be grown in large containers and make pretty accents on patios, in herb gardens or tucked into a garden bed. All citrus plants are frost-tender; in cold climates, plan on bringing the trees inside to a sunny window or greenhouse. If citrus leaves begin to yellow or drop, it’s most likely a sign of nitrogen deficiency. Supplement watering with a weekly or bimonthly feeding of diluted organic fertilizer during the growing period to set up container-grown citrus for success. Where it will grow: Hardy to 25 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 3.9 degrees Celsius (USDA zones 9 to 11; find your zone); in colder areas, plan on bringing the container indoors over winterWater requirement: ModerateLight requirement: Full sun Mature size: Varies by species; dwarf citrus trees are particularly well-suited for containersShop for pots and planters on Houzz

mariannel
Marianne Lipanovich added this to Soft, Silvery Lamb’s Ears Are a Garden FavoriteApr 17, 2017

Planting notes. Choose a sunny spot with slightly acidic soil (6.0 to 6.5 pH) to slightly alkaline soil (7.0 to 7.8 pH) that drains well. Provide partial shade in areas with extremely hot summers. Set plants about 1 foot to 2 feet apart. Add mulch around the plants to conserve water and keep the low-growing leaves off the ground. Water when the soil has dried out. Deadhead spikes if you want to prevent reseeding. Clean out any brown or shredded foliage periodically and cut down flower stalks after they finish blooming. Divide in spring or fall when the center develops a bare spot, usually about every two to four years. If the plants aren’t doing well, add compost or a balanced fertilizer in spring; otherwise, they should be fine.Lamb’s ears may be subject to rot if the soil is too wet. It also may be bothered by powdery mildew and snails.MoreHow to Create a Cottage-Style GardenDiscover more great design plants on Houzz

noellejohnson
Noelle Johnson Landscape Consulting added this to There’s a Lot to Love About a Meyer Lemon TreeMar 2, 2017

How to use it. The lush green foliage and golden yellow fruit add welcome beauty to the landscape. A Meyer lemon tree can be grown as a large shrub or trained into a small tree. When trained as a small tree, this lemon hybrid makes a great patio tree or can even be used in a courtyard. Plant herbs, such as basil, rosemary or sage, alongside it for a deliciously fragrant arrangement and a combination that can be used in cooking.Use it as an informal hedge for privacy, by allowing it to grow as a large shrub. Meyer lemon trees, like most citrus, also make nice container plants and can be brought inside during winter in colder climates.

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to 10 Ideas for a Front-Yard Edible Garden Your Neighbors Will LoveFeb 22, 2016

6. Add a dwarf fruit tree. You don’t need room for an orchard to harvest fresh fruit from your own tree. Dwarf fruit trees will stay small when planted in the ground, but they can also be planted in large pots or espaliered against a fence if you are very short on space. Seek out knowledgeable staffers at a local nursery to get advice on the best varieties for your climate.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lindaljlewis
lindaljlewis added this to INSPIRATIONMay 29, 2019

Container friendly trees - Lemons, Limes and Kumquats.

margielynnj
M J added this to outsideMay 29, 2019

. Citrus Citrus of all kinds — most commonly lemons, limes, kumquats, oranges and tangerines — can be grown in large containers and make pretty accents on patios, in herb gardens or tucked into a garden bed. All citrus plants are frost-tender; in cold climates, plan on bringing the trees inside to a sunny window or greenhouse. If citrus leaves begin to yellow or drop, it’s most likely a sign of nitrogen deficiency. Supplement watering with a weekly or bimonthly feeding of diluted organic fertilizer during the growing period to set up container-grown citrus for success. Where it will grow: Hardy to 25 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 3.9 degrees Celsius (USDA zones 9 to 11; find your zone); in colder areas, plan on bringing the container indoors over winter Water requirement: Moderate Light requirement: Full sun Mature size: Varies by species; dwarf citrus trees a

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