Garden ScenesFarmhouse Landscape, Seattle

Floret cutting garden. Mt. Vernon, WA. Photo by Floret

Design ideas for a farmhouse landscaping in Seattle. —  Houzz
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

aislin_gibson
Aislin Gibson added this to Scents and Sensibility: The Aromatherapy GardenMay 11, 2017

In her article “An Environmental Approach to Positive Emotion: Flowers,” Haviland-Jones writes: “Flowers have immediate and long-term effects on emotional reactions, mood, social behaviors and even memory for both males and females.” She notes that fragrant flowers such as these can be powerful mood boosters:Bitter orangeFreesiaHeliotropePeonyRoseSweet pea (choose heirloom varieties, which have a more potent fragrance)For an easy climbing rose, try Sally Holmes

sheilaschmitz
Sheila Schmitz added this to How to Start a Cut Flower Garden for Beautiful Bouquets All YearFeb 17, 2017

‘Sangria’ dahlias grow near a movable chicken coop at Floret, which Benzakein owns with her husband, Chris.Know your last spring and first autumn frost dates. Before you go crazy sowing seeds in late winter and early spring, it’s important to know just how early you can start — if in doubt, ask your local Master Gardener group or staff at a trusted nursery for the expected last frost date. Fast-growing annuals that bloom in summer (those that take less than 90 days to harvest, such as cosmos, sunflowers and zinnias — the number of days to harvest is indicated on seed packets) shouldn’t be started more than four to six weeks before the last spring frost, otherwise they’ll get too big for their growing container and have soft, weak foliage and overgrown roots. On the other hand, slow-growing plants like perennials can take a couple of weeks to germinate, so sow them indoors 10 to 12 weeks before the last spring frost date. Once you know your last frost date, check the back of each seed packet for days-to-harvest to figure out how many weeks early you can get them started indoors.For the most part, if you want to sow successive crops after the weather has warmed in spring, you can plant until midsummer (or even early autumn in the mildest climates) in order to give them enough time to mature.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

gcutting24
Grant Cutting added this to FlowersMay 25, 2017

In her article “An Environmental Approach to Positive Emotion: Flowers,” Haviland-Jones writes: “Flowers have immediate and long-term effects on emotional reactions, mood, social behaviors and even memory for both males and females.” She notes that fragrant flowers such as these can be powerful mood boosters: Bitter orange Freesia Heliotrope Peony Rose Sweet pea (choose heirloom varieties, which have a more potent fragrance)

kimyoder88
kimyoder88 added this to Garden IdeasMay 23, 2017

All pink, peach, orange and red

diallen
Dianna Allen added this to Cut Flower GardenMar 12, 2017

‘Sangria’ dahlias grow near a movable chicken coop at Floret, which Benzakein owns with her husband, Chris. Know your last spring and first autumn frost dates. Before you go crazy sowing seeds in late winter and early spring, it’s important to know just how early you can start — if in doubt, ask your local Master Gardener group or staff at a trusted nursery for the expected last frost date. Fast-growing annuals that bloom in summer (those that take less than 90 days to harvest, such as cosmos, sunflowers and zinnias — the number of days to harvest is indicated on seed packets) shouldn’t be started more than four to six weeks before the last spring frost, otherwise they’ll get too big for their growing container and have soft, weak foliage and overgrown roots. On the other hand, slow-growing plants like perennials can take a couple of weeks to germinate, so sow them indoors 10 to 12 weeks before the last spring frost date. Once you know your last frost date, check the back of each seed packet for days-to-harvest to figure out how many weeks early you can get them started indoors. For the most part, if you want to sow successive crops after the weather has warmed in spring, you can plant until midsummer (or even early autumn in the mildest climates) in order to give them enough time to mature.

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