Garden TourEclectic , Philadelphia

Allenaim Photography

Home design - eclectic home design idea in Philadelphia —  Houzz
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This photo has 1 question
minjeeah wrote:Aug 16, 2015
  • PRO
    Amy Renea

    I am not sure of the exact variety, as this was in a garden tour I photographed -- but is some looseleaf and was photographed in mid-summer. Sorry I don't have a better answer than that! :)

  • minjeeah

    So is it even lettuce???

    Amy Renea??

What Houzz contributors are saying:

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to California Gardener’s February ChecklistJan 16, 2018

4. Watch for snails and slugs. Warm, moist weather provides an ideal habitat for garden pests like snails and slugs. Set out bait, like pet-safe Sluggo, as soon as you spot the telltale silvery trails or holes in leaves.

mariannel
Marianne Lipanovich added this to When to Pick: A Guide to Harvesting VegetablesSep 6, 2016

Lettuce. You can start harvesting lettuce the minute the leaves are big enough to use. The more you harvest, the longer your crop will last. For varieties like butterhead and iceberg, you can also wait until the heads are completely formed. No matter which approach you take, once the plants begin to form flowers, they have passed their prime and will be bitter. Learn more about growing lettuce and other salad greens.

rebeccacuttler
Abundant City added this to 12 Tips to Help You Start an Edible GardenJul 17, 2016

5. Choose easy-to-grow crops. Giant leeks, Romanesco broccoli and heirloom watermelons look gorgeous in the seed catalog, but hold off on planting them in the first few years. Instead, choose tried-and-true varieties of crops that are productive and easy to grow. Snap peas, radishes, herbs like mint and chives, salad greens, kale, tomatoes and zucchini are all classic choices — just make sure you actually like to eat them before they go into the garden. Consult a seed catalog from a local company to find the best varieties for your regional climate. 8 Surefire Vegetables and Herbs for Beginning Urban Gardeners

rebeccacuttler
Abundant City added this to 8 Surefire Vegetables and Herbs for Beginning Urban GardenersJan 31, 2016

5. Mesclun mix. The word “mesclun” comes from the Provençal word for “mixture.” In gardening terms, mesclun is a combination of seeds that are planted together to create a ready-made baby salad featuring a variety of colors, flavors and textures. The result is similar to the packaged salad mixes you can find in grocery stores, but far more fresh and exciting. Seed catalogs often have a variety of mesclun mixes to choose from, typically featuring arugula, mustard greens and lettuce. Tip: To achieve success with mescluns, sow seeds thinly (about one seed per square half-inch). Plant some each week and harvest leaves with scissors as soon as they look ready. When to plant: Plant a little mesclun every one to two weeks from early spring to early summer. In mild-winter climates, plant again from late summer to mid-fall. Water well and protect from hot temperatures. Light requirement: Full sun to partial shadeSee how to grow salad greens

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lcourtie
lcourtie added this to Raised Bed GardeningJun 17, 2019

Salad greens are another easy choice for a container. Most have very shallow roots, and putting them in a raised container, such as this old wagon, allows them to become garden highlights rather than often-overlooked low-lying plants. Mass a single type of green in one container or plant a mix. You’ll need a pot only 6 inches deep for most lettuces, lettuce blends, mesclun and microgreens; 8 inches for chicory, radicchio and spinach

bckc1964
bckc1964 added this to potted plantingsMay 22, 2019

Mass a single type of green in one container or plant a mix. You’ll need a pot only 6 inches deep for most lettuces, lettuce blends, mesclun and microgreens; 8 inches for chicory, radicchio and spinach.

margielynnj
M J added this to outsideApr 18, 2019

Salad Greens Salad greens are another easy choice for a container. Most have very shallow roots, and putting them in a raised container, such as this old wagon, allows them to become garden highlights rather than often-overlooked low-lying plants. Mass a single type of green in one container or plant a mix. You’ll need a pot only 6 inches deep for most lettuces, lettuce blends, mesclun and microgreens; 8 inches for chicory, radicchio and spinach.

rlcollis
rlcollis added this to rlcollis' ideasApr 17, 2019

Salad greens are another easy choice for a container. Most have very shallow roots, and putting them in a raised container, such as this old wagon, allows them to become garden highlights rather than often-overlooked low-lying plants. Mass a single type of green in one container or plant a mix. You’ll need a pot only 6 inches deep for most lettuces, lettuce blends, mesclun and microgreens; 8 inches for chicory, radicchio and spinach.

tasch69
tasch69 added this to tasch69's ideasApr 17, 2019

An idea for our garden - lettuce planted in an old wheel barrow

sidellen
Sidney Arndt added this to Wish ListApr 16, 2019

Love planting in our old wheel barrel - need to figure out how to water it!

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