Glencoe Residence Winter 3 landscape
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Glencoe Residence Winter 3 Landscape, Chicago

Photo by Linda Oyama Bryan
URL
http://www.gardenconsultants.com
This is an example of a landscaping in Chicago. — Houzz

This photo has 2 questions

kathieturner wrote:
what material is on the top of the stone wall? Is it limestone? but it appears dark....which I love!
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PRO
The Garden Consultants, Inc.
The coping stone is bluestone. You can see images of this project in summer at

http://gardenconsultants.com/what/suburban/glencoe/
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ktriplat wrote:
What are the trees in the background that hold their leaves?
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The Garden Consultants, Inc.
The trees in the background are all mature Oaks in the golf course beyond. Probably White Oaks, but I am not certain. The smaller Oak in the foreground is a Swamp White Oak.
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Amy Renea added this to 10 Ingredients of a Beautiful Winter Garden
1. Rock walls and paths. The chance to look at your garden in the winter allows you to see what a vital role hardscaping plays in the overall backbone of your garden. These beautiful stone walls give a classic sunken courtyard feeling to this garden, framing the views beyond.
Jocelyn H. Chilvers added this to Rocky Mountain Gardener's December Checklist
Create outdoor decor that will carry beyond the holidays by using cuttings from your garden. Mix evergreen boughs, brightly colored branches, berries, pinecones and seed heads for potted arrangements, wreaths and swags. Not enough variety of materials to choose from in your own garden? Plan a cuttings exchange party with a friend or two.6 Branches and Berries to Spruce Up Holiday Decor
Laura Gaskill added this to 9 Tips for Selling Your House in Winter
7. Use structural elements in the garden for winter interest. In the middle of winter, it can be hard to visualize a blooming garden. Large urns and planters, benches, rock walls and other garden structures will help buyers see the potential even in the snow.
Sheila Schmitz added this to Yes, You Can Enjoy Your Yard in December! Here's How
Rocky Mountains. Mix evergreen boughs, brightly colored branches, berries, pinecones and seed heads for potted arrangements, wreaths and swags for outdoor decor that will last through the holidays, suggests Colorado landscape designer Jocelyn H. Chilvers. "Not enough variety of materials to choose from in your own garden? Plan a cuttings exchange party with a friend or two."Get her Rocky Mountain December checklist
Kim Gamel added this to 5 Important Winter Tasks to Keep Container Gardens in Shape
Under a blanket of snow this landscape is at rest. However, this doesn't mean the gardener should remain idle. The following winter chores will keep your containers looking their best.
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Celebrate the Browns, Tans and Golds of Fall and Winter Gardens
Lingering leaves. Beyond grasses, there are plants that retain their dead foliage throughout the winter. For example, several oak and beech species hold on to their leaves and provide added color and structural interest higher up in the garden. Consider how such leaf-lingering trees might frame a distant view or grace a walkway. Swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor) adds interest in the foreground of the Chicago garden seen here, connecting the landscape with the mature oaks on the golf course beyond.
Erin Carlyle added this to Freeze-Dried Clothes? Houzzers Share Their Winter Laundry Tales
Outdoors all year. A few Houzz readers commented that they have air-dried laundry outside in freezing temperatures. “We used ‘freeze dry’ when I was a child,” tsudhonimh wrote. “Things hung on the line would freeze and the ice evaporated because the air was so dry (sublimated, really). Bring in stiff levis and lean them against the wall until they thawed and collapsed. They were barely damp and ready to iron. It only takes a bit of dryer time afterward.”Similarly, reader Patti Genack found that line-freezing worked for her. “Clothes do dry outside in the winter. They freeze and move like cardboard in the wind, but when they are dry they move like fabric again,” Genack commented. “The freezing and drying actually makes the clothes soft.”More Homeowner’s Workbook: How to Remodel the Laundry RoomSee a $400 laundry room update with sweater-drying racksBrowse more laundry room design ideas

What Houzzers are commenting on:

amyara added this to Gardens
10 Ingredients of a Beautiful Winter Garden
Kaaren Baumgartner added this to OUTDOORS
Great winter look using grasses.
Dianne Glennie added this to Porch
I like the height of the stone wall and that the top is darker (slate??)

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