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House Single Storey Contemporary

Wellfleet Modern House - Exterior
Wellfleet Modern House - Exterior
ZeroEnergy Design
This modern green home offers both a vacation destination on Cape Cod near local family members and an opportunity for rental income. FAMILY ROOTS. A West Coast couple living in the San Francisco Bay Area sought a permanent East Coast vacation home near family members living on Cape Cod. As academic professionals focused on sustainability, they sought a green, energy efficient home that was well-aligned with their values. With no green homes available for sale on Cape Cod, they decided to purchase land near their family and build their own. SLOPED SITE. Comprised of a 3/4 acre lot nestled in the pines, the steeply sloping terrain called for a plan that embraced and took advantage of the slope. Of equal priority was optimizing solar exposure, preserving privacy from abutters, and creating outdoor living space. The design accomplished these goals with a simple, rectilinear form, offering living space on the both entry and lower/basement levels. The stepped foundation allows for a walk-out basement level with light-filled living space on the down-hill side of the home. The traditional basement on the eastern, up-hill side houses mechanical equipment and a home gym. The house welcomes natural light throughout, captures views of the forest, and delivers entertainment space that connects indoor living space to outdoor deck and dining patio. MODERN VISION. The clean building form and uncomplicated finishes pay homage to the modern architectural legacy on the outer Cape. Durable and economical fiber cement panels, fixed with aluminum channels, clad the primary form. Cedar clapboards provide a visual accent at the south-facing living room, which extends a single roof plane to cover the entry porch. SMART USE OF SPACE. On the entry level, the “L”-shaped living, dining, and kitchen space connects to the exterior living, dining, and grilling spaces to effectively double the home’s summertime entertainment area. Placed at the western end of the entry level (where it can retain privacy but still claim expansive downhill views) is the master suite with a built-in study. The lower level has two guest bedrooms, a second full bathroom, and laundry. The flexibility of the space—crucial in a house with a modest footprint—emerges in one of the guest bedrooms, which doubles as home office by opening the barn-style double doors to connect it to the bright, airy open stair leading up to the entry level. Thoughtful design, generous ceiling heights and large windows transform the modest 1,100 sf* footprint into a well-lit, spacious home. *(total finished space is 1800 sf) RENTAL INCOME. The property works for its owners by netting rental income when the owners are home in San Francisco. The house especially caters to vacationers bound for nearby Mayo Beach and includes an outdoor shower adjacent to the lower level entry door. In contrast to the bare bones cottages that are typically available on the Cape, this home offers prospective tenants a modern aesthetic, paired with luxurious and green features. Durable finishes inside and out will ensure longevity with the heavier use that comes with a rental property. COMFORT YEAR-ROUND. The home is super-insulated and air-tight, with mechanical ventilation to provide continuous fresh air from the outside. High performance triple-paned windows complement the building enclosure and maximize passive solar gain while ensuring a warm, draft-free winter, even when sitting close to the glass. A properly sized air source heat pump offers efficient heating & cooling, and includes a carefully designed the duct distribution system to provide even comfort throughout the house. The super-insulated envelope allows us to significantly reduce the equipment capacity, duct size, and airflow quantities, while maintaining unparalleled thermal comfort. ENERGY EFFICIENT. The building’s shell and mechanical systems play instrumental roles in the home’s exceptional performance. The building enclosure reduces the most significant energy glutton: heating. Continuous super-insulation, thorough air sealing, triple-pane windows, and passive solar gain work together to yield a miniscule heating load. All active energy consumers are extremely efficient: an air source heat pump for heating and cooling, a heat pump hot water heater, LED lighting, energy recovery ventilation (ERV), and high efficiency appliances. The result is a home that uses 70% less energy than a similar new home built to code requirements. OVERALL. The home embodies the owners’ goals and values while comprehensively enabling thermal comfort, energy efficiency, a vacation respite, and supplementary income. PROJECT TEAM ZeroEnergy Design - Architect & Mechanical Designer A.F. Hultin & Co. - Contractor Pamet Valley Landscape Design - Landscape & Masonry Lisa Finch - Original Artwork European Architectural Supply - Windows Eric Roth Photography - Photography
Dandelion House by Jennifer Ott Design
Dandelion House by Jennifer Ott Design
Loop Design
Remodel of a two-story residence in the heart of South Austin. The entire first floor was opened up and the kitchen enlarged and upgraded to meet the demands of the homeowners who love to cook and entertain. The upstairs master bathroom was also completely renovated and features a large, luxurious walk-in shower. Jennifer Ott Design • http://jenottdesign.com/ Photography by Atelier Wong
Island Passive House
Island Passive House
The Artisans Group, Inc.
This prefabricated 1,800 square foot Certified Passive House is designed and built by The Artisans Group, located in the rugged central highlands of Shaw Island, in the San Juan Islands. It is the first Certified Passive House in the San Juans, and the fourth in Washington State. The home was built for $330 per square foot, while construction costs for residential projects in the San Juan market often exceed $600 per square foot. Passive House measures did not increase this projects’ cost of construction. The clients are retired teachers, and desired a low-maintenance, cost-effective, energy-efficient house in which they could age in place; a restful shelter from clutter, stress and over-stimulation. The circular floor plan centers on the prefabricated pod. Radiating from the pod, cabinetry and a minimum of walls defines functions, with a series of sliding and concealable doors providing flexible privacy to the peripheral spaces. The interior palette consists of wind fallen light maple floors, locally made FSC certified cabinets, stainless steel hardware and neutral tiles in black, gray and white. The exterior materials are painted concrete fiberboard lap siding, Ipe wood slats and galvanized metal. The home sits in stunning contrast to its natural environment with no formal landscaping. Photo Credit: Art Gray
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Lochwood-Lozier Custom Home in Kenwood Park
Lochwood-Lozier Custom Home in Kenwood Park
Lochwood-Lozier Custom Homes
By Lochwood-Lozier Custom Homes
Large trendy brown three-story stucco exterior home photo in Seattle
Treetops House
Treetops House
Specht Architects
Treetops House The Treetops House is a renovation and major expansion of a 1955 suburban ranch house. The project presented some interesting questions of preservation vs change, as well as a compelling story of dealing with a challenging (and ultimately rewarding) site. The original house was very typical for its time and place—a sprawling single-story, fairly nondescript affair that had small windows, and was clad entirely in Texas limestone. Our challenge was to turn this into a modern house that was open, bright, and inviting, while not completely obliterating all traces of what had existed before. Part of our philosophy is that elements of the history of a place be retained and incorporated into any new design. There are characteristics of almost any design, regardless of how banal, that embody memories and a sense of neighborhood. We feel that preserving these adds depth to any new intervention. With the Treetops House, we largely maintained the entire limestone perimeter wall, and used it as a heavy plinth on which a new second level was added. The new upper level features large frameless glass windows and is filled with light. The interior was opened up to create double-height spaces that bring this light from above and into the center of the house. The new composition is one which is clearly of its time, but also respects and reflects the time and place in which the original house was created. The house is on a site that straddles a fault in the limestone base strata below. Water continuously flows up through this fault and flows out onto the property. The original 1955 house featured a foundation with extremely deep concrete piers that allowed the house to bear on more stable strata far below the surface. Given that building new piers was cost-prohibitive, we did not expand the house’s footprint at all, but cantilevered the new second level out from the existing structure. This strategy not only allowed for the house to be within budget, but also gave it a distinctive dynamic expression. The different materials and profiles of the first and second floors emphasize the house’s horizontality and create another kind stratum that is visual and expressive. Inside the house, a double-height entry hall features stairs that lead up to the second-level main living space. The perimeter of this space is made up of frameless glass is set atop a continuous planter wall that provides a green foreground to the treescape beyond. Large overhangs provide shade at all times of the day, and the surrounding cladding of charred cypress prevents glare and adds a textural counterpoint. Other features include a large kitchen with countertop-height serving windows that open out onto a pool terrace and entertaining area, as well as unique built-in storage and display elements.Landscaping is entirely comprised of native grasses and other low-maintenance plantings. Architect: Specht Architects Contractor: Spencer Construction Photography: Casey Dunn
Single Family
Single Family
Stofft Architects
Example of a trendy white two-story flat roof design in Miami
pyle
pyle
Workshop11
Photos By Shawn Lortie Photography
Inspiration for a large contemporary brown two-story mixed siding exterior home remodel in DC Metro
Treetops House
Treetops House
Specht Architects
Treetops House The Treetops House is a renovation and major expansion of a 1955 suburban ranch house. The project presented some interesting questions of preservation vs change, as well as a compelling story of dealing with a challenging (and ultimately rewarding) site. The original house was very typical for its time and place—a sprawling single-story, fairly nondescript affair that had small windows, and was clad entirely in Texas limestone. Our challenge was to turn this into a modern house that was open, bright, and inviting, while not completely obliterating all traces of what had existed before. Part of our philosophy is that elements of the history of a place be retained and incorporated into any new design. There are characteristics of almost any design, regardless of how banal, that embody memories and a sense of neighborhood. We feel that preserving these adds depth to any new intervention. With the Treetops House, we largely maintained the entire limestone perimeter wall, and used it as a heavy plinth on which a new second level was added. The new upper level features large frameless glass windows and is filled with light. The interior was opened up to create double-height spaces that bring this light from above and into the center of the house. The new composition is one which is clearly of its time, but also respects and reflects the time and place in which the original house was created. The house is on a site that straddles a fault in the limestone base strata below. Water continuously flows up through this fault and flows out onto the property. The original 1955 house featured a foundation with extremely deep concrete piers that allowed the house to bear on more stable strata far below the surface. Given that building new piers was cost-prohibitive, we did not expand the house’s footprint at all, but cantilevered the new second level out from the existing structure. This strategy not only allowed for the house to be within budget, but also gave it a distinctive dynamic expression. The different materials and profiles of the first and second floors emphasize the house’s horizontality and create another kind stratum that is visual and expressive. Inside the house, a double-height entry hall features stairs that lead up to the second-level main living space. The perimeter of this space is made up of frameless glass is set atop a continuous planter wall that provides a green foreground to the treescape beyond. Large overhangs provide shade at all times of the day, and the surrounding cladding of charred cypress prevents glare and adds a textural counterpoint. Other features include a large kitchen with countertop-height serving windows that open out onto a pool terrace and entertaining area, as well as unique built-in storage and display elements.Landscaping is entirely comprised of native grasses and other low-maintenance plantings. Architect: Specht Architects Contractor: Spencer Construction Photography: Casey Dunn
House for an Artist
House for an Artist
Andrew Mann Architecture
David Wakely
Trendy white three-story exterior home photo in San Francisco
Studio Entry
Studio Entry
LAB+ (Liang Architecture Bureau+, Inc.)
Mid-sized contemporary black one-story metal exterior home idea in Los Angeles
Yin Yang House
Yin Yang House
Brooks + Scarpa Architects
The Yin-Yang House is a net-zero energy single-family home in a quiet Venice, CA neighborhood. The design objective was to create a space for a large and growing family with several children, which would create a calm, relaxed and organized environment that emphasizes public family space. The home also serves as a place to entertain, and a welcoming space for teenagers as they seek social space with friends. The home is organized around a series of courtyards and other outdoor spaces that integrate with the interior of the house. Facing the street the house appears to be solid. However, behind the steel entry door is a courtyard, which reveals the indoor-outdoor nature of the house behind the solid exterior. From the entry courtyard, the entire space to the rear garden wall can be seen; the first clue of the home’s spatial connection between inside and out. These spaces are designed for entertainment, and the 40 foot sliding glass door to the living room enhances the harmonic relationship of the main room, allowing the owners to host many guests without the feeling of being overburdened. The tensions of the house’s exterior are subtly underscored by a 12-inch steel band that hews close to, but sometimes rises above or falls below the floor line of the second floor – a continuous loop moving inside and out like a pen that is never lifted from the page, but reinforces the intent to spatially weave together the indoors with the outside as a single space. Scale manipulation also plays a formal role in the design of the structure. From the rear, the house appears to be a single-story volume. The large master bedroom window and the outdoor steps are scaled to support this illusion. It is only when the steps are animated with people that one realizes the true scale of the house is two stories. The kitchen is the heart of the house, with an open working area that allows the owner, an accomplished chef, to converse with friends while cooking. Bedrooms are intentionally designed to be very small and simple; allowing for larger public spaces, emphasizing the family over individual domains. The breakfast room looks across an outdoor courtyard to the guest room/kids playroom, establishing a visual connection while defining the separation of uses. The children can play outdoors while under adult supervision from the dining area or the office, or do homework in the office while adults occupy the adjacent outdoor or indoor space. Many of the materials used, including the bamboo interior, composite stone and tile countertops and bathroom finishes are recycled, and reinforce the environmental DNA of the house, which also has a green roof. Blown-in cellulose insulation, radiant heating and a host of other sustainable features aids in the performance of the building’s heating and cooling. The active systems in the home include a 12 KW solar photovoltaic panel system, the largest such residential system available on the market. The solar panels also provide shade from the sun, preventing the house from becoming overheated. The owners have been in the home for over nine months and have yet to receive a power bill.
Tree House - Austin, TX
Tree House - Austin, TX
MF Architecture
Balanced shade, dappled sunlight, and tree canopy views are the basis of the 518 Sacramento Drive house design. The entry is on center with the lot’s primary Live Oak tree, and each interior space has a unique relationship to this central element. Composed of crisply-detailed, considered materials, surfaces and finishes, the home is a balance of sophistication and restraint. The two-story massing is designed to allow for a bold yet humble street presence, while each single-story wing extends through the site, forming intimate outdoor and indoor spaces. Photo: Brian Mihealsick
Glencoe, IL Exterior Remodel Ranch Style
Glencoe, IL Exterior Remodel Ranch Style
Siding & Windows Group Ltd
James Hardie HZ5 Panel and Lap Siding with ColorPlus Technology, Longboard textured panels in Light National Walnut to the overhangs on all roof line perimeter, aluminum Gutters in Black and ProVia Doors. Shingle Roofing: new architectural roofing shingles by GAF Ultra HD, color Charcoal. Flat Roof: new modified bitumen roofing system finished with Silver Oxide coating.
810 West Townhomes
810 West Townhomes
Dynia Architects
This mixed-income housing development on six acres in town is adjacent to national forest. Conservation concerns restricted building south of the creek and budgets led to efficient layouts. All of the units have decks and primary spaces facing south for sun and mountain views; an orientation reflected in the building forms. The seven detached market-rate duplexes along the creek subsidized the deed restricted two- and three-story attached duplexes along the street and west boundary which can be entered through covered access from street and courtyard. This arrangement of the units forms a courtyard and thus unifies them into a single community. The use of corrugated, galvanized metal and fiber cement board – requiring limited maintenance – references ranch and agricultural buildings. These vernacular references, combined with the arrangement of units, integrate the housing development into the fabric of the region. A.I.A. Wyoming Chapter Design Award of Citation 2008 Project Year: 2009
Indigo Lane House
Indigo Lane House
Mohler + Ghillino Architects
View of the house in the landscape. A series of indor/outdoor terraces step up the hillside to connect the indoors with the landscape. Generous doors and windows provide light, ventilation and views to the Cascade Mountains. photo: Mercio Photography
De Haro House
De Haro House
Levy Art + Architecture
Cesar Rubio
Inspiration for a mid-sized contemporary multicolored two-story mixed siding house exterior remodel in San Francisco
Glencoe, IL Exterior Remodel Ranch Style
Glencoe, IL Exterior Remodel Ranch Style
Siding & Windows Group Ltd
James Hardie HZ5 Panel and Lap Siding with ColorPlus Technology, Longboard textured panels in Light National Walnut to the overhangs on all roof line perimeter, aluminum Gutters in Black and ProVia Doors. Shingle Roofing: new architectural roofing shingles by GAF Ultra HD, color Charcoal. Flat Roof: new modified bitumen roofing system finished with Silver Oxide coating.
House By The Pond
House By The Pond
Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects
House By The Pond The overall design of the house was a direct response to an array of environmental regulations, site constraints, solar orientation and specific programmatic requirements. The strategy was to locate a two story volume that contained all of the bedrooms and baths, running north/south, along the western side of the site. An open, lofty, single story pavilion, separated by an interstitial space comprised of two large glass pivot doors, was located parallel to the street. This lower scale street front pavilion was conceived as a breezeway. It connects the light and activity of the yard and pool area to the south with the view and wildlife of the pond to the north. The exterior materials consist of anodized aluminum doors, windows and trim, cedar and cement board siding. They were selected for their low maintenance, modest cost, long-term durability, and sustainable nature. These materials were carefully detailed and installed to support these parameters. Overhangs and sunshades limit the need for summer air conditioning while allowing solar heat gain in the winter. Specific zoning, an efficient geothermal heating and cooling system, highly energy efficient glazing and an advanced building insulation system resulted in a structure that exceeded the requirements of the energy star rating system. Photo Credit: Matthew Carbone and Frank Oudeman
Corner Courtyard Residence
Corner Courtyard Residence
Wiedemann Architects LLC
Example of a mid-sized trendy gray two-story stucco exterior home design in DC Metro with a mixed material roof
Tree+House Kitchen and Dining
Tree+House Kitchen and Dining
François Lévy Architecture + Interiors
A 43” diameter heritage pecan guided the plan of this neighborhood-scaled, modestly-priced, single-story, L-shaped house. In Austin’s seemingly perpetual drought, the goal was to create a symbiotic relationship between house and tree: to complement, not combat each other. The roof’s east/west parallel ridges create a valley directly across from the base, where water is collected at a grate, nourishing the tree. The roof also maximizes south facing surfaces, elevated at 15 degrees for future solar collection. The open, public spaces of the home maximize the north-south light. The private zone of the bedrooms and bathrooms include a generous gallery; its angled walls and large sliding doors are faceted about the tree. The pecan becomes a central focus for indoor and outdoor living, participating in the house in both plan and section. The design welcomes and nurtures the tree as integral to its success. Photo Credit: Chris Diaz
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