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Example of a classic kitchen design in San Francisco with wood countertops, white cabinets and paneled appliances

KitchenTraditional Kitchen, San Francisco

Shannon Malone © 2012 Houzz

Example of a classic kitchen design in San Francisco with wood countertops, white cabinets and paneled appliances —  Houzz
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Questions About This Photo (10)
janmarie wrote:Sep 9, 2012
  • mspig98
    Just an FYI - Ikea has incredible butcher block counters. I made a bar out of one roughly 73"x 25 1/2" for only $129. When looking to have it made the cost was over $2K...Obviously not the same but pretty close. Make sure you treat it over and over with the food safe rub they sell.
  • Merisa Fink

    @mspig98 - I want a butcherblock island, and am considering ikea as a place to source. It seems like there's only one size for the island, and it's particalboard. Anyone know if I can order a solid wood slab (like available for countertops, which are not as wide) from Ikea the size of an island??

kristinhacker wrote:Sep 9, 2012
  • kristinhacker
    Good call- they do! I was thinking Skidmore but I think you're right
  • Darian Handley
    We're both right! The Willis and Skidmore are the same, except the canopy. (Willis is brass, Skidmore is porcelain).
gestell wrote:Apr 16, 2013
  • PRO
    essentials inside
    Hi gestell. I know it has been a while since you asked your question. Did you ever find the art?

    If you didn't, here is something similar:

    www.essentialsinside.com: city names wall art · More Info


    Hope that helps! (You have to click on the name under the photo to go to the Houzz page with information on the product).

    Lyvonne
carrie614 wrote:Dec 26, 2012
  • jeepdoll
    Are these cabinets custom or who makes them if they are from a manufacturer?
Monique Stevens wrote:Oct 30, 2017
    lynndwilson wrote:Sep 14, 2016
      ilovelarry wrote:Aug 10, 2014
        meghanpott wrote:Aug 16, 2013

          What Houzz contributors are saying:

          mitchell_parker
          Mitchell Parker added this to How to Get Rid of Those Pesky Summer Fruit FliesJul 1, 2015

          Getting Rid of Fruit FliesSet traps. Fruit when green doesn’t produce the same odor as ripening fruit. Fruit flies go crazy for ripening bananas, which give off amino acetate. Vinegar and red wine also seem to be strong lures. Some big-box stores, such as Walmart, sell small traps for catching fruit flies, but Jang says there are numerous easier ways to solve the issue based on the three readily available food products mentioned above. Vinegar solution. Jang recommends punching a few holes about two-thirds of the way up a plastic water bottle and adding ⅓ cup of a solution of water with 10 to 20 percent vinegar mixed in. The flies are attracted to the smell of vinegar — hence the name — and will enter the bottle and get trapped in the water and eventually drown.

          mitchell_parker
          Mitchell Parker added this to 10 Design Tips Learned From the Worst Advice EverJan 15, 2014

          4. Pssst: You don’t have to like granite. No, really. You don’t. I swear. Do your own research on materials. You might find that quartz or butcher block (shown here) works best for your living needs. “I was told I must get granite counters,” says Darzy. “No, I don’t. I love the uniformity and no maintenance of quartz.”Closet Classics of Andover says the worst advice received was to “get black granite countertops. They are so hard to keep up with and keep looking clean. Even the slightest fingerprint or smudge shows up. I wouldn’t do it again.”Spurfnickety also deflected the peer pressure about granite countertops and was happy to do so. “I have always loved soapstone. We installed soapstone and after seven years have absolutely no regrets.”

          cninteriors
          Charmean Neithart Interiors added this to 12 Items Worth a Spot on Your Kitchen CounterAug 4, 2013

          Fruit bowl. I keep a bowl on my counter filled with fresh, seasonal fruit to encourage healthy snacking. Browse hundreds of stylish fruit bowls and baskets

          cathylara
          Cathy Lara added this to 13 Home Design and Decor Trends to Watch for in 2013Dec 6, 2012

          Weathered kitchen countertops. More and more of kitchen and bath designer Lance Stratton's clients want countertops that can take the daily wear and tear of family life; there's a move away from show kitchens with precious countertops that clients are afraid to prep on for fear of scratches and dings. "They ask for countertops that already come a bit weathered," he says, "ones that have that banged-up look."

          shannonmalone
          Shannon Malone added this to My Houzz: A Hilltop Family Home in Santa CruzAug 5, 2012

          Enid chose a Madrone butcher block for the kitchen island. "When I remember to oil it (which I do not) it has a gorgeous rich, dark finish," she says. "But because we all use it like a giant cutting board — slicing melon, making sandwiches and rolling pie crust — it tends to be somewhat neglected when it comes to religious maintenance."Growing up in a family that covered its refrigerator with report cards, snapshots and other family memorabilia, Enid wanted to do the same. The wood-framed doors are custom made with galvanized metal panels, perfect for hanging family treasures. "I know it may look messy, but that's what makes a kitchen feel like home to me."

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