Lancaster woodland home and gardenTraditional Landscape, Philadelphia

Hanselman Landscape and Gardens

This is an example of a large traditional water fountain landscape in Philadelphia. —  Houzz
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This photo has 10 questions
red100 wrote:May 16, 2013
brownstone_shel wrote:Apr 9, 2015
  • irishgrammy

    Is there a specific name for the Japanese looking water feature ? Love the design!

  • PRO
    Hanselman Landscape and Gardens

    Tsukubai refers to this traditional part of a tea garden, where guests would refresh themselves upon arrival, before entering the tea room. Perhaps it can represent hospitality and refreshment in any garden, as it soothes away the cares of the day.

    James Hanselman

catlvr wrote:Jan 29, 2014
  • PRO
    California Fence Company

    Loved everything in this picture, right from the stones that have
    been used on the walking path to the trees and plants and to the stone
    used in the water feature. Wonderful picture and an awesome project. Could you please share the names of the trees and plants that can be seen here. Thanks for any replies. http://bit.ly/1xWktmt


  • PRO
    Hanselman Landscape and Gardens

    Green Japanese Maple, Heavenly Bamboo, Boxwood, Blue Holly, Sweetbox and Pachysandra are the main plants in the composition. There are a few Astilbe, Fern, Hosta and Lenten Rose. Further up the bank, native Rhododendron, native Holly, and English Ivy are visible.

dakotaaustindavis wrote:Mar 16, 2015
carolynnamciu wrote:Jun 24, 2013
poppyqueen wrote:Apr 29, 2019
  • PRO
    Hanselman Landscape and Gardens

    Poppy queen, the needles are from Longleaf Pine, Pinus palustris, a native Pine to the southeastern US. The photo was taken right after installation, and shows more mulch than planned. Our client expects to let the Pachysandra ground-cover grow to the sides of the path and eventually have moss between the stones. The Pine needles are a fragrant temporary mulch in this case, but a favorite of ours as a breathable permanent garden mulch.

engk916 wrote:Aug 28, 2016
rebecca62 wrote:Jun 7, 2014
  • PRO
    Hanselman Landscape and Gardens
    Thanks for asking.

    The chozubachi basin is a natural boulder. It is ironstone from near Hershey PA with a naturally-occurring cleft.

    If you want we could search for another "broken" boulder. We also carve hollows into boulders for this purpose.

    James Hanselman
Suzanne Mueller wrote:Apr 29, 2014
bursk wrote:May 29, 2013
  • PRO
    Hanselman Landscape and Gardens
    Yes, the needles are from Longleaf Pine, Pinus palustris, a native Pine to the southeastern US. The photo was taken right after installation, and shows more mulch than planned. Our client expects to let the Pachysandra ground-cover grow to the sides of the path and eventually have moss between the stones. The Pine needles are a fragrant temporary mulch in this case, but a favorite of ours as a breathable permanent garden mulch.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

curtis_adams_garden
Curtis Adams added this to Lowly Mulch Makes Magic in the GardenDec 29, 2016

The soft bed of pine needles highlights the hard steppingstones on this woodland path in Pennsylvania.Pine needles. Pine needles form an excellent mulch most appropriate to a woodland setting with acid-loving evergreen trees and shrubs. Their high resin content makes them slow to break down, and their needlelike shape resists compaction. Pine needles make a good covering for pathways; however, because they can be slippery when wet, they aren’t so good on sloping paths. Pros: Is long-lived, offers excellent water permeability and thermal insulation, suppresses weeds well, retains moisture; improves soil quality slowly over time, is economical in areas with a lot of pine trees and has a pleasant scent.Cons: Comes in only one color and can get slippery when wet, especially on otherwise compacted surfaces.

stevenrandel
Steven Corley Randel, Architect added this to Building Green: The Paths, Beds and Decks That Define Your LandscapeJul 29, 2015

Walks. This Philadelphia landscape uses ironstone obtained from nearby Hershey, Pennsylvania, for this beautiful garden path. Local natural materials such as this stone can be a better choice compared with engineered materials, which come with all of the downsides of manufacturing. They are also a better choice than natural materials that come from a distant location, as those require more energy and time to be shipped. Check into local sources whenever possible; you may make some unexpected finds.In the approach to the New York beach house below, some of the natural dune has been left intact, and it includes a wooden boardwalk, a design that has been used for decades in the area. The charming simplicity of this solution reinforces a sustainable trend that could be applied to locations other than sand dunes. When using wood in outdoor applications, you will want to consider its durability as well as its renewability. Stick with wood species that are easily replenished and commonly used in your area.

baanthony
Bryan Anthony added this to States of Style: Alabama’s Icons Leave Their MarkApr 29, 2015

State tree: Pinus palustris, or longleaf pine, is an evergreen conifer that grows along the Gulf Coastal Plain from eastern Texas to southeastern Virginia. The tree got its name from having the longest leaves of the eastern pine species. The needle-like leaves grow in bunches of three and can grow up to 18 inches long. The extremely long needles are popular for use in the ancient craft of making coiled baskets. In 1949 the Alabama legislature first designated the state tree as “the southern pine tree.” It wasn’t until 1997 that longleaf pine was specified.Longleaf pines were historically used for lumber, resin and turpentine, but due to deforestation and overharvesting, only about 3 percent of the original longleaf pine forest remains, and little new is planted. Longleaf pines are available, however, at many nurseries in the Southeast.Tip: Dried longleaf pine needles work well as a ground cover in gardens, as seen here.

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to 15 Ideas for a Stunning Garden PathMar 4, 2015

3. Woodland path. Fragrant pine-needle mulch surrounds round stepping stones leading to a bamboo and stone fountain in this wooded garden. A pathway like this is a wonderful way to bring a bit of magic to a shady spot in the yard.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

idesignpv
Interiors By Melody added this to LandscapingJul 24, 2019

I like the flat rocks along with a large anchor rock

maggiegates
maggiegates added this to walkwayJun 29, 2019

WATER feature: by secret garden

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