Lawn Replacement Edible Landscape contemporary-landscape
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Lawn Replacement Edible Landscape Contemporary Landscape, San Francisco

A large custom built 3-bin compost bin is tucked into a corner of the yard.
Patricia Larenas, Urban Artichoke
URL
http://www.urbanartichoke.com/
This is an example of a mid-sized contemporary partial sun backyard mulch vegetable garden landscape in San Francisco. — Houzz

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Michael wrote:
Good day, do you have plans to share for this bin? - Looking for plans to construct your large custom built 3-bin compost bin. thank you
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creepy2

Me too!! how could we get a set of plans?

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Urban Artichoke Fine Gardening and Design

I'm sorry, I don't have any plans for this. It was custom built by a gardener who happens to be a great carpenter. I only gave them guidelines, such as: there should be three compartments a minimum of 3x3 ft. in dimension, and lids are needed to keep out unwanted guests (critters!)

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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Laura Gaskill added this to Remake Your Backyard Into a Mini Farm
Start a compost pile. If you have a garden, making your own compost is a logical next step. By saving your kitchen food scraps, chicken droppings (if you have a backyard flock), dry leaves and yard waste, you can create your very own stockpile of “black gold” to enrich your garden beds.Are you ready to make compost?Do you have critters in your area that may try to get in the compost bin? If so, you will need a securely closed container.Collecting food scraps (along with eggshells and coffee grounds) from the kitchen is an easy way to add to your compost pile and reduce landfill waste. Keep a small bin with a cover in your kitchen to make collection easy.Remember to add “brown” organic matter between layers of “green” (kitchen scraps). Good additions for the brown layer include dried leaves, hay, straw, wood chips and trimmings from trees. Keeping a pile of brown matter near your compost bin makes it easier to remember to do this.Turning your compost pile often will help the contents break down faster.Get on a Composting Kick (Hello, Free Fertilizer!)
Lauren Dunec Design added this to California Gardeners’ June Checklist
Set up a compost bin. If you don’t already have one, it’s worth setting up a system for composting lawn clippings, weeds (sans seed heads), dried leaves, kitchen scraps and plants pulled from spring beds. A three-bin system is an ideal setup for turning the compost pile and speeding up the decomposition process. If you don’t have much space, a single bin (or just a pile on the ground) works well too. Either way, within a few months, your green waste will have transformed into a nutrient-rich amendment for the garden.MoreSee more regional gardening guides10 Top California Native Plants, Trees and Grasses
Modern Hive Design added this to 3 Chores to Do Now to Prep Your Garden for Winter and Spring
1. Jump-Start a Compost PileCompost piles are the Rumpelstiltskins of the garden, magically spinning dried straw, leaves and stems into gardener’s gold: compost rich in organic matter, moisture-retaining humus and nutrients that create healthy, strong plants and reduce the need for chemical fertilizers. Food scraps and yard waste make up 20 to 30 percent of what we throw into landfills, where they create toxic greenhouse gases. Instead of throwing away your dried leaves, collect them into a pile to turn into rich compost for your spring planting.
Noelle Johnson Landscape Consulting added this to Enjoy Your Pumpkins Beyond Halloween
5. Add to the compost pile. Not surprisingly, pumpkins are a great source of nutrients for compost. Cut up pumpkins into smaller sections to allow them to break down more quickly. Come spring, the pumpkin compost will add new life to your garden.Don’t have a compost bin? Simply cut up your pumpkin and bury it where nearby plants will enjoy the phosphorus and other nutrients it will add to the soil.
Marianne Lipanovich added this to What You Should Know About Composting in Winter
To add a little more winter protection and help keep things tidy, you can build walls around your pile. Though there are some elaborate systems, such as the one seen here, you can also use cinder blocks or even straw bales to corral your compost. Building against a south- or west-facing wall or fence also takes advantage of reflected solar heat to keep the compost warm.Browse compost bins
Lauren Dunec Design added this to 12 Enclosure Ideas for Trash Bins, Compost Piles and AC Units
11. Give Compost an Organized Three-Bin SystemIf you have the space for it, installing a three-bin compost system can help turn a growing heap into a tidier system that is easier to manage. Generally speaking, a three-bin system works by always having compost going at different levels of decomposition. Fresh food scraps, garden clippings and leaf litter would be added to one bin, the middle bin would have scraps that are a little more decomposed, and the third bin would be filled with fully decomposed, ready-to-nourish-your-garden compost.Urban Artichoke built this composting system for a San Francisco Bay Area client with a backyard edible garden. The bins are positioned along the back wall of the property, partially out of view and with easy access to raised beds.Shop for a compost bin on Houzz

What Houzzers are commenting on:

karenholton added this to new build
Build small & low enough to ‘hide’ along back north edge of garden plot
lesa61 added this to Garden
installing a three-bin compost system can help turn a growing heap into a tidier system that is easier to manage. Generally speaking, a three-bin system works by always having compost going at different levels of decomposition. Fresh food scraps, garden clippings and leaf litter would be added to one bin, the middle bin would have scraps that are a little more decomposed, and the third bin would be filled with fully decomposed, ready-to-nourish-your-garden compost.

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