Mud RoomFarmhouse Entry, New York

Custom designed "cubbies" insure that the Mud Room stays neat & tidy.


Robert Benson Photography

Example of a large cottage medium tone wood floor entryway design in New York with gray walls and a white front door —  Houzz
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This photo has 12 questions
janjerh wrote:Jul 26, 2015
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    We custom designed the door assembly and had it made by Woodstone in New Hampshire.

  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    The flooring is random-width pine, custom stained to match the antique flooring in the original house. The finish is satin polyurethane.

kellybranford wrote:Mar 1, 2016
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    The antique deacon's bench was made in New England, circa 1830. It's approximately 6' long x 15" deep. It was from Charles Haver Antiques, Roxbury, CT.

  • kellybranford

    Thank you!

miastensrud wrote:Feb 4, 2016
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    The Mud Room is 7'-6" wide x 20' long. It runs the full depth of the house and has French doors at each end.

  • miastensrud

    Thank you so much for your prompt reply.

allisonaallen wrote:Jan 5, 2016
Myron Angela wrote:Oct 16, 2017
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    Thanks so much. These are antique oak timbers. We had them lightly wire-brushed & then left them unfinished.

kellybranford wrote:Mar 27, 2017
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    Thanks for your question! We created two rows of staggered pegs. The highest row is 5'-9" above the floor; the lower row is 4'-6" above the floor. The top row allows plenty of room for coats above the bench; the bottom row is great for hats & jackets for the smaller children.

Evy Ells wrote:Aug 1, 2016
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    Actually, It's an antique tea bin with "A&P Tea Company" stenciled on the front. Our clients use it to store their children's baseball mitts, balls & bats.

Ranelle Barth wrote:Jun 10, 2016
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    We custom designed the French door assembly and had it made by Woodstone, in New Hampshire. For resistance to the elements, we had it made of mahogany. We also used hand-blown reproduction glass to create an antique quality.

bakersisland wrote:Dec 30, 2015
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    The tea bin is late 19th century American with "A&P" painted on the front. We found it at an outdoor antiques fair in Fitzwilliam, New Hampshire.

Allison Hamiel Carpenter wrote:Nov 4, 2015
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    Thanks for your question. We used individual planks with a ship-lapped edge. The planks are random-width, to give it an antique look.

healthforwardyoga wrote:Aug 16, 2015
  • PRO
    Haver & Skolnick LLC Architects

    These were antique New England lanterns, from Charles Haver Antiques, which we had wired for electricity. The website www.charleshaverantiques .com shows similar lanterns , plus there are several others in stock.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

mitchell_parker
Mitchell Parker added this to 25 Design Trends Coming to Homes Near You in 2016Dec 23, 2015

25. Farmhouse entryways. Stripping away the need for fancy flourishes or decor for decor’s sake, farmhouse style gets at the root of function. That’s why the style makes sense for mudrooms, where simplicity in storage and durability in materials are paramount. See more farmhouse-style entryways

becky
Becky Harris added this to The Most Popular Entry Photos of 2015Dec 9, 2015

A place for everything. The first step in the design process here was taking inventory of all the sweatshirts, shoes, bags, outerwear and devices in need of charging stations that were bursting the seams of the existing mudroom shared by a family of six. Then the cubbies required to hold all of that were planned out. Notice the details befitting the 18th-century farmhouse, such as the antique lanterns and bench and the ceiling beams. Paint: Brandon Beige, Benjamin Moore; ceiling: unpainted plaster, Imperial; floor: wide-board common-grade oak; rug: Dash & Albert; antique lanterns, bench, coffee bin: Charles Haver Antiques

mitchell_parker
Mitchell Parker added this to New This Week: 5 Farmhouse-Style Entryways We Want to Come Home ToJul 22, 2015

1. Storage for 6Designers: Charles Haver and Stewart Skolnick of Haver & Skolnick ArchitectsLocation: Litchfield County, Connecticut Size: 225 square feet (20.9 square meters)Year built: 2009Homeowners’ request: “An informal country mudroom that would neatly accommodate the many boots, coats and hats of a very large and active family of six,” architect Charles Haver says.Plan of attack: “Providing enough storage was key. We first inventoried the many shoes, sweatshirts etc. that were overflowing from their old mudroom.”Why the design works: “We designed the custom cubbies to neatly organize the shoes and sweatshirts. Drawers were also provided for gloves and keys. Outlets were provided for phone recharging. Rows of Shaker pegs were added for coats and hats. After move-in, the homeowners requested additional storage for tennis racquets, baseball bats, balls and mitts. We found antique coffee bins to hold these items, and [they] provided a contrast to the built-ins.”What goes on here: “The space serves as the main family entrance for the house and storage for all their outerwear.”Who uses it: “The home is a country weekend retreat for a family of six.”Designer secret: “The space is in an addition to an 18th-century farmhouse, so we wanted it to have an antique character. We introduced antique ceiling beams, lanterns, and used rough plaster for the ceiling.”“Uh-oh” moment: “The budget would not allow for the stone floor which was originally planned. Instead, we introduced wide-board oak floors that have an antique character.”Splurges and savings: “We offset the cost of the built-in cubbies by using an antique bench rather than a more expensive custom built-in.”Take-away: “You can never have too much storage.”The nitty-gritty: Paint: Brandon Beige 977, Benjamin Moore; ceiling: unpainted plaster, Imperial; floor: wide-board common-grade oak; rug: Dash & Albert; antique lanterns, bench, coffee bin: Charles Haver AntiquesTeam involved: Churchill Builders (general contractor); DeStefano & Chamberlain (structural engineer)See the rest of this house

What Houzzers are commenting on:

webuser_836808934
HU-836808934 added this to mud roomAug 13, 2019

separate bench, hook shoe cubbies

joe_marinucci
Joe Marinucci added this to Breck RemodelAug 2, 2019

like the drawers in the middle of the cubbies

rchelstowski
Rachel Chelstowski added this to Chelstowski Additional ProjectsJul 24, 2019

I didn’t mention this but one idea I also have is putting some wood beams like this on the ceiling in the family room.

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