My Houzz: Creativity Flows in a New Hampshire CottageFarmhouse, New York

Photo: Rikki Snyder © 2014 Houzz

Inspiration for a country home design remodel in New York —  Houzz
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Details Squared wrote:Aug 11, 2014

    What Houzz contributors are saying:

    becky
    Becky Harris added this to Buzzworthy Book: ‘The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning’Dec 20, 2017

    Getting a grip. The emotions that go along with downsizing can be tough; Magnusson recommends working “at a pace that suits you” if you have the luxury of time. “Now is not the time to get stuck in memories. No, now planning for your future is much more important. Look forward to a much easier and calmer life — you will love it!” she writes.Self-care and perspective are important during downsizing. “Regard your cleaning as an ordinary, everyday job. And in between, enjoy yourself as much as possible with all the things you like to do,” she writes.

    lolalina
    Laura Gaskill added this to Pre-Storage Checklist: 10 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You StoreMar 30, 2015

    7. Do you know who or what you are saving it for? When you start saving things, whether for yourself, your children or grandchildren, making decisions about what to keep can be quite a challenge. Here are a few things to keep in mind: The space items take up. A small amount of carefully chosen and properly stored items can be far more meaningful (and welcome) than an attic’s worth of overstuffed, unlabeled boxes. When you have a choice to make about which items to save, if all else is equal, go with the smaller ones.Proper labeling. Tucking in a note about where each piece came from or why it is important to you can also help pass along stories to the next generation. And if you are saving articles of clothing or toys for a future child, store items by age and write the age range outside the box.Photo books. While a book certainly can’t replace everything, for certain artifacts (for instance, crumbling preschool sculptures), it might be even more special to photograph the items and arrange the photos in a book that also tells the backstory.

    rikkisnyder
    Rikki Snyder added this to My Houzz: Creativity Flows in a New Hampshire CottageJul 20, 2014

    Collected treasures and Decatur’s artwork are displayed on her bookshelves. “The art that I live with tells my life’s story. I have the first oil painting I ever owned, an owl given to me by a friend of my mother’s in the early ’60s. The first portrait I ever did, a crayon drawing of my mother, sits framed on my desk,” says Decatur. “I’m fortunate to know so many talented artists, and their gifts of art are especially cherished. I also hang my own current work. The walls change as paintings catch the eye of a client or visitor.” Although Decatur rarely shops anymore, she has a weakness for linens. One of her favorite local haunts is Grove and Main in Peterborough, New Hampshire. The owner, Jane Gallagher, goes abroad to find vintage sheets, napkins, aprons and nightgowns. Most of Decatur’s newer acquisitions come from her daily walks in the woods; a nest or a feather will often make its way into her artwork.

    What Houzzers are commenting on:

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    Kathryn Barton added this to DeclutterJan 3, 2018

    7. Do you know who or what you are saving it for? When you start saving things, whether for yourself, your children or grandchildren, making decisions about what to keep can be quite a challenge. Here are a few things to keep in mind: The space items take up. A small amount of carefully chosen and properly stored items can be far more meaningful (and welcome) than an attic’s worth of overstuffed, unlabeled boxes. When you have a choice to make about which items to save, if all else is equal, go with the smaller ones.Proper labeling. Tucking in a note about where each piece came from or why it is important to you can also help pass along stories to the next generation. And if you are saving articles of clothing or toys for a future child, store items by age and write the age range outside the box.Photo books. While a book certainly can’t replace everything, for certain artifacts (for instance, crumbling preschool sculptures), it might be even more special to photograph the items and arrange the photos in a book that also tells the backstory.

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