My Houzz: Living, Working and Storytelling in 300 Square Feet eclectic-home-office
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My Houzz: Living, Working and Storytelling in 300 Square Feet Eclectic Home Office, New York

Photo: Rikki Snyder © 2014 Houzz
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http://rikkisnyder.com
Eclectic home office photo in New York — Houzz

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Rikki Snyder added this to My Houzz: Living, Working and Storytelling in 300 Square Feet
A small painting by her father hangs above her desk. It makes her think of openness and possibility — exactly what she needs while working. The vintage Rolleiflex camera on top of this cabinet belonged to her grandfather, who was a photographer.Cabinet: HomeGoods; green clipboard: Fab
Brenna Malmberg added this to How to Organize Your Digital Photos
2. Back up: Ideally, you want to back up your photos in three locations, Cuillo says, but many people end up with only two: one on-site and one off-site. You want to have these backup copies of your photos in case of technology failure, power failure, fire, robbery or natural disaster. On-site, you can use an external hard drive or another form of storage. Cuillo likes to use a product called Picture Keeper. It’s a small stick that automatically backs up your images when you plug it in. Off-site, you can use cloud storage. There are many options, including PhotoSync, Backblaze, CrashPlan and Google Photos. Cuillo recommends reading more about the storage services online or consulting with your photo organizer to find the best one for you. For extra photo security, use a third backup option. This could be another of the above options or a storage device, such as the Picture Keeper, that you can keep in a safe deposit box and update on a regular basis. 3. Categorize: You can organize your photos in any way that works for you, Cuillo says, but a standard method is by year and then by month. You can set up a system on your desktop computer with folders for each year, and within those year folders, create additional folders for each month. Cuillo recommends naming the monthly folders with a numeral in front of the month name so that the folders line up chronologically rather than alphabetically. For example, within the 2016 folder, you would have folders named “01 - January,” “02 - February” and so on. Within the month folders, you can also create additional folders for events. Read more: Why and How to Name Your Digital PhotosAt this stage, you can also use a photo management software program to help you clean up your duplicates, name files, add keywords and tag faces. Again, many options exist. Cuillo says she has clients who use Adobe Lightroom, Forever Historian and Photos on Apple devices.
Brenna Malmberg added this to 8 Home Desk Areas That Work and Stay Tidy Too
Her primary office supplies are her iMac and 20-plus terabytes of regular and backup storage. She works with large digital files, so all that storage is what really makes her small office work. Takeaway: Even the simplest room divider can help you keep your focus on work. As for your digital belongings, once you have ample storage space on your computer, put your files away where they belong, the way you put your clothes in your closet. Read more about the space-saving ideas in this New York City apartment

What Houzzers are commenting on:

christietoo added this to PHOTOGRAPHY
Back up: Ideally, you want to back up your photos in three locations, Cuillo says, but many people end up with only two: one on-site and one off-site. You want to have these backup copies of your photos in case of technology failure, power failure, fire, robbery or natural disaster. On-site, you can use an external hard drive or another form of storage. Cuillo likes to use a product called Picture Keeper. It’s a small stick that automatically backs up your images when you plug it in. Off-site, you can use cloud storage. There are many options, including PhotoSync, Backblaze, CrashPlan and Google Photos. Cuillo recommends reading more about the storage services online or consulting with your photo organizer to find the best one for you. For extra photo security, use a third backup option. This could be another of the above options or a storage device, such as the Picture Keeper, that you can keep in a safe deposit box and update on a regular basis. 3. Categorize: You can organize your photos in any way that works for you, Cuillo says, but a standard method is by year and then by month. You can set up a system on your desktop computer with folders for each year, and within those year folders, create additional folders for each month. Cuillo recommends naming the monthly folders with a numeral in front of the month name so that the folders line up chronologically rather than alphabetically. For example, within the 2016 folder, you would have folders named “01 - January,” “02 - February” and so on. Within the month folders, you can also create additional folders for events. At this stage, you can also use a photo management software program to help you clean up your duplicates, name files, add keywords and tag faces. Again, many options exist. Cuillo says she has clients who use Adobe Lightroom, Forever Historian and Photos on Apple devices.
mayazamzz added this to mayazamzz's Ideas
Inspirational workstation. There's that small cabinet again with some 'locker' drawers... so cool.

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