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New ConstructionTraditional , New York

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What Houzz contributors are saying:

mitchell_parker
Mitchell Parker added this to Have the Kids Left Home? 16 Things to ConsiderMay 1, 2014

11. Tackle that remodeling project. Now that you have a sense of how your new life will go, consider tackling those dream projects you’ve always wanted to. And, if you’re aging in place, think about how your home will help assist you as the years go by. Can you make it more livable for your new lifestyle? Should you remove a second floor and add on to the first? At the very least, this is a good time for a home refresher. Try some new paint schemes or swap out furnishings. With the peanut gallery gone, you can finally make the changes you want. To some this kind of upkeep can be therapeutic. Houzz user olldroo feels that maintaining a larger home into retirement is mentally and physically beneficial to counteract aging: “Sure, our bodies can let us down no matter what we do, and the financial aspect has to be taken into consideration, but as we are all obviously home lovers here, just that getting out of bed each day with a purpose, maintaining and decorating our homes and the physicality of cleaning and gardening, to me just has to be beneficial. There are those too who downsize and travel for months at a time or take on outside interests. Great if you have the motivation and finances to do that.”

mitchell_parker
Mitchell Parker added this to Survive Your Home Remodel: 11 Must-Ask QuestionsAug 26, 2013

10. Will you please, for the love of God, stop the hammering? Construction sites aren’t meditative places. People are constantly coming and going, hammering and cranking the band saw. If you’re a couple who both work and are gone all day, this might be no sweat. But if you’re a stay-at-home parent with young kids who need their daily nap, you’ll want to figure out a quiet place you can go to. What to do: Arrange for a daily refuge at a friend or family member’s house if possible. If not, you might want to hold off renovating until you can rent or buy a used RV or stay in a hotel, or until your kids are old enough to be at school all day. Also, tool noise comes with the territory, but don't be afraid to tell your contractors to not blare their music all day. 11. Do you have time for this? If you’re not a morning person, you’re not going to like your general contractor's showing up at 7 a.m. every morning and looking for you. You need to be available to a general contractor. Also, you can’t exactly leave town on vacation for three months and hope all goes to plan. You’ll still need to be available for phone calls and emails, even if you’re in Australia and your home is in the U.S. What to do: You need to be available to your general contractor to answer questions and make sure things are moving along smoothly. Conrado says that 8 a.m. is reasonably the latest time workers should show up. “These people have jobs; they have to work," he says. "If you want to have everyone show up at 10 a.m. every day, sure they’ll do it if you’re going to pay them for those hours they could be working.” Your turn: What's your best remodeling prep tip? More:Find a general contractor near you10 Things to Ask Your Contractor Before You Start Your ProjectMore Houzz remodeling guides

vanessa_brunner
Vanessa Brunner added this to Contractor Tips: Top 10 Home Remodeling Don'tsAug 23, 2012

8. Don’t be a distraction. It may sound harsh, but every minute someone working on your house spends talking to you, they are not working on your house. Is the conversation important and one that will have an impact on the job? That’s one thing, but the electrician on the job isn’t getting paid any more to spend 30 minutes talking about your vacation plans.9. Don’t ignore what the house wants. Though some people can pull off wearing a pair of high-top sneakers with a tuxedo, it can also go horribly wrong. Houses are the same way. Can an ultramodern kitchen in a Victorian brownstone work? Absolutely, but make sure you can pull it off. This is not to say a house can’t evolve with the times. There are no hard and fast rules — just get to know your house, live in it and do your research before you pull out the sledgehammer.Find an experienced remodeler who will give you honest opinions

What Houzzers are commenting on:

dyhaigler
dyhaigler added this to Planning ConstructionNov 10, 2013

8. Don't be a distraction. It may sound harsh, but every minute someone working on your house spends talking to you, they are not working on your house. Is the conversation important and one that will have an impact on the job? That's one thing, but the electrician on the job isn't getting paid any more to spend 30 minutes talking about your vacation plans. 9. Don't ignore what the house wants. Though some people can pull off wearing a pair of high-top sneakers with a tuxedo, it can also go horribly wrong. Houses are the same way. Can an ultramodern kitchen in a Victorian brownstone work? Absolutely, but make sure you can pull it off. This is not to say a house can’t evolve with the times. There are no hard and fast rules — just get to know your house, live in it and do your research before you pull out the sledgehammer.

zippitydoodaday
zippitydoodaday added this to ArchitectureSep 8, 2013

11. Do you have time for this? If you’re not a morning person, you’re not going to like your general contractor's showing up at 7 a.m. every morning and looking for you. You need to be available to a general contractor. Also, you can’t exactly leave town on vacation for three months and hope all goes to plan. You’ll still need to be available for phone calls and emails, even if you’re in Australia and your home is in the U.S. What to do: You need to be available to your general contractor to answer questions and make sure things are moving along smoothly. Conrado says that 8 a.m. is reasonably the latest time workers should show up. “These people have jobs; they have to work," he says. "If you want to have everyone show up at 10 a.m. every day, sure they’ll do it if you’re going to pay them for those hours they could be working.”

lindaraeclark
lindaraeclark added this to lindaraeclark's ideasSep 9, 2012

Add to ideabook by Midtown Builders, Inc by Midtown Builders, Inc 6. Don't let kids and pets get in the way. Though the people working in your home will often try to accommodate your pets and kids, they shouldn’t have to — it's just not safe to have children or animals around construction. 7. Don't live in the home. Most people ignore this rule, and for good reason. Remodeling is expensive, and moving out just adds to the cost. If you can’t move out for the whole job, try to schedule some time away and set up a clean, comfortable place to retreat to when you can’t handle coming home to a messy and stressful construction site.

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