October check listEclectic Landscape

A layer of floating row cover over tender crops will protect them from light frosts and extend the growing season.
Photo taken in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Photo credit; Niki Jabbour

Design ideas for an eclectic landscaping in Other. —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
This photo has no questions

What Houzz contributors are saying:

mariannel
Marianne Lipanovich added this to Warm Up a Greenhouse for WinterNov 22, 2017

Provide cover. Adding cloth or plastic covers over your plants will also help keep them warmer. You can use row covers or cloches, or simply improvise with sheets. Just be careful to keep the covers away from the plants themselves. You’ll also need to remove them during the day if your greenhouse temperature or the humidity level gets too high.

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to California Gardener’s December ChecklistNov 18, 2017

Protect plants from frost. Help prevent damage to vegetable starts and other tender plants, like bougainvillea, citrus and salvia, by covering plants with a frost blanket when temperatures drop below freezing. Frost blankets, available from nurseries and home improvement stores, act like a cozy duvet for tender plants — trapping warmth and moisture and keeping frost off foliage. Set stakes around a plant that will need protection and drape the frost blanket over it so that the blanket does not touch the foliage. (Bedsheets or lightweight blankets can be used in a pinch.) Remove the cover in the morning.How to Save Your Plants From Frost

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to 10 Edible Greens to Plant NowSep 10, 2017

7. Mustard GreensThese peppery greens can add a punch of flavor to salad mixtures or a mellower taste to soups. Choose from a wide variety of greens with oval-shaped leaves and serrated edges, in colors from bright green to deep purple. To cut down on the pungent flavor, cut greens when leaves are only 2 to 3 inches long; otherwise add larger leaves to soups. Mustard greens can tolerate some frost but should be protected in prolonged periods of cold.Great for: Salads, soupsWater requirement: Regular, keep the soil moistLight requirement: Full sun to partial shade

anniekendall
Annie Thornton added this to How to Save Your Plants From FrostJan 10, 2017

To cover plants, place stakes around small to medium-size plants and drape frost blankets over the stakes so that, ideally, the blanket covers but does not touch the plant. For larger plants like gardenia and tree ferns, drape coverings over the crown and wrap the trunk. Always remove the covering in the morning. Forgot to buy frost blankets? Old bed sheets or lightweight blankets can be used as well and are preferable to plastic tarps.

karenchapman
Le jardinet added this to Pacific Northwest Gardener's March ChecklistFeb 7, 2013

Add protection for tender crops. Salad leaves and lettuces can also be grown outside in a cold frame or directly sown in the garden with protection from a floating row cover (shown), depending on your climate. If you cover the soil with black plastic for a week or two prior to planting, it will be several degrees warmer and get your seeds off to an even faster start.

jennypeterson
J. Peterson Garden Design added this to Texas and Desert Southwest Gardener's January ChecklistDec 20, 2012

Protect your plants. Even in warm areas, winter can sport some pretty cold temperatures, so it's important to protect your plants from freeze damage.Throw a frost blanket over your vegetable transplants, or invert Styrofoam cups over smaller cacti and succulents. Be sure to remove the coverings by about 9 a.m. the next morning, as the sun will warm everything up; you don't want to create a muggy greenhouse out there.

jennypeterson
J. Peterson Garden Design added this to Texas Gardener's November ChecklistOct 19, 2012

Add row covers to protect from freezes. Although our area of Texas experiences fairly mild winters, we all know that is subject to change. It's not uncommon to have freezing temperatures and occasional snow and ice storms, so be prepared to protect your winter vegetables with row covers. Many nurseries and garden centers have frost blankets that you can drape over arched PVC pipes to cover your beds; be sure to remove the covers when the dangerous weather has passed.

karenchapman
Le jardinet added this to Pacific Northwest Gardener's October ChecklistSep 18, 2012

Extend the harvest. Many vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts and parsnips, survive even harsh frosts. Cover more tender lettuce and carrots with a floating row cover (like Harvest Guard) or a cold frame to extend the growing season.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

dona_akiki68
dona akiki added this to New IdeasDec 20, 2017

To cover plants, place stakes around small to medium-size plants and drape frost blankets over the stakes so that, ideally, the blanket covers but does not touch the plant. For larger plants like gardenia and tree ferns, drape coverings over the crown and wrap the trunk. Always remove the covering in the morning. Forgot to buy frost blankets? Old bed sheets or lightweight blankets can be used as well and are preferable to plastic tarps.

jkward
jkward added this to PlantsNov 22, 2013

Add row covers to protect from freezes. Although our area of Texas experiences fairly mild winters, we all know that is subject to change. It's not uncommon to have freezing temperatures and occasional snow and ice storms, so be prepared to protect your winter vegetables with row covers. Many nurseries and garden centers have frost blankets that you can drape over arched PVC pipes to cover your beds; be sure to remove the covers when the dangerous weather has passed.

betsydarden
Nora Elizabeth added this to Fall ~ Vegetable garden plants.Oct 1, 2012

Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Parsnips,

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268