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http://www.buckminstergreen.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Buckminster Green LLC added this to Contractor Tips: How to Shop for Your Remodel
10. Buy early. Stopping work to wait for materials to arrive is costly. Double the lead time you were told and you'll usually be safe. Delays happen all the time. If the materials are onsite, the contractor can check measurements and answer questions that the spec sheet doesn't address. If you don't want to expose items to theft, store the materials offsite where your general contractor can get to them, but don't try to time material deliveries for the moment they're needed.Next: What to Look for in a Contractor's Contract
Mitchell Parker added this to Survive Your Home Remodel: 11 Must-Ask Questions
2. How much time is it going to take? Permits, inspection, building custom cabinets — these things take time, and sometimes you never know exactly how long something will take. Getting permits varies by city and can take a couple of days or sometimes up to 12 weeks or more.What to do: Start as early as you can. While you’re drawing up plans and doing value engineering, have your designer or architect call to see how long the permit process will take. Also, try to be flexible about the deadline. If you make builders rush to meet a deadline, the quality will likely drop. “It’s important to have a continuous dialogue with your builder,” Conrado says. “You should be concerned if you drop by the jobsite and it’s empty. You should be calling your contractor and asking what’s going on.”3. How long will your materials take to arrive? So you really want that special tile from Italy? Or that cool new refrigerator that’s exported only from Germany? No problem! Just sit tight for three months. If you have to have it, then by all means order what will make you happy. But be prepared for the ramifications if all your workers have to stop midproject because they need to wait six more weeks for a material to arrive. What to do: When you choose a material, ask about the lead time. And be flexible with materials. “There’s not just one perfect answer to materials,” Conrado says. “There are many ways to do it that would look good.” When in doubt, talk with your builder. Builders deal with many jobsites and see a lot of materials. They can usually suggest good alternatives.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

pattik added this to Budgets & Spreadsheets
Buy early. Stopping work to wait for materials to arrive is costly. Double the lead time you were told and you'll usually be safe. Delays happen all the time. If the materials are onsite, the contractor can check measurements and answer questions that the spec sheet doesn't address. If you don't want to expose items to theft, store the materials offsite where your general contractor can get to them, but don't try to time material deliveries for the moment they're needed.
dyhaigler added this to Planning Construction
10. Buy early. Stopping work to wait for materials to arrive is costly. Double the lead time you were told and you'll usually be safe. Delays happen all the time. If the materials are onsite, the contractor can check measurements and answer questions that the spec sheet doesn't address. If you don't want to expose items to theft, store the materials offsite where your general contractor can get to them, but don't try to time material deliveries for the moment they're needed.
zippitydoodaday added this to Architecture
2. How much time is it going to take? Permits, inspection, building custom cabinets — these things take time, and sometimes you never know exactly how long something will take. Getting permits varies by city and can take a couple of days or sometimes up to 12 weeks or more. What to do: Start as early as you can. While you’re drawing up plans and doing value engineering, have your designer or architect call to see how long the permit process will take. Also, try to be flexible about the deadline. If you make builders rush to meet a deadline, the quality will likely drop. “It’s important to have a continuous dialogue with your builder,” Conrado says. “You should be concerned if you drop by the jobsite and it’s empty. You should be calling your contractor and asking what’s going on.”
dontshop added this to remodelling
We schedule deliveries for the day before we will need the material. We don't want any unnecessary materials laying around the job site -- ever. Materials delivered early are more likely to get damaged and often have to be moved or stepped over many times before they are used. With large-scale renovations, material flow is critical. For products that are normally in stock, we place the order well in advance but schedule the delivery with the caveat "MUST DELIVER ON TIME." They almost always do. For special orders, we order early but have the distributor hold the product until we need it. Worst case, we might have to pick something up ourselves, but 95% of the time, deliveries are on time. And that can be improved by calling the day before to be sure you are in the delivery schedule. A do-it-yourselfer might want to allow one extra day for delivery simply because builders and contractors are in the front of the queue in the delivery schedule because of their volume. DIY deliveries are often complicated -- "carry the materials to the Southwest corner of the house, then down the stairs and around the corner..." -- which almost guarantees your delivery will get a low priority.