Polemonium reptans Landscape, Minneapolis

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anniekendall
Annie Thornton added this to Beautify Your Garden With These 15 Blue FlowersJan 30, 2017

Jacob’s Ladder(Polemonium reptans)Jacob’s ladder is another early-spring bloomer from the eastern woodlands. Considered a reliably easy-to-grow plant, Jacob’s ladder stands out in the woodland wildflower garden. It’s also an important plant for pollinators; its flowers provide pollen for bees and beneficial insects, such as syrphid flies and beetles.Bloom season: SpringCold tolerance: Hardy to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 40 degrees Celsius (zones 3 to 7)Origin: Native in eastern North American woodlands, from the states bordering the Mississippi River eastward to New Hampshire in the North and to Georgia in the South. Rare in South Dakota southward to Oklahoma; absent in North Carolina and Maine and the Atlantic provinces in Canada but does occur in Ontario and Quebec in CanadaWater requirement: ModerateLight requirement: Partial sun to full shadeWhen to plant: Spring or fall; bare-root or potted plants are available from many native-plant nurseriesSee how to grow Jacob’s ladder

heatherholm
Holm Design & Consulting LLC added this to Great Design Plant: Polemonium Reptans Paints Woodlands Blue in SpringApr 7, 2015

Botanical name: Polemonium reptansCommon names: Jacob’s ladder, Greek valerianOrigin: Jacob’s ladder occurs in eastern North American woodlands, from the states bordering the Mississippi River eastward to New Hampshire in the north and to Georgia in the south; it is rare in South Dakota southward to Oklahoma; it is absent in North Carolina and Maine and the Atlantic provinces in Canada but does occur in Ontario and Quebec in Canada.Where it will grow: Hardy to -40 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 3a to 7a; find your zone)Typical plant communities: Moist to mesic (semidry) deciduous woodlandsSoil requirement: Wet-mesic to medium-dry (mesic-dry) sandy-loam to clay-loam soilLight requirement: Shade to partial sunMature size: 10 to 20 inches tall and 12 inches wideBenefits and tolerances: Tolerates most soils; prefers woodlands with an ample amount of humus and leaf litterSeasonal interest: Upright flowers with small clusters of large, showy light blue to violet-colored flowers; flowers begin to open in April or May (depending on latitude)When to plant: Spring or fall; bare-root or potted plants are available from many native-plant nurseries

What Houzzers are commenting on:

the_janickis
the_janickis added this to L&G-MN PlantsJun 8, 2019

Jacob’s ladder (Polemonium reptans)

sigrida
Sigrid added this to Plants to buyMar 11, 2018

Botanical name: Polemonium reptans Common names: Jacob’s ladder, Greek valerian Shade, to zone 3a, native to NH but not Maine.

stagingstrategies
Staging Strategies added this to GardenFeb 3, 2018

Jacob’s Ladder (Polemonium reptans) Jacob’s ladder is another early-spring bloomer from the eastern woodlands. Considered a reliably easy-to-grow plant, Jacob’s ladder stands out in the woodland wildflower garden. It’s also an important plant for pollinators; its flowers provide pollen for bees and beneficial insects, such as syrphid flies and beetles.

jasonballew
jasonballew added this to Ballew-Mork Landscape / GardenOct 14, 2017

Polemonium reptans Jacob’s Ladder

missable
missable added this to PLANTSJul 16, 2017

Not known to do well in NC but would love to try it!

jjrardon
Jo Rardon added this to jjrardon's ideasJun 23, 2017

Should be good out by fence in back yard, los of shade and some sun

crabtreestudio
crabtreestudio added this to Landscaping - Misc. IdeasMar 1, 2017

Jacob's Laddar Bloom season: Spring Cold tolerance: Zones 3 to 7 Water requirement: Moderate Light requirement: Partial sun to full shade When to plant: Spring or fall; bare-root or potted plants are available from many native-plant nurseries

spacecadetlms
spacecadetlms added this to woodland gardenFeb 27, 2017

Bloom season: Spring Cold tolerance: Hardy to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 40 degrees Celsius (zones 3 to 7) Origin: Native in eastern North American woodlands, from the states bordering the Mississippi River eastward to New Hampshire in the North and to Georgia in the South. Rare in South Dakota southward to Oklahoma; absent in North Carolina and Maine and the Atlantic provinces in Canada but does occur in Ontario and Quebec in Canada Water requirement: Moderate Light requirement: Partial sun to full shade When to plant: Spring or fall; bare-root or potted plants are available from many native-plant nurseries

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