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Example of an arts and crafts green two-story exterior home design in DC Metro

Porter Street BungalowCraftsman Exterior, DC Metro

The Cleveland Park neighborhood of Washington, D.C boasts some of the most beautiful and well maintained bungalows of the late 19th century. Residential streets are distinguished by the most significant craftsman icon, the front porch.
Porter Street Bungalow was different. The stucco walls on the right and left side elevations were the first indication of an original bungalow form. Yet the swooping roof, so characteristic of the period, was terminated at the front by a first floor enclosure that had almost no penetrations and presented an unwelcoming face. Original timber beams buried within the enclosed mass provided the
only fenestration where they nudged through. The house,
known affectionately as ‘the bunker’, was in serious need of
a significant renovation and restoration.
A young couple purchased the house over 10 years ago as
a first home. As their family grew and professional lives
matured the inadequacies of the small rooms and out of date systems had to be addressed. The program called to significantly enlarge the house with a major new rear addition. The completed house had to fulfill all of the requirements of a modern house: a reconfigured larger living room, new shared kitchen and breakfast room and large family room on the first floor and three modified bedrooms and master suite on the second floor.

Front photo by Hoachlander Davis Photography.
All other photos by Prakash Patel.

Example of an arts and crafts green two-story exterior home design in DC Metro —  Houzz
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Questions About This Photo (32)
Kieran Thompson wrote:Jun 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Meghan Shadrick Interiors

    Yes, I guess that is my dilemma. I dislike how much "space" the trim takes up on replacements. I hate to ask you one more question as I know what its like........the previous owner did do sash replacements in a couple windows and two things I"ve noticed: A) they leak more air in the window jambs than the originals (normal or bad install? B) the plastic insert on the jamb looks really cheap (in your experience are sash replacement on par with new construction?) Thanks again so much!!!

  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    Sash replacements are the cleanest look if you don't want to replace the entire window. The only problem is that you have to rely on the integrity of the old window and if the new sash isn't installed completely square, you'll have alignment issues. This may have been the problem with your sash replacements. Unfortunately the jamb liners do look plastic-y and there's nothing to do about it. The best option is always to do a completely new window, but of course it costs more and you have to redo all of the trim. Good luck with your home!

ChicagoDreamer wrote:Jul 22, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    Just be sure there is a slight slope in any situation to allow for water to run away from your home.

  • jbknowlt

    Yes we have a pitch. Will schluter work as the waterproofing? Thx

larisahaytmanek wrote:May 5, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    It is a lighter color, but unfortunately it is not in our notes. Thank you for the offer, but we stick to larger architectural projects: custom homes and renovations/additions.

  • PRO
    Choice Construction

    Completely understood. Keep up the great work

Elizabeth Allen wrote:Sep 2, 2013
Stephanie wrote:Apr 5, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    The depth of the entire home is 63'-6". The depth of the main roof of the home around 46'-0". Good luck with your renovation!
  • Stephanie
    You're AWESOME!! We are in San Antonio... wish you were closer.
Debra W wrote:Oct 13, 2015
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    However, this was not originally sidelights, and the panels are applied to the exterior of the home. You'd need to infill the walls if you wanted to go for this look. You could also do fixed doors in place of your sidelights.

  • Debra W

    all of this is so helpful. the previous owners had covered and finished off the inside wall over the sidelights but left them in place on the outside, with nothing but particle board to see through the glass, so I either have to replace and clean up the inside or cover them up, and I do love the look of your house! thank you for all your help.

J Vh wrote:Jun 20, 2013
  • jtmendo
    The beams add a huge element to the design. Are they painted glulam beams? composite? I live in the arid Southwest and would be interested in integrating exposed beams such as these, but would require little maintenance in a hot, dry climate. Thanks in advance for any information you can provide.
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These are cedar 6x6 solid wood beams. Thanks for your interest and good luck on your home!
genesis24 wrote:Feb 3, 2013
  • genesis24
    Is that with or without a basement?
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    The 3,811 square feet refers to all finished space, including the finished space in the basement.
carenewhome wrote:Dec 23, 2012
  • reybgee
    is this a two story house?
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    It is a two story house with a finished basement.
roseherdman wrote:Sep 16, 2012
  • PRO
    collage205
    Can you share paint color of the windows please?
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    The windows are painted with Sherwin-Williams' Polished Mahogany (2838)
J Ward wrote:Apr 25, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    This home has Kolbe & Kolbe Heritage wood windows. The office windows are a part of one unit with 5 1/2" spacing between each window. Thank you for your interest in our work!
  • J Ward
    Thanks so much for the info!
bessfredlund wrote:Oct 2, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These are masonry steps with a parged finish. Thanks for your interest!
  • bessfredlund
    Thank you for your quick reply!!!
pennybrack wrote:Jul 14, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    I can't really give a ball park figure because it really depends on where you're located and how much you'll be doing to your home. But, I can give a ball park 'per square foot' renovation cost. This home was probably closer to $300/sf to build. However, you could renovate your home from anywhere between $200-$250/sf, and get a similar level of detail. I would use those numbers as a guide to estimate how much your renovation would cost. I hope this helps! Good luck with your home!
  • pennybrack
    Thank you so much - your response was greatly appreciated!
nanibarba wrote:May 10, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    That's a hard question to answer because of the unique size and shape of lots. This lot, for example, is larger in the front and becomes a smaller wedge in the back. I can tell you that the width of the front of this home is 34'-9 1/2". Depending on specific setback rules, this should help you determine if this scale of home is feasible. Thanks for your interest!
  • nanibarba
    Thank you so much for your swift reply. It was very helpful. Our lot size is about 4300 square feet or
    almost 400 square meters. So I'm guessing this type of house could fit in our lot. Very nice house by the way!
genesis24 wrote:Feb 3, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    I'm pulling numbers out of the air, but I would say that a Craftsman Style home would be about 25% more to build than a typical custom home. The details and trim work in a Craftsman style home add more material, which adds more labor and cost.

    For example, in a Craftsman home you might want to put up solid traditional wainscoting in the dining room. Adding this wainscoting might cost an extra $5,000 onto the total construction.

    I hope this helps!
  • genesis24
    It does. I built a home 5 years ago but have since fallen in love with craftsman architecture. Your home is beautiful, thanks for sharing.
winnie427 wrote:Apr 12, 2018
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    Thanks! This is a four bedroom, 3.5 bath house. It is approximately 3,811 square feet, which reflects all finished space, including the basement. The width of the front is 34'-9 1/2" and depth of the entire home is 63'-6".

Susan Goergen wrote:Jan 18, 2017
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    The windows in the dormer look out from a bedroom on the second floor. Thank you for your interest in our work.

maximillianandrew wrote:Oct 1, 2016
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    We do not give out our floor plans, but you can see much of the layout of the first floor through our photos. Sorry for the lack of information, but thank you for your interest in our work!

Jennifer Radack wrote:Dec 16, 2015
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    Thank you! We have them custom made in the field, but I'm sure there is a way to get similar styles pre-manufactured.

frankandliz wrote:Apr 12, 2015
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC

    Hello frankandliz, I'm sorry for the late reply. This door is a Kolbe & Kolbe Craftsman Series wood door. Thank you for your interest in our work.

carriecrowe wrote:Nov 10, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    I can't find those lights in our notes, but check out Arroyo Craftsman outdoor light fixtures. We use them quite often for our craftsman homes. Thank you for your interest in our work!
    http://www.arroyo-craftsman.com/
philbet wrote:Mar 3, 2014
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    Door: 3'-6"
    Entire side panel width: 1'-9"
    Trim around side panels and door: 3 1/2" at top and 5 1/2" at bottom.

    Thank you for your interest in our work!
havoc007 wrote:Nov 7, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    We do not give out our floor plans, but you can see much of the layout of the first floor through our photos. Sorry for the lack of information, but thank you for your interest in our work!
Beth Z Ship wrote:Oct 14, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    Thank you! We have never sold plans before, but you can send us a message on our profile page or send an email to Charles Moore at cmoore@moorearch.com.
Bliss wrote:Sep 27, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These are the colors from Sherwin Williams:

    All trim, including eaves: Downing Sand SW 2822
    Cedar Shingles: Downing Earth SW 2820
    Stucco: Downing Earth SW 2820
    Windows: Polished Mahogany SW 2838
Ashley Do wrote:Jun 14, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    I can't seem to find the stain color in our notes. Sorry for the lack of information, but thank you for your interest!
magargis wrote:Apr 30, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These were custom built stair posts and railings. Thanks for your interest!
leoniewilliamson wrote:Apr 23, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    We are actually about to go under construction on a Dutch Colonial now, but we have not worked on any in the past. Check back in with us next year! Thanks for your interest!
TR Knapp Architects wrote:Mar 25, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    That's correct! This home was on the cover of Fine Homebuilding from their "The Best of Fine Homebuilding, Before and After" issue in 2011. Thank you for noticing!
butterys2 wrote:Feb 14, 2013
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    The master suite is actually located on the rear of the home, but what you're seeing is one of the three other bedrooms. The two other bedrooms have windows located on the left and right. If you take a look at the other photos of this home, you'll see more of the second floor than is perceived in the front elevation.

    Thanks for your interest!
jphair71 wrote:Nov 17, 2012
  • PRO
    Moore Architects, PC
    These are the colors from Sherwin Williams:

    All trim, including eaves: Downing Sand SW 2822 (finish-semigloss)
    Cedar Shingles: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-flat)
    Stucco: Downing Earth SW 2820 (finish-semigloss)
    Windows: Polished Mahogany SW 2838 (finish-semigloss)

What Houzz contributors are saying:

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to Nail Your Curb Appeal: Craftsman StyleJun 7, 2016

Multipane windows and doors. Typically, Craftsman homes have double-hung windows with either a four-over-one or six-over-one pattern, while doors nearly always have panes of glass in the upper portion of the door.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lwhikeha
Mary Smith added this to 1920s BungalowMay 3, 2019

Front steps compared to before pic

queenbzzz
Debbie Nicoletti added this to Doors and Trim WorkMay 3, 2019

like the door with small windows in it

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