ResidentialTraditional Patio, San Francisco

Patio - traditional patio idea in San Francisco with a pergola —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
Related Professionals in San Francisco
This photo has 14 questions
discodaisy33 wrote:Jun 21, 2012
  • jim8kin
    John,
    I am about to go purchase the materials for this project and I was curious on the bolt sizes you used to secure the rafter, etc.
    Thanks for the help and I can't wait to see my finished project.
    Wish me luck!!
    Jim
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Sorry, Jim, I can't tell you that. I didn't provide construction specs for this, just trusted the project carpenter. However, as far as I know there wasn't anything extraordinary about the fasteners, so I would guess a good DIY reference (or lumber yard) would be able to help you there. I will wish you luck, though -- post pics of your success here on Houzz!
    John
allisonada wrote:Jun 13, 2012
  • K.c. Capek

    OK, so the wider 'base' at the bottom of the posts is just boxed around the 8x8? and the actual post goes deeper correct? Thank you.

  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    K.c., you're half correct. The wider base (or "boot") is built around the main 8x8 post. However, in this case, the post itself is not embedded below ground: the Simpson bracket holds it just above ground to allow water to drain away. Some contractors will set posts directly into the footing concrete, but in my opinion using a bracket is better in structural applications like this.
julygarden wrote:Feb 21, 2013
  • PRO
    Backyard Buildings
    That is absolutely beautiful. Great job!
  • Dana C.
    Please post again when vine on pergola is mature!
jim8kin wrote:Oct 31, 2012
  • PRO
    King Garden Design Landscape Design
    I like this pergola....what size is it approx?
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Erin, thanks for asking! The posts are about 13'-3" on center (wide) by 10'-3" on center (deep), while the rafters etc. are about 16'-0" wide by 13'-6" deep. The overall structure is about 9' tall.
lisajenkins84 wrote:Oct 25, 2012
  • bsternad
    Do you know what grade of wood you used?
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    I'm fairly certain the posts are Con Heart but the beams etc. may have been Heart B. This carpenter has excellent relationships with a lumber yard who often lets him hand-pick pieces that are tagged as Con Heart but clear enough to look like B grade. I hope this helps!
    —John
kdt64 wrote:Aug 21, 2012
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    If memory serves, those are 8x8 posts with 4x12 beams, 2x8 rafters and 4x6 purlins on top. Hope that helps!
    John
  • PRO
    Vikrant Sharma Homez
    Looks Amazing .
Design Directions wrote:Aug 18, 2012
mslymburner wrote:Oct 22, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Actually Simpson Strong-Tie (www.strongtie.com) brackets are specifically designed to make safe, code-compliant connections, and are the system of choice here in earthquake country. Of course it's all dependent on a good design and appropriate construction -- if you have concerns do NOT attempt to design/build it yourself, work with a qualified structural engineer or other licensed professional and get a building permit.

josh hughes wrote:Jul 9, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Thanks, Josh! I'm glad you like it. If memory serves, the footprint of the posts is about 13' x 10' on center, and the canopy perimeter is about 16' x 13'. The structure is about 11' high overall; the actual height was determined in the field by the height of the home's rain gutters.

    —John

jeff_bragg wrote:Jul 5, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Jeff, I actually have no idea. We did not provide construction specs, just allowed the carpenter to do his thing. Sorry I can't be more help!
    —John
Dana C. wrote:Jul 25, 2013
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Thanks for asking. Here a synthetic wood headerboard (e.g. Trex brand) was used between the grass and the gravel.
    —John
Chad Rutherford wrote:May 30, 2013
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Thank you, Chad! Unfortunately I don't remember the spacing on these. I'm going to guess it's around 10" - 11" on center; on this project I had given the carpenter latitude to evolve the design, and I think it was finalized on site.
    John
Rafer Evans wrote:May 23, 2013
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Rafer, all the wood was purchased as dimensioned lumber in stock lengths from a commercial yard, then cut to size.
    —John
lisajenkins84 wrote:Oct 25, 2012
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    I believe the middle rafter was toenailed (toescrewed?) into the beams, and the purlins toenailed (screwed) into the rafters.
    —John

What Houzzers are commenting on:

vchastin
vchastin added this to vchastin's ideasMay 10, 2019

Love the pergola over the outside patio

donna_miller3363664
Donna Miller added this to tx backyardJan 8, 2019

functional but i don't really like the look

Similar Ideas
Woodside Guest House
Backyard Pergola Shade Structures
The Copeland Residence
Winston Farm
Traditional Patio
Backyard Pergola Shade Structures
Inground Pools
Nancy Roy

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).