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SwampWhite.JPG Traditional Landscape, Omaha

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http://www.monarchgard.com/
Design ideas for a traditional landscaping in Omaha. — Houzz

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Great Design Plant: Milkweed
Botanical name: Asclepias sppCommon names: Swamp milkweed, showy milkweed, Sullivant's milkweedUSDA zones: 3 to 9, depending on species (find your zone)Light requirement: Full sun to some shadeMature size: 2 feet wide and 3 to 4 feet tallBenefits and tolerances: Spicy vanilla scent; attracts many butterflies; all varieties are somewhat adaptable to soil moistureSeasonal interest: Plenty of midsummer blooms followed by autumn puffs of seedsWhen to plant: Spring to midfallCultivars of swamp milkweed include this white-blooming 'Ice Ballet'. The scent is irresistible to monarch butterflies and many other winged insects, like beetles, moths and flies.
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to 7 Ecofriendly Gardening Ideas That Also Cut Chore Time
6. Plant insect-drawing perennials. While you're choosing berry-producing plants, don't forget about perennial flowers that draw insects (which are also the number-one food source for birds). Out here in the eastern Plains and Midwest, a variety of adapted native choices work best: liatris, Joe Pye Weed, coneflower, sunflower, mountain mint, aster, coreopsis and milkweed. Time to plant three perennials: 10 minutes
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Be a Butterfly Savior — Garden for the Monarchs
Monarch butterflies are probably one of the most visible summer butterflies — they’re hard to miss. In fall they migrate thousands of miles, from as far as southern Canada all the way to the oyamel forests in the mountains of central Mexico. These conifer woodlands protect the monarchs from most weather, and as the insects cluster together in massive dreadlocks of butterflies, they keep each other warm. In the winter of 2012 to 2013, monarchs occupied only about 3 acres in Mexico, and while that number represents millions of monarchs, it is also a record low.
Becky Harris added this to You Said It: ‘I Knew This Home Had to Be Mine’ and More Quotables
“As the last bits of habitat in the Midwest for wildlife like monarch butterflies are being removed, our gardens are becoming last refuges.” — Benjamin VogtLearn how you can help provide a refuge for these beautiful creatures (it’s easy) or, if you want to make more of a commitment, raise them yourself. Full story: Be a Butterfly Savior: Garden for the Monarchs
Becky Harris added this to How to Throw a Party Like You’re Prince
Get your garden ready for the butterflies. On New Girl, a monarch butterfly followed Prince around, even landing on his shoulder at his command. Make sure your garden is in top shape to welcome the monarchs.
Holm Design & Consulting LLC added this to Great Design Plant: Asclepias Verticillata
This is a larval host plant for monarch butterflies, and a large colony of this plant can provide an adequate supply of larval food for their caterpillars. Adult monarch butterflies regularly visit the flowers for nectar.
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Here’s What You Can Do for National Pollinator Week
Monarch butterflies are pollinators that need milkweed (Asclepias spp.) to reproduce.In 2007 the U.S. Senate unanimously approved one week in June each year to be National Pollinator Week. This year, National Pollinator Week takes place from June 19 to 25. Spearheaded by the Pollinator Partnership — a nonprofit dedicated to promoting and protecting pollinators and their ecosystems — cities, businesses, churches, schools and environmental groups around the country will celebrate with all manner of events. This week is a time to come together to help pollinators who not only are critical to our food supply, but who also help the flowers in our gardens, prairies, forests and deserts reproduce and thrive.
Laura Gaskill added this to 7 Ways to Make the Most of the Coming Fall Weekend
6. Say hello to migrating monarchs. Every fall, monarch butterflies make their way back to the same overwintering grounds — monarchs from the eastern coast of the United States migrate to Mexico, and butterflies from west of the Rocky Mountains return to coastal California. This month, those along the migratory paths may be able to spot monarchs on their way to warmer climates. And if you’re lucky enough to live within driving distance of Santa Cruz, California, you can visit the monarchs at Natural Bridges State Beach. Guided tours of the habitat are available on weekends starting in mid-October.Be a Butterfly Savior — Garden for the Monarchs
Lauren Dunec Design added this to Get the Kids Outside With Family-Friendly Backyard Ideas
8. Spark wonder. Inviting birds, frogs, butterflies and beneficial insects into the garden is a great way to inspire kids to be more connected with the natural world. Watch caterpillars morph into butterflies with an at-home monarch kit, hang a bird feeder outside the living room window or plant pollinator-friendly host plants and nectar flowers and watch to see who stops by the garden.Attract Hummingbirds and Bees With These Beautiful Summer Flowers
Laura Gaskill added this to This Weekend: Pumpkins, Mums, Monarchs and More
3. Wave to Migrating MonarchsMonarch butterflies are making their annual southward migration — and if you live near one of their resting stops (including Florida, Virginia, Texas, Kansas and Iowa) you may even be able to visit these colorful creatures at a stopping point on their long journey. Monarchs living west of the Rocky Mountains head for California to overwinter, congregating around Santa Cruz and San Diego beginning this month. Sadly, monarch populations have been declining due to habitat depletion in their nesting grounds in Mexico and loss of milkweed in the midwestern United States. We can all help the monarchs by planting nectar-rich flowers like blazing star, smooth aster or stiff goldenrod to fuel their tiring journey.Be a Butterfly Savior — Garden for the Monarchs

What Houzzers are commenting on:

Mary F added this to garden
Provide autumn nectar for butterflies plant for autumn nectar,Late-flying butterflies need a food source, so late-flowering perennials, such as Leucanthemella serotina, a tall, white daisy that flowers at the first frosts, Michaelmas daisies and herbaceous sedum are perfect to provide late flower colour in the garden and food for butterflies.”
mschif47 added this to Serenity
Love monarchs. Have many milkweed plants for them.
dmchapman07 added this to dmchapman07's ideas
One of the very best perennials to have in your garden is milkweed. I know that when most people hear the name, they cringe, grimace or turn up their nose, saying, "But isn't that a weed?" No, not really. And if it helps, we can call it wilkmeed. A magnet for insects, particularly butterflies and nonstinging bees, it is also a host plant for the monarch butterfly — a summer standby whose numbers are quickly dwindling as more farms and new housing developments are built, and more chemicals are being sprayed. Not only is milkweed a neat landscape plant from a design perspective, but it's also a hub for wildlife. A win-win! Traditional Landscape by Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens Botanical name: Asclepias spp Common names: Swamp milkweed, showy milkweed, Sullivant's milkweed USDA zones: 3 to 9, depending on species (find your zone) Light requirement: Full sun to some shade Mature size: 2 feet wide and 3 to 4 feet tall Benefits and tolerances: Spicy vanilla scent; attracts many butterflies; all varieties are somewhat adaptable to soil moisture Seasonal interest: Plenty of midsummer blooms followed by autumn puffs of seeds When to plant: Spring to midfall Cultivars of swamp milkweed include this white-blooming 'Ice Ballet'. The scent is irresistible to monarch butterflies and many other winged insects, like beetles, moths and flies. Landscape by Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens Milkweed seed pods are a sight to behold in autumn when the wind gets a hold of them. The pods dry, then crack, and dozens of seeds lift into the air like cotton. In fact, during World War II, milkweed fluff was used to fill pillows for GIs. And the milky sap can be applied to remove warts. Is there anything milkweed can't do? Try this plant in your garden and you
mab6047 added this to mab6047's ideas
Inviting birds, frogs, etc to yard.

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