Wine Country ModernContemporary Porch, San Francisco

Wine Country Modern

Inspiration for a large contemporary back porch remodel in San Francisco with decking and a roof extension —  Houzz
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This photo has 30 questions
blumcorc wrote:Mar 3, 2012
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Laura, your best bet would be to contact a NanaWall representative directly to find out cost information. There are a lot of things that need to be taken into consideration, including required structural work, material choice and different features for each type of door that will affect your total cost. Best of luck with your project!

    http://www.nanawall.com/contact
  • PRO
    NanaWall
    Hi Laura,

    Please contact your local representative Jim Huff to discuss your options: hsarchitectural@gmail.com; (404) 307-9737.
murphy61 wrote:Aug 13, 2013
Rhonnie K wrote:Nov 2, 2012
dirtyundies wrote:May 13, 2013
msk823 wrote:Apr 23, 2013
  • Kirstin Gayte
    would this look ok on the front of a house?
  • kanisha15
    Can u suggest a local builder in Dallas, tx
betheckhaus wrote:Nov 18, 2013
  • gimakathy
    Clean, open lines. LOVE it!
  • PRO
    Cocoweb
    The two painting can use some lighting like this one.
kdk8 wrote:Aug 28, 2015
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect

    Unfortunately there's no simple answer to that. The door products themselves run about $1k - $1.2k per lineal foot, which adds up fast. Creating the structural opening and repairing the envelope are the biggest variables that come into play. (Shear walls, beams, depending on the context, loads from above, etc.). You'll also need an exterior landing the full length of the opening.

    I suggest engaging a local architect and engineer to address these questions based on your specifics. An experienced builder could probably "ballpark" it for you. Goo dluck!




  • kdk8
    Thank you so much. That works for me.
kurtscott wrote:Jan 25, 2015
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    These are by Loewen (out of Cananda), but many (most?) mfrs. are offering these now.
  • deep41305

    We got ours from Nanawall. Great functionality and definitely worth the price

pbonaduce wrote:Sep 1, 2014
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    I'm sorry, but we can't help with that question. We have our hands full with earthquakes and fires out here in CA, but we're not up to speed on hurricane codes. You could check with the mfr. (Loewen, in this case) or similar mfrs. such as La Cantina, NanaWall, etc.
  • PRO
    NanaWall
    Hi Pbonaduce, our SL73 system is completely impact rated and miami-dade approved. Take a look at additional information here in regards to features, performance testing, options etc. : http://www.nanawall.com/products/sl73

    Here's a great letter that we received from a customer who watched hurricane sandy come in through their NanaWall system. "Fourteen foot waves crashed against our house for hours while the winds howled...Despite major damage sustained by our house, the NanaWall door in our living room held firm through the entire ordeal! The glass was not broken, the frame was not damaged, and the door remained closed and secure. We were amazed! " Continue reading: http://www.nanawall.com/blog/nanawall-sl73-super-storm-sandy
skiwert wrote:Jan 12, 2013
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Not galvanized or powder coated. As I recall it was shop-primed and epoxy painted in the field.
  • marthahk
    Can you give more details on what type of epoxy paint was used and how it was chosen? We are planning to build a similar steel structure and want to prevent rust as well as minimize the time until it needs repainting. Thanks!
Carol wrote:Sep 8, 2016
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect

    Hi, not that we are aware of. You're probably limited to aluminum clad wood like these Loewen products, all wood (custom?) , or all metal (Fleetwood, Western Window Systems, etc. ). Perhaps some European mfrs. make all fiberglass units. Good luck!

jignyapatel wrote:Aug 21, 2016
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect

    Hi - for large openings like this a horizontal rolling screen works best. They are usually third party "after-market" products (check Phantom and Centor), but many mfrs. are starting to integrate them into the door product.

laobhaoise wrote:Dec 24, 2015
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect

    Hi, these are Loewen doors from Glass Concepts in San Rafael, CA.

Tanya Perara wrote:Aug 26, 2015
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect

    Hi; not sure if you can see previous responses to this question. The structural elements are painted tube steel columns and steel I-beams. The wood slats are made with ipe.

ellennjoan wrote:Mar 14, 2015
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect

    That would be Earthtone Construction in Sebastopol. We can recommend them highly.


alvarojota wrote:Mar 3, 2015
johannjdekker wrote:Oct 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    It's ipe, and it would have been sourced locally by the contractor, Earthtone Construction of Sebastopol CA.
Teri wrote:Jun 30, 2014
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Actually in the CA wine country bugs are not a huge problem. The owners elected to forego rolling screens, which mount vertically on the interior side of the door jambs.
lilibethc2002 wrote:Aug 21, 2013
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Thanks for your question. The structure was fabricated by Architectural and Structural Steel Company in Santa Rosa, CA. Best of luck with your upcoming project!
zumuy wrote:Jun 12, 2013
lhagstrom wrote:Dec 18, 2012
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Thanks for your question. The deck is made of Ipe. Best of luck with your future projects!
mike2204 wrote:Sep 23, 2012
lilhalo76 wrote:Sep 4, 2012
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Thanks for inquiring. We didn't spec that, so I am sorry i don't have the info to share.
chellaigne wrote:Apr 5, 2012
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Nothing quite so innovative, I'm afraid: the house itself is conventional wood frame, and the trellis is steel tube (painted) and ipe wood slats - all field built. This picture shows one wing of an L-shaped plan that orients to the rear yard.

    Thanks for asking...
redoit wrote:Mar 18, 2012
  • PRO
    Lorin Hill, Architect
    Thank you for asking. It's actually a custom-fabricated assembly: painted structural steel (square tube columns with small I-beams and a channel fascia) with custom wood slats/palettes made of ipe.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

anniekendall
Annie Thornton added this to 100 Homes Around the U.S. Say Happy Fourth of July!Jun 28, 2017

64. Calistoga, California

sam70
Samantha Schoech added this to Open Walls Widen Home PossibilitiesMay 30, 2012

Creating a small breezeway between the house and the open air can keep a room from getting too hot in the summer. It also provides a nice visual transition between inside and out.

becky
Becky Harris added this to Porch Life: Modern Porches Step It UpApr 1, 2012

This back porch, paired with folding doors that open completely, erase the boundary between indoors and out. The porch is the transitional space between the two.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

kellyodello
kellyodello added this to Indoor/Outsoor Living AreaAug 9, 2019

Large sliding doors porch cover, actual porch

letusallxl
Jim added this to letusallxl's ideasAug 3, 2019

Could convert a nice back door into a sliding door opening to yard

susaneo
Susan Harmon added this to Dry CreekAug 2, 2019

Like covered patio space. Is this too modern?

katlow
katlow added this to A Contractors photo bookJul 15, 2019

height of room, pano doors, steps...

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