Jay Sifford Garden Design
35 Reviews

Noda Project #2

The project scope was to redesign the front yard of this historic 100+ year old mill house located in a revitalized area of Charlotte. The lawn was replaced with a matrix planting of shrubs, ornamental grasses, specimen trees and perennials. Each plant choice earns its place in the design by pulling hues from the home and hardscape or adding texture to the mix.
Project Year: 2016
Project Cost: $10,001 - $25,000
Country: United States
Before Photo
Noda Project #2
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Photo by Jay Sifford
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Before Photo
Noda Project #2
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Photo by Jay Sifford
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Before Photo
Noda Project #2
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Photo by Jay Sifford
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Noda Project #2
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'Cheyenne Sky' panicum creates a unique foundation planting while providing texture and pulling hues from the new slab stone sidewalk/terrace in the front yard. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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The large slabs of stone replaced the outdated pavers that once comprised the sidewalk. Raised slabs of the same stone create a bench and add a third dimension to the sidewalk. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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A matrix planting of herbs, perennials, ornamental grasses and shrubs creates interest in a front yard that was previously covered in turf and weeds. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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'Autumn Joy' sedum adds texture and pulls complementary hues from the home and the stone. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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The new front yard planting decreases maintenance while adding textural and colorful interest. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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A contorted filbert anchors the hardscape near the front door. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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A cut in boulder, along with creeping rosemary, 'Firewitch' dianthus and a contorted filbert add textural interest as well as fragrance to the home's entryway. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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'Cheyenne Sky' panicum (switchgrass) creates a unique foundation planting for the front of the home. It's hues pull from the stone sidewalk while it brings texture to the front yard. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Noda Project #2
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New window boxes filled with sedums add color and texture to the front of the home. Photo by Jay Sifford.
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Russian sage and Ninebark.
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Sedum in front garden.
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Side View of Front Garden, 2 Years After Install
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Water-wise and Pollinator Friendly.
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Lots of Texture.
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'Cheyenne Sky' panicum plays well with flagstone sidewalk.
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Rosemary and dianthus soften hardscape.
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Front garden, 2 years after installation.
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New front sidewalk, softened by textural plantings.
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Lots of texture.
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Photo by Jay Sifford.
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New front garden.
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New front garden, 2 years after installation.
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Front door from street view.
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Sidewalk to front door.
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