bpatlinden

What's a Chesser?

bpath
2 years ago

A tv commercial taught me a new word today: chesser. They showed what I would call a chest of drawers; a previously-referenced dresser was on the other side of the bed.

So I looked it up. I found images that look like a combined dresser and chest, like this:

Or this:

But also plenty of this:

That last one looks more like a dresser to me. Is there a standard definition for a "chesser"?

Comments (20)

  • bpath
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Ha ha, "Chester drawers" always makes me laugh, along with "rod iron". But "chesser" appears to be an actual thing, but inconsistently applied. Ah, maybe it's a regression of sorts: "chest of drawers" to "chester drawers" to "chesser"?

    Best Answer
  • ghostlyvision
    2 years ago

    Not that I'm aware of but I see "Chester drawers" on Craig's List frequently enough to make me think there are furniture terms I just haven't been acquainted with.

  • FinallyHome
    2 years ago

    My grandmother used the term "chester drawers".

  • blfenton
    2 years ago

    I've never heard the term before. We just call it a dresser, which is a funny enough word as it is.

  • bpath
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Blfenton, you call even the combo piece, with a low side and a tall side, a dresser?

  • palimpsest
    2 years ago

    I'd call it weird.

  • mdln
    2 years ago

    I purchased what the High Point NC designer called a "chesser." It is a cross between a chest and a dresser; taller than a dresser, but shorter and wider then a chest.

  • palimpsest
    2 years ago

    "Chest of drawers" is a correct term, even if it gets pronounced chester drawers or chestadrawers or chestadraws. It's a chest that has drawers instead of a lid on top.

    We called a table height chest of drawers a dresser or a bureau, and a taller one a chest of drawers, lingerie chest (tall and thin) or highboy (very high with legs usually)

  • mdln
    2 years ago
    "chesser"
  • palimpsest
    2 years ago

    "Chesty Morgan"

  • jakabedy
    2 years ago

  • justerrilynn
    2 years ago

    Wow, is ...is that a gun in his pocket?

  • bpath
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Nope, just glad to...oh dear, this thread is devolving lol!

    well, I'm just glad to know I'm not the only one confused by the word chesser. I think the combo piece of furniture is interesting, could be useful in a small space. The commercial I saw is for Bob's Discount Furniture, which probably explains a lot.

  • edenchild
    2 years ago
    Chesser actually makes sense given the photos you included, bpathome. Maybe it’s the decorating equivalent of “brunch”?

    Perhaps Houzz should start a glossary of terms, especially commonly misspelled ones like rod iron, dinning rooms and Chester drawers.
  • justerrilynn
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Well, in decorating you wouldn't put a Chesser in the same room as a Omnibusser.

    Chesser's are well suited for a bedroom with a Trinner.

    Okay, so I'm making up my own words : )

  • grapefruit1_ar
    2 years ago

    Along this line, I sometimes see someone say that a furniture piece has 4 " draws". Have you seen or heard this?

  • cawaps
    2 years ago

    I thought "draws" was a New England pronunciation of drawers. Norm Abrams of New Yankee Workshop says draws.

  • lovemrmewey
    2 years ago

    'Dinning' and 'rod' just put my teeth on edge.

  • grapefruit1_ar
    2 years ago

    Cawapps....I agree when it is said, but it is written as " draws" , these people are not from New England.

  • Bunny
    2 years ago

    On GW you see "draws" and "dinning" all the time. Annoying, but nowhere as bad as "walla!"