mjammjam

Brand New Quartzite: ALREADY STAINED!

mjammjam
2 years ago
last modified: 2 years ago

I am totally shocked. I beat this sample with a screwdriver and it wouldn't scratch. Fabricator and slab yard told me this was the strongest quartzite. What do I do now? It was installed and sealed last week I'm still waiting on the delivery of the island counter (that they cracked on the way over and had to order another)


Some raspberries were left on the counter and now there's some pink stains.....

I am beyond devastated--


Today, my fabricator brought me a slab to use to find backsplash . Just used peanut butter and soy sauce:

Here is the result


If I had any strength left, I would find it to cry

Comments (356)

  • mjammjam
    Original Author
    last year

    HAHA Joseph - Catzpeedonit .

    I thought I did my homework. I've lived with warped formica counters for the last 25 years. I finally graduated to quartz a few years ago, but started planning My Dream Kitchen when I finally moved a year ago. I looked at hundreds of photos and was impressed by how beautiful and durable quartzite was. I searched the stone yards and was told quartzite was stronger than granite. I did my own scratch test (With a screwdriver) and was sure it was strong. I assumed the fabricator would seal it so that at least water wouldn't leave a permanent stain. But, he obviously didn't use the right product.

    What I meant was --- Should I know to ask a fabricator if his sealer is high quality? Should I have asked my contractor if he has an extra phone charger so he can see my texts from his phone that's always on 6%? Should I have asked if the contractor's crew will keep my front door closed so my dog doesn't run away? Would I know to ask in advance if my kitchen cabinets should be centered on the wall? To me these things are givens. I can go on and on and on

  • ElleN
    last year
    Yeah, no. Choosing a quartz that then isn't incorrectly sealed isn't an "unreasonable love" problem. It's a "professionals failed to do their job" problem. The only true unreasonable love scenario I can think of is using marble counters for your art studio. Other than that, most commonly available countertop choices are either fit for the job themselves, or can be readily prepped using commonly available tools like sealers.
    Consumers can't possibly know every potential problem which is why they pay professionals. That slab at the stone yard costs more because with it comes an experienced professional who has to pay to make things right if they go wrong- aka has a vested interest in making sure you're making a smart choice.

    Saying a stone is inadequate because it needs a sealer is like saying toast is inadequate because it tastes better with peanut butter. Or wood floors are a bad choice because they need stain and refinishing occasionally.
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  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last year
    last modified: last year

    ElleN:

    I agree to a certain extent. The problem is that the stoners keep selling more exotic and unsuitable-for-countertops stone. I've walked away from some repairs because once I touched it, the problems became mine. This crap was a crumbling but beautiful mess. This cost me several hours, but I like to know when my beating will end.

  • ElleN
    last year
    Joseph, this is a thread about quartz. Quartz is not one of those exceptions.
  • chispa
    last year

    Ellen, just so any future readers don't get confused or take away the wrong information --- this is a thread about QUARTZITE not quartz.

    Quartz is man made.

    Quartzite is a natural stone (like granite and marble)

  • carladr
    last year
    I’ve been following this thread since we have recently had White Princess quartzite installed. I hope you know how many people you are helping by sharing your experiences. FWIW, our fabricator sealed our slabs before they were cut, after they were cut and they will be sealed one more time before we move in.
  • Peke
    last year

    Seven years with Sea Pearl Quartzite with original sealant. Grandkids left red Kool-aid on the brushed quartzite and I didn't see the red until 2 days later. Yes, there was crap on our island. It is a catch all when remodeling. Anyway, the red came out. I do need to reseal the quartzite though. I love the brushed texture. I hate shiny countertops for me.

    I have fallen in love with Wild Sea for my bathrooms.

  • mjammjam
    Original Author
    last year

    Wow- That is one Crazy Gorgeous Slab!

  • Konrad Link
    last year
    mjammjam :

    the problem is not with the sealer

    these slabs were acid washed in the country of origin to remove natural gold color infiltrations.

    the acid washed open the pores of the stone, it will be subject to staining.

    any slab from this same lot will same problem, some will have less, (if they were better washed with pressure water after the acid for example...)

    it is a true beautiful quartzite, but during the process immersed in acid in an attempt to remove natural gold color infiltrations
  • mjammjam
    Original Author
    last year

    Thank you, Konrad -- I have this installed and have had it sealed a few times. So far - so good, but I see some areas that get water marks that go away as it dries. Hopefully, I won't see anything else that will make me miserable -- This reno project has been torture even though I've done so much homework to prevent it....

  • Peke
    last year

    I meant to mention that some sealers slightly change the color of the stone, so try the sealer on a sample piece first.

  • Maru, 5b
    last year
    I didn’t know about quartzite countertops until I came across this thread. So, it’s more like granite countertops in that it’s just stone, not mixed with anything? ...that then makes it porous ... so it requires periodic sealing...


    If you’re thinking of a low-maintenance material change in the future, I’d go for quartz. The quartz countertops, as you all probably already know, are not pure quartz. They’re quartz bits mixed in with resin which gives it its nonporous property.

    Ours is Cosentino Silestone and we’ve had them for 15 years. Never requires sealing. Doesn’t stain. I use paint scrapers, steel wool on it. My kitchen counters do multiple duties - food prep, laundry prep, woodworking, painting, staining, sewing, crafts, soldering, etc. They’ve met all kinds of liquids, solvents.

    There’s one very tiny shallow chip (on one edge over a drawer) that I can feel when I run my finger over it. The edges around the sink feel a bit rough compared to the general smoothness of quartz. That’s to be expected. It’s a very busy sink. I don’t mind it. It’s aging gracefully, IMO.

    I think the OP said he/she doesn’t like quartz because it’s shiny (might not be the right word I read. It was many postings ago. ) maybe it’s just when it’s new. Ours certainly isn’t shiny.
  • Chessie
    last year

    Polished quartz doesn't dull. It DOES stay shiny. That's kinda the whole point.

  • carladr
    last year

    Hi mjammjam, checking in to see how your stone doing is doing and also if you have found any cleaning products that you like. We just had white quartzite installed in our kitchen.

  • suray2klim
    5 months ago

    Last week, I had beautiful white quartzite countertops installed in my not-yet-finished renovated kitchen. One night after the new dishwasher was installed I noticed two dark round “stains” appeared. I asked the fabricator and was told to try Miracle Poultice. I followed the instructions fully and waited the obligatory 48 hours. I removed the tape and plastic wrap to find that the stains are now bigger. I’m crying right now. I don’t know what to try next. Help!

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    5 months ago

    suray Is it water ? if the stone isn't properly sealed to where water beads up, the water will become absorbed and make 'dark spots'.

    Have no idea what your stone is (how do you know it's real quartzite?) or what sealer was used on it. A poultice is for oil stains or other stains. what did you tell your fabricator is was that he recommenced a poultice?

    start your own post w/pictures

  • suray2klim
    5 months ago

    Beth, it’s not water because the faucet wasn’t installed and the dishwasher wasn’t hooked up to the water yet. In fact, the water was just turned on today. The stains “appeared” overnight. I bought the slabs at a stone yard recommended by the contractor. It was labeled quartzite and the salesperson showed me the difference in the many types of slabs available for me to choose from. I don’t know what sealer was used. I told the fabricator exactly what I wrote here and showed him a picture of the two stains. Hence, his recommendation to try the poultice.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    5 months ago

    I don't know how the stoners sleep at night.

  • barncatz
    5 months ago

    suray, beth is right. Please start a thread and post photos.

  • DavidR
    5 months ago

    Good old Formica is WAY less hassle. Much cheaper, too.

  • kazmom
    5 months ago

    We love our granite and it is zero hassle. We have had it for almost 2 years now, no stains. The granite we had at our old house for 10 years was also no hassle. People come to these boards for solutions so you see the problems. Most people have no issues with their stone counters. Plus they last forever and are beautiful.

  • Kris G
    2 months ago

    Suray did you get a resolution? We selected a quartzite (lavezzi) from a stone yard recommended by our fabricator as well. 2 weeks ago we went to do a final approval of slabs before install. I took pictures etc and slabs were in excellent condition.
    The day we were installed we went by a few hours after to see them. I noticed dark circles and some splotching. I took pictures and sent to our builder.
    He has been working the last week talking to the fabricator and stone yard to figure out what’s going on.
    Fabricator said it might have been trapped moister so they removed sealer and applied heat gun. It didn’t make a difference so most likely not water.
    I am not being told that it is a “phenomenon”
    I’m just so confused as to how the stone went from looking normal to having these dark spots over night.
    I went with quartzite and paid the extra price because I was warned against going with marble. I was told that quartzite was more durable. Now here we are and before we even get a chance to move in it’s doing this!
    I’m so frustrated!
    Anybody get any resolution?

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    2 months ago

    Kris, what adhesive did they use to attach the countertop? and what 'quartzite' is it? pic?

  • Kris G
    2 months ago

    Hey Beth- I don’t know the adhesive used. I’m going to ask tomorrow.
    It is Lavezzi Quartzite.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    never heard of that. does it look like this? I'm betting you have more of a marble and not a true quartzite. but I don't know this piece.


    did you do the stain/etch test and glass scratch test on it?

  • Kris G
    2 months ago

    That looks similar to the lavezzi and also the white pearl that we have in the master bath. But no spots on the white pearl in the master bath. Attached are the slabs when they arrived for me to approve them.
    I unfortunately didn’t do the scratch test. I was naive and took their word for it. 😫 They sure did charge me quartzite price! How can they sell you something and label it as something it’s not. I’m so disgusted.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    2 months ago

    are these slabs the same type? they have diff names.

    do you have any left over pieces? anything you could test.

  • Kris G
    2 months ago

    Those are our slabs before installed- the top is white pearl quartzite that we used in our master bath and the bottom is lavezzi quartzite that we used throughout the rest of the house. The lavezzi is the one that has the stains on them on our island and one other spot on the counter .
    I’m not sure if they left any remnant pieces at the house. Going to ask and go look.

  • Kris G
    2 months ago

    I’m looking up now how apparently it’s common practice for stone yards to sell stones labeled as different material.
    How is that legal?!?

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    2 months ago

    good question. Super White was sold as quartzite (and still is) for many years. it's a dolomite. Most of the quartzite being sold isn't a true quartzite. true quartzite won't stain, won't etch and glass won't scratch it. Marble is the opposite.

    maybe they think people won't do their homework and they can get away w/mislabeling? or maybe they're ignorant and really don't know?

  • Kris G
    2 months ago

    So frustrating! We didn’t even get in the house to etch it ourselves. The installers were there last Tuesday to install- because of covid they asked for no one to be in the house with them so no other subs were there. When they left we entered and saw the spots. We immediately took a picture and sent to our builder. There is no running water in the house, etc.
    I’m just so confused as to how the spots got there- and the response of it’s just a “phenomenon” doesn’t sit well with me. Know what I mean?! I compared it to buying a new car- you expect to leave the lot with it in mint condition and you will be the one to put miles and dings on it. Well we just bought this “new car” and it didn’t arrive in mint condition.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    yeah, that's BS. phenomena doesn't really help you! You paid in full?? You need to also speak to a supervisor in charge of fabrication and or the install. you do. if you builder does it, it's like playing a game of telephone. who knows what anyone says?

    i will tell you that a lot of those spots are from adhesive or from water absorption. since you were n't there to watch, (and I would have told them no way in hell I'm not going to observe. what a joke, them using this virus so you can't see what they're doing. there is no proof that you can't be in the house while their installing, especially if you wear a mask. but don't even get me started on this nonsense) how can you know what they did or didn't do? Plus, you don't even know what, if anything, was already on the slab when they brought it in the house?

  • Peke
    last month

    I agree. It seems like I have to watch constantly or something gets done wrong or short cuts are taken. Here is a picture of something I didn't see the fabricators do until we removed the bathroom sheetrock. The kitchen counter of about 30" width was cut too wide, so they decided to cut into my sheetrock to make it fit. The gray quartzite is sticking through the drywall about a half inch. Now I have no way to seal it except with caulk.


    Keep bugging them. Squeaky wheel...


  • dotsandstripes 123
    last month

    I feel your pain. We moved into our custom home 1.5 years ago and are still trying to get our contractor to come back and fix things on our original punch list. We are no longer the bright shiny thing and he is trying to please his new customers. Fortunately, we have held back money and so still have hope he will get everything fixed, but honestly we should have held back more. Ironically, he still says how much he values us and wants us as a reference! My advice is to definitely keep bugging them and document every statement/decision/explanation you are given.

  • Peke
    last month

    At this point I would not be a good reference for anyone. I am so exasperated.

  • Nelly1414
    last month
    last modified: last month

    mjammjam thank you for documenting your issues and journey with your infinity white quartzite! I am pretty certain that I have the same counters as yours as they look identical to mine, which is also a different look then other infinity white quartzite I have seen, making me wonder if it is really inifinity white quartzite?


    Anyhow my counters are only 3 weeks old and I am experiencing similar issues ): Luckly no major stains have set in been yet, but we had some close calls, and do have a few around the stove. I have 4 kids all under 10 so I am stressed out about the future of these counters, I can’t enjoy our new kitchen! we also have several some light surface glossy imperfections all over, almost looks like the sealer is rubbing and scratching off?? I attached one image example.. I have been trying to get the fabricator over here to discuss these issues along with some chipping on the edges that were here since installation day also. However it has been 3weeks and he is a no show! This last Friday I sent him a video of the counters and issues since he was not making it a priority and clearly didn’t know all the issues we were having, so that did prompt him to set an appointment with us! He is suppose to be here this week on Tuesday or Wednesday so we shall see. I don’t know what sealer was used originally, if any, I was passed on a comment from my fabricator that “they come pre-sealed and don’t need more sealer, but I will do one for peace of mind.” clearly that plan is not working, so I sent him the 511 sealer that you said is working for yours...and he said he has something better...but I’m nervous about that, if the 511 works I want to tell him to just use that! Also if a sealer is already on them does that need to be stripped off? I am trying to breath and not freak out but I wanted to share me experience as well to bring more awareness to this type of “quartzite”.

    the photos attached with this post were taken on clean counters that were cleaned with only dawn dish soap and water about an hour prior.

    I would love any advise on what the glossy imperfections are? I am also looking for guidance on how to steer the conversation with the fabricator. As he already told my contractor “he only installed them, he is it liable for stains ect. However he is willing to try and help me seal I more”. So I am trying to decide what I am going to fight for? I feel like they need buffed out and repolished and sealer applied with the 3 coat process. Any other suggestions are much appreciated!!





  • BlueberryBundtcake - 6a/MA
    last month

    Here would be my theory on how disappointing stones get sold as quartzite:


    Quartzite, geologically speaking, is a metamorphic rock transformed from sandstone. It is predominantly quartz, but how much quartz would depend on the sandstone pre-metamorphism. Sandstone's quartz content can vary, so it follows that the quartz content after metamorphism would also vary. Even if only quartz-rich sandstones are deemed to have become quartzite, that's not a set formula, so there will be variation.

    Marble is also metamorphic, but it starts its existence as limestone, which is made mostly of calcite, so marble is, of course, mostly calcite. It will also contain various other minerals, including quartz, but calcite is the main component.

    If there's some magnesium in the mix, so the rock is made of dolomite instead of calcite, then it's the slightly harder dolomite undergoing metamorphism instead of limestone, and the result is dolomitic marble, which like the sedimentary rock it was made from, is a bit harder than its calcite-based relation.


    What does all that mean for countertops? Well, it means marble will be softest and probe to etching, since it's mostly calcite; dolomitic marble will be a little more rough and tumble because dolomite is harder than calcite. Quartzite is quartz-rich, but that doesn't make all quartzites equally durable, just more durable. If the stone started out as quartz-rich sandstone, they can call it quartzite geologically ... it doesn't have to live up to expectations based on other quartzite countertops. Short of testing the slab's mineral content or knowing the stone's metamorphic history, how it reacts in tests of durability and porosity doesn't seem to necessarily prove whether a piece of stone is technically quartzite, just whether the slab possesses the level of quartz that is needed to provide the desired qualities for the countertop. So I would say that failing would indicate a potentially lower quartz content, but I suspect a stone can fail some tests and still technically qualify as quartzite ... and if it's technically quartzite, you can bet they'll sell it as such, even if it might not live up to everyone's expectations.


    I'm not an expert or a geologist, but it seems like there's enough variation in rocks deemed to be the same material to provide the wiggle room for boosted sales and for disappointment. I could be totally out in left field.

  • Peke
    last month

    Nelly, can you ask him to use a quartzite scrap to try his sealer and the one you chose? My fabricator used a different sealer on the perimeter counter than the island. The perimeter counter is more yellowed.


    Blueberry, you are right. I think when everybody started looking for quartzite slabs, the fabricators saw a cash cow...meaning they could use "lesser" quartzite that is not quartzite, buy it much cheaper, and cut it easier since it is not quartzite, then charge quartzite prices for cutting. And then, some of the places were just uninformed about quartzite. Benefit of the doubt given...

  • Emma Ann
    last month

    Hi all! I bought Mont Blanc quartzite and it was installed in April. My good friend bought the exact same slabs of Mont Blanc as I did. Same lot of 9 slabs from same place. I took 3 of them and she took 3 of them. We used two different fabricators. She has had 0 issues with hers. No stains so issues at all. I have had issues and stains from day 1. Stains that came with the stone at installation. Our fabricator came out and was able to remove some stains. He the sealed them again with 3 rounds of More lifetime sealer. Well, we are almost 3 weeks from when they sealed them again and still getting water stains and now have oil stains from my daughter leaving the vegetable oil top on the counter for no more than 30 minutes. I do believe that some installers know what sealers to use on what quartzites. My friends obviously knew more about the type Mont Blanc was and my installer treated it like Taj Mahal. So I’m now in the process of having the More rep come out and try and remove the stains, blah blah blah. It’s so frustrating and such a waste of my time.

  • Emma Ann
    last month

    Here is the nice oil stain from today.

  • Emma Ann
    last month

    Here are my mystery stains that came with the install that the fabricator and my contractor are trying to say are natural from the stone.

  • Emma Ann
    last month

    I’m calling my friends installer Monday to find out how hers were sealed and what product. Hoping to do the same thing and it fixes the issue.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    last month
    last modified: last month

    H Rein, good idea. (about asking your friend. maybe tell your fabricator to talk to her guys too) Mont Blanc has a lot of issues. Perhaps not a true quartzite? (true quartzite will not stain or etch)

    Mont Blanc is a marble (but has a diff look *mostly gray/white**, and then they have a Mont Blanc quartzite, which looks like yours. (did you do the lemon juice test and glass tile scratch test before you purchased it? )

    BTW, those 'mystery' stains are not normal (were they there when you picked out the slab?? no) during the cutting process, sometimes water tainted w/other solvents will drip onto your slab and cause issues. or maybe during the transport something got on them. In any case, they occurred because of whatever they were doing w/your slab caused it. It's not your fault and it's not 'normal'. You should be compensated for it IF they can't fully remove them.

  • chispa
    last month

    Nelly & H Rein, you should start your own threads documenting your issues. This is a really long and older thread and it means many won't read all the way down to get to your issues.

  • suray2klim
    last month

    It’s awful that we, as consumers, have to go through so much frustration and costs, when all we want is beautiful countertops and are willing to pay the price for quartzite. Where is the integrity in the industry? Why can’t we trust that what we are buying is actually quartzite? Why can’t I trust the fabricator/installer to know which sealer and adhesive to use? I’m not a professional and have no idea of the answers, yet in all cases when I ask about why there are stains on my countertop, I am asked those same questions. I’m just venting and know there are no answers. I will continue to enjoy my beautiful new kitchen and try to ignore the elephant in the room......stains on my countertop.

  • Chessie
    last month

    " all we want is beautiful countertops and are willing to pay the price for quartzite "


    That is why. There will always ALWAYS be people trying to take advantage of that.

  • Emma Ann
    last month

    I tried the acetone and baking soda poultice on the oil stain and it made it worse. I have a ring from where the edge of the poultice was. Any thoughts on how to fix this??? 😫 it also didn’t remove the oil stain.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    suraytoklim:


    We Corian fabricators were telling consumers over a decade ago about the problems inherent in natural stone. But no, like a wayward daughter in love with the bad boy biker at the bar, you wanted hard and shiny and turned deaf ears to our pleas. We told you Corian never, ever, bled at built up edges. We told you it was virtually stainproof and repairable.


    No. You were warned repeatedly. Now own up. It's all we can do to hold our "I-told-you-sos" inside. We don't wanna hear it.

  • suray2klim
    last month

    Thanks, Joseph Corbett, LLC. for your comment. I have been in love with the good boy, Corian, for 25 years and had it in several homes. Only a couple of problems over the years. One, a caterer put a hot pot on the counter and it burned a spot. The other, several scratches when a cutting board wasn’t used. Both, were because of mistakes. However, all contractors (there were 10) that bid on my renovation had the same recommendation....if you want heat and scratch resistant, go with natural stone. So, I went with the bad boy biker and have to live with my decision, as I did when choosing Corian. Owning up!

  • Timi M
    last month

    Nothing better than quartz composite countertops (e.g., Silestone). No stains, no chips, no problems ever.

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