bart_2015

How long does it take for hip to heal?

bart_2015
June 22, 2018

Hi, everyone. This post is especially directed to any of you out there who has had a hip replacement. I am scheduled to have my right hip replaced,and none too soon,believe me! I'm "only" 59 years old,but by now am quite disabled by this hip.

My garden is out in the woods, far from my home,on very steep, sloping land. Needless to say, I am in some anxiety as to how long it will take after the operation to heal sufficiently to get back to work. Obviously I'll be able to do light jobs sooner, but how long will I have to wait until I can once more dig and carry heavy bags of organic matter, soil, etc? Of course, everyone is different and has their own rate of healing, but I would be very grateful to hear other people's experiences. Thanks in advance! bart

Comments (33)

  • rbehs

    I have a friend who needed her hip replaced in her forties. I think it took her three months to get back to normal, and now she is back to some vigorous hiking.

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  • Lisa Adams

    Oh Bart! You’re going to get some great answers here, I know! I have just been told that I need a new left hip as well. (at 50). I have already had many here reach out and explain their experience with the surgery. I can’t give you any advice, but I’ll be listening here with open ears. I hope you don’t mind if I might jump in and ask questions, too. I’m hoping to put mine off until cooler weather, so call or winter. I’m SO glad you posted this. Hang in there. We can later compare our battle stories:). Lisa

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  • Lisa Adams

    Bart, you see my thread entitled “Around the garden 6/16/18”? I’m hoping both Mary and Cynthia with both see this. They’ve both had it done, and can provide info. Mary messaged me and thoroughly explained her entire experience. I’m actually feeling much less apprehensive about the surgery, now. Both are very happy with their results, and apparently the surgery and recovery wasn’t bad, much easier than the knee replacement. Lisa

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  • boncrow66

    I work in a inpatient rehab for physical therapy and while I am not a therapist I can tell you that you should be back to normal in 3-4 months and that the key to a successful recovery is to move and do your therapy and take your pain meds when needed, if your in pain you are not going to want to get up and move. Good luck and keep us posted on how your doing! I think you will be glad you had it done when you are able to get around better. Same goes for you too Lisa!

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  • maryc_gwSoCA/USDA10

    Me and my new hip totally agree with boncrow. I was reluctant about the pain meds after the initial week but they convinced me I'd recover quicker and afterwards i could tell they were right - it really helped me out more info my exercises.(NOTE Edit: Originally this said: "...helped me put more into my exercises" I swear it was okay before I hit the submit Guess its confused shorthand for "Put more in to get more out"}

    Cynthia (other thread) is absolutely right - anterior is the way to go. Recovery is easier and faster. My older brother had his 2nd hip replaced a few years ago the older traditional way and I could really tell the difference. And he always and forever has to watch the angle of his bending. Not so for anterior replacement.

    I don't have experience with hill climbing with heavy bags. My back has been and off issue for years so I've had to come up with confirm an accommodation for heavy - over 15 - 20lbs way before hip pain entered the picture. I'm in a mobile home park so basically level.

    But I too say sooner is better than later. I figured the longer i waited the further everything else would deteriorate and I wanted to move while I still could. I was 69 at the time so wanted make the best of time i still had.

    Recovery was way better than I expected. They had me walking a little the afternoon of the surgery. I was practicing stairs the next day ,which I needed to be able to do to go home. Surgery was Tuesday, home on Thursday morning, physical therapy started the following Monday. Me and the walker were able to do hand watering of the yard and roses somewhere around 7 to 10 days. Smallish yard but it takes me about an hour when everything is working properly.

    And to be clear, I'm not a super active person to begin with and carry way too much weight. And I was able to recover much easier and quicker than I expected.

    Let me know if you have any further questions, though I realize I can't answer you most important ones about heavy lifting and slopes.

    MaryC

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  • boncrow66

    Mary made a good point about not putting the surgery off and it causing other issues, one issue is that the other hip will start hurting because you’re compensating for the actual hip that is bad so then you end up with two bad hips.

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  • portlandmysteryrose

    Bart and Lisa, I have not had hip replacement surgery, but a number of friends and relatives have. Their experiences fell along the lines of Boncrow's report (3-4 months) except for a couple who were in their mid 70s and not (ahem) hard working gardeners or even avid walkers or swimmers. Maybe 6-8 months before the septuagenarians were lifting and dragging objects as usual? My friends and relatives were also encouraged by their doctors not to postpone and were glad they chose to get the surgery over with before they began to overburden the other side. Carol

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  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    My husband had a L hip resurfacing in Belgium in 2004 at age 53, with Dr. Koen DeSmet. He is very satisfied and can do everything including gardening and heavy backpacking and hiking in the Grand Canyon. All in all it was very successful and he recommends hip resurfacing if at all possible. Resurfaced hips are almost impossible to dislocate. He was hiking two months after surgery. He had to change a tire on his Suburban two weeks after surgery which he did without a problem.

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  • nippstress - zone 5 Nebraska

    Bart, I totally understand what you mean about being very disabled by the hip in its present condition. I couldn't sit, sleep, stand or walk without pain in the last 6 months or so before I had mine done, and I have a pretty high pain tolerance. I'm pretty active - I exercise about 2 hours a day (half aerobic, half toning) and I teach a Pilates class for fun - but nothing in the cortizone shots or PT exercises made enough of a difference to last. This was at about 52 for me, which I agree is young for a total hip replacement, but I have hereditary arthritis so it was inevitable.

    Let me echo the other comments first then get back to your more specific questions of timeline. Do insist on the anterior rather than posterior incision, since the posterior one has a lifetime restriction on bending forward that is simply not realistic for a gardener. Get a prescription to go to a physical therapist NOW, before the surgery, to build your muscle structure ahead of time and start to correct behavior habits you've gotten into to spare the hip. I had a tremendous "sailor's list" when I walked that I wasn't even aware of, and being more conscious of how I held myself and stepped before surgery was really helpful so that I could get back to a normal gait more quickly afterward. Yep - Mary and Boncrow are right that the risks of injuring other body parts in these inappropriate movement patterns are reasons not to put things off (not to mention the pain). I didn't really need PT after the surgery that way, since they basically said just to keep up the postural monitoring and walking as therapy for the hip.

    The surgery itself really wasn't bad. I was apprehensive about it, and I'd read about people needing lift seats on the toilet or being immobilized for weeks or even months afterward that sounded scary. Basically, my doctor had some kind of anesthetic with delayed reaction into the hip that lasted for 72 hours, and that kept me from needing any pain medication whatsoever, since by the time it wore off I was just a little tender at the incision site itself. I was in the hospital about a day and a half, and by the time I got home I could easily get myself around my house without fuss, though I used my walker to ease my husband's worries. Toilets were not a problem as long as there was a handy counter to use for a little boost up, and I did use the floor grabbers for a week or two around the house. Oh, speaking of toilets do be sure to drink plenty of water when you get home to avoid low blood pressure crashes - my first night home I did the embarrassing old person thing of falling disoriented off the toilet, and apparently it was a limited fluid/blood pressure thing that was easily fixable. The only thing I needed my husband's help with was putting on socks and pants for the first week or two, and even with that I worked out a system by the end of the first week on my own. I carried my walker with me for maybe 2 weeks if I were going a longer distance (more than a few blocks), but by my 2 week checkout I was walking pretty much normally without noticeable pain if I was careful.

    Now, for the rest of your questions about the remaining recovery process. You have to manage the incision till it heals for about 4-6 weeks or so as I recall, but certainly after 2 weeks I was able to walk wherever I had normally walked as long as I was careful, though not yet walking long distances for specific exercise. That means that if you're used to walking your land now, within a couple of weeks you should be able to walk to the site and do gentle garden tending. I did use my garden stool to sit rather than stoop for several weeks after that, since my hip flexor muscles were still weak on the surgery side, but gardening wasn't a restricted activity. I got cautious approval from my doctor to start teaching my Pilates class again after that 2-week visit, if I did so coaching them from a chair. Officially (ahem) that's what I did, but I eased myself back into floor Pilates another week or two later, just skipping some of the exercises that really challenge the cut muscles. Movements that lift your leg outward, particularly if you add a turning action, are the ones that take the longest to come back and there are a few outer hip exercises that I wasn't back to my pre-surgery levels for a good 6 months (but normal people probably wouldn't have noticed that - most movements were fine).

    In your case, you might find that working on uneven ground might challenge the outer hip muscles so you might be more mindful about putting your good leg on the downward slope as you work for a while until you feel stable on your surgery leg. You seriously might think about some home Pilates exercises to target that muscle group to rebuild that strength in these outer hip muscles that get cut in an anterior approach, always remembering to listen to your body and not push it too fast.

    As for carrying heavy things, I'd say if the rest of your core is solid carrying isn't as much of a burden on your hip per se. It's how unstable it might make you walking that you'll have to watch. The only reason it might challenge your hip is in the lift process, if you put a lot of the weight into your glutes as you lift. The glutes are intact with an anterior approach, but you're liable to get some pain in the outer hip muscles that are weak in the first 4-6 weeks so maybe only lift half of what you'd normally lift till you get a feel for what works. The same goes for digging - start with lighter digging for the first couple of weeks after you're walking easily and gradually add back in more strenuous tasks. I had my surgery at the end of February and had no trouble digging my usual 300+ rose holes starting in early April through May (taking a break of course as needed). I should add though that my soil is pretty good and this didn't involve anything like a pickax.

    So realizing that your experience may differ from mine, here's a rough timeline of my recovery for a reasonably fit and healthy 50 year old who started PT before hip replacement:

    First couple of days - walk comfortably around my home and manage household tasks except some bending, walk longer distances with walker for security - steps were OK slowly with caution and good leg leading

    First week or two - walk comfortably several blocks without a walker, steps OK alternating legs with caution

    Two-four weeks after surgery - manage incision, normal walking activities are fine mostly, get gradually back into low impact aerobics, toning and gardening/digging with caution and not extensive bending.

    1-2 Months after surgery - cautiously doing normal gardening tasks, with a little more sitting and a little less heavy lifting than I'd normally do, everything else back to normal (incision healed enough to go swimming after about 6 weeks)

    2-6 months after surgery - get back to being able to push both legs in strenuous exercise to an equal extent. I could notice the replaced hip lagging behind the other in strength and flexibility for at least that long, but I was really checking detailed strength and mobility (be sure to check that yourself too - sometimes that's what limits your function more than strength). I was probably back to 85% of the other hip during this period, with the remaining 10% gain lasting through the first year back.

    Never - extended high impact exercise like jogging (gee darn...). Trotting across the road is fine but be aware that the only part of the artificial hip that's vulnerable to wear and tear is the coating over the titanium. Your titanium hip will likely last your remaining lifetime (as I understand it), but you can wear out the coating and need it replaced if you do hip-hop dancing or basketball or such things. Fortunately gardening is low impact as far as joints are concerned so that's not restricted at all.

    Nowadays my hip is back to probably 95% of the other one, with just a few tweaks here and there that are just going to be remaining quirks. Virtually all of my current gardening (and daily living) body woes are from the 3 herniated discs in my back, bone spurs all over my neck, and rheumatoid arthritis everywhere else. Welcome to growing older, eh? Those you just manage, and fortunately gardening is one of two best exercises that build and maintain healthy bones for those of us who are aging gracefully and avoiding osteoporosis. The other one BTW is weight lifting, and it sounds like you have some of that planned as well, in the form of garden soil.

    All in all, you will not be long-term restricted because of the hip replacement in your garden but you'll need to ease back into it and listen to your body. That's one reason I scheduled mine in winter so I would be able to give myself the down time I needed for a month or so without doing goofy things my body wasn't ready for yet.

    Hang in there, and hope this post wasn't too long to be helpful.
    Cynthia

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  • maryc_gwSoCA/USDA10

    Hey Cynthia - pleased as I am with my recovery i want yours next time! I wonder if it's the years of pilates beforehand. Thanks for your post - lots there for even those of us who have already done it.

    MaryC




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  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    That was a wonderful report, Cynthia!

  • boncrow66

    Cynthia you did a great job of explaining what to expect! You sound like you had a great recovery and I think that’s so smart of you to have therapy before surgery, I have never heard of that before but It makes sense if your able to do it.

    Bart and Lisa I know you both have underlying health issues that you both have mentioned before and I hope you both have good recoveries. A good positive attitude also goes along way and I wish you both the best of luck and a speedy uneventful recovery!

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  • Lisa Adams

    Yes, excellently detailed report, Cynthia! I’m feeling much better about the whole thing from reading everything here. Mary also wrote me a similar detailed experience. I’m just getting over the shock of hearing that I need a new hip, but all this has greatly put my mind at ease. Apparently, one of my biggest challenges will be in getting the insurance company to approve the procedure in a timely manor. My Dr. said that had I come in about my hip much sooner, it probably wouldn’t have helped me physically, but the insurance companies like to see a longer documented history of the problem. I’ll need to go through some “comfort” type procedures and Meds as a “first option”. The cortisone injection hasn’t helped me one bit. He says surgery is the only thing that will “fix” the problem, but insurance companies like to see non surgical options tried first. I guess I shouldn’t have waited so long to first mention it. By the time I finally came in about it, things were already very advanced. So much for “toughing it out”.

    Thanks very much for all the info. I’m sure Bart will be very reassured by these reports. Lisa

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  • boncrow66

    Lisa don’t beat yourself up over waiting to long, we are the same age and I would have done the same if my hip was hurting, I probably would have played it off as nothing. But your doctor is correct about the insurance company, they like to see that all conservative measures have been taken and if that fails then surgery is the next step. Good luck and I hope they approve it quickly. My mom had to have two steroid injections in her back at two different intervals before she could have her back surgery.

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  • KarenPA_6b

    Bart and Lisa, have you both looked into infrared K Laser treatment to ease hip pain? If this therapy works for your cases, you maybe able to avoid the surgery. But if you do decide on the surgery, please take a lot of vitamin C (preferably liposomal Vitamin C) to help your body ward off infection as well as with tissues healing. Good luck with whatever you decide.

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  • Melissa Northern Italy zone 8

    I'm reading this with a good deal of attention, as my hip has been bothering me for some time now, and, yes, the pain is spreading to the other joint. I'm trying to pay attention to my posture, and need to have a talk with my doctor. I'm just older than bart. Good luck to you, bart, and it sounds like a procedure that's going to improve your life. The reports from forum members are encouraging: thanks on my part for all this helpful information.

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  • bart_2015

    OMG, you people are wonderful! I plan to go back to this thread and read and re-read it to get a better grasp on things; right now I'm waiting to do my 5th round of chemotherapy, and this messes with my mind somewhat; it's hard to concentrate, so I want to come back and re-read when I'm "normal" again.

    Yes, I put it off too long. My husband is even a physical therapist,and a very good one, too, and I saw an orthopedic doctor,chosen carefully by said DH; ( you have to be very careful with orthopedic surgeons because the inferior ones will automatically say "operate! "; they suffer from the illusion that they can "fix" anything). Both -at first-advised me to put it off as long as possible; they were fooled by the fact that I still have very good flexibility in that leg, even though the hip is completely blocked. In November I got on the waiting list to have the operation done by these doctors in a town called Fucecchio,that are famous for being particularly good with hip replacements. But then this lung thing was discovered. The chemotherapy causes such extreme nausea for me that I have to take cortisone drops with the anti-nausea medicine,and that makes the hip worse. My DH talked to the hip doctor who was incredibly nice and said that in these cases they skip the waiting list, yet he still recommended that I wait until September to get the operation done; it will be cooler, and people will all be back from vacation (here in Italy things almost completely "shut down" for the month of August). September is not an ideal moment for me to be out of commission as a gardener,but in the circumstances I really can't be choosy, lol! But what Cynthia writes is very, very encouraging...

    Once again, thank you all so much. Lisa, I'm so pleased and happy that my own question was of help to you as well!

  • KarenPA_6b

    Bart, please consider water fasting for 5-7 days before doing your chemotherapy. THough it may sound counterintuitive, it has been found that water fasting and deprivation of food to the body trigger the body mechanisms for healing and survival. The chemo is more effective in killing cancer cells because cancer cells lack the evolutionary ability to change its genes into survival mode as normal cells do when the body is deprived of food. THe water fasting also helps in alleviating many symptoms of chemo. You can watch about this study and research as well as personal testimony from a Los Angeles judge who survived breast cancer from doing chemo in conjunction with water fasting. Here is Youtube link for this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1b08X-GvRs

    The bit about water fasting and cancer starts at 40:20 mark.

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  • boncrow66

    Bart it sounds like you are in good hands with your PT husband and you are getting excellent medical care from your oncologist, I’m sorry you are having to go through all of this, I’ll be saying prayers for your healing and recovery.

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  • Lisa Adams

    So much great information here! I was just thrilled when I saw Bart asking this question. (I’m not thrilled that you’re in this situation Bart, just thrilled that you asked.) These are just the very issues I had been wondering about. I honestly was so shocked when told upon my very first visit to the Dr. (a few weeks ago) complaining of hip pain, that my hip needed replacement, that I hardly absorbed what he was saying. I do remember him saying that this certainly hadn’t come up overnight, and I must have been hurting for years already. That’s true, but because I could still function through it, I ignored it, the way I do with many other aches and pains. A few weeks ago, seemingly out of the blue, I could hardly walk. So being told I had severe arthritis, severe narrowing of something (don’t even remember what), and multiple bone spurs, came as a complete surprise. I kept saying to the Dr. , when he called, “but I just turned 50! How can this be?” Genetics and multiple falls on the hip as a result of balance issues probably, was his answer.

    I’m intrigued by the Vitamin C recommendation, Karen. I already self administer an immune suppressing medicine (Copaxon), by injection thrice weekly for the MS. I wonder if that medicine will have an impact on recovery, or if I’ll be told to stop before surgery. The K laser treatments sound interesting, as well. As usual, what kind of treatment I get will depend upon what my insurance will pay for. All I know is that something must be done. I feel as though I’ve become an old woman almost overnight.

    Bart, you’re in my thoughts. I hope this round goes smoothly for you. I hope you’re ok with my joining your thread. Your timing couldn’t have been better for me. I feel like I’ve been watching my garden go to shambles since the hip thing became intolerable. Lisa

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  • K S

    Good luck Bart! We are all cheering for you and your new hip to be back in the garden in good time! This is probably going to echo what has been said above, but I'll offer it anyway. The people I have known who have gotten hip replacements have done best when they were willing to work through the discomfort and really do their rehab exercises as their physical therapist told them to. The ones who have a bad time are the ones who avoid their exercises. I'm sure you will rehab very well!

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  • KarenPA_6b

    Lisa, I am not sure if Vitamin C is suitable for your condition as Vitamin C is supposed to boost immunity. Since you take an immune suppressing drug, Vitamin C may not be appropriate for your condition. You have to consult with your doctor to see if its use is ok.

    I recently had a molar tooth extracted due to a bad root canal infection. I took Vitamin C (2000mg/day) the week before the extraction and in the week after the extraction, I found that it really helped with healing. It's two weeks now and no infection. The small swelling lasted 2 days. I remembered when I had my wisdom tooth extracted in my 20's (when I was very healthy), it took a week and an antibiotics prescription for the large swelling to subside and the area to heal. My body just cannot take antibiotics anymore as it is too hard on my gut. I try to take Vitamin C to prevent infection and thus avoid antibiotics.

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  • boncrow66

    Lisa also check with your doctors about taking Vitamin D. I know the doctor I work for always orders that for patients after surgery to help repair bones and help with healing.

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  • jerijen

    I've not had a hip, but I've had 2 knees done, and -- surprisingly -- I am told hips are easier. So, I would agree with 3-4 months -- and the immense value of good physical therapy.

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  • Plumeria Girl (Florida ,9b)

    Bart and Lisa good luck for the surgery. I been back and forth also. Not for myself but for my hubby who is going to meet a surgeon on Tuesday. We did went 2 weeks ago but they prefer latest MRI. So, Jeff had 1 done last week. He was so terrified about going under a knife but his pain is getting really severe. Jeff prolonged this for 12 years. He is home most of the time Bec of his soreness and pain. His meds are not working so now he have decided to do this surgery and go for it.

    I am hoping it will be done this year. I am also hoping he can do what he loves is traveling, fishing, white water rafting ( I don't think he can do that ) , hiking, cycling, swimming and best of being himself. I hate to leave him alone at home while I go places. I left him once for overseas trip for my nephew wedding and I have not seen my family for 30 years. So, everyone meet up and I miss so many family reunions and finally I went after being force by Jeff.

    Jin

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  • everdebz

    I skimmed and saw vitamin supplement. Good idea to really watch nutrition before for a while. It should help your body right away when it's assaulted, and works to heal....

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  • nippstress - zone 5 Nebraska

    Glad to be helpful, and given the response from others who have been through this, my situation might have been a best case scenario. Surprisingly hips are easier to recover from than knees, I guess because
    of the more complicated mechanics of knees. What takes weeks in the
    recovery process for a hip takes months for knees.

    With the other trials you've been facing Bart and Lisa, that undoubtedly adds to the length and ease of recovery. If your body is already stressed by chronic conditions, it takes longer to heal from just about anything. I'm glad that it sounds like you both have excellent resources and advice for the hip surgery, and that's a large part of the ease of recovery too. You may not be able to get out into the garden for a while, but you can
    still access GardenWeb and keep up with friends during recovery. Add some time to each of my estimates by all means to account for the other issues, and know that we're all thinking of you.

    Cynthia

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  • Melissa Northern Italy zone 8

    I'm wondering, quite a bit, if incorrect posture doesn't cause excessive wear on joints. Any ideas, folks? My shoulder and elbow, hip and knee joints are all more or less achy. A few years ago my shoulder got to the point that I couldn't lift my arm above my head: I was prescribed physical therapy, with mixed results; but the part of it that helped was all about correcting my posture. I worked away at posture, and now my shoulder is fairly functional. Still I slump, but if I flatten my back and stomach, throw my shoulders back and my chest out, it seems to help. It would be nice not to get to the point of needing joint replacement.

    My doctor recommends that I not take such long walks (she's awed that I walk the five miles from house to town, so not herself an athlete); I mean, eight to ten miles, sometimes more. Are long walks bad for you? The feeling of strength and freedom I get from being able to do this are important for me. Generally there's little scrambling involved: with my half-wrecked knees I just can't manage it.

    Bart, good luck!

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  • Lisa Adams

    I think posture could possibly play a role in some cases, Melissa. I slump forward myself, and I feel the effects of it. As someone mentioned, having a hip fixed sooner than later is often a good idea, before the other hip is damaged by your compensating for the bad one. That would be similar to posture, yes? You DO a lot of walking! Surely the good it does you outweighs any negatives? I think as long as you’re not jogging, thus putting high impact on your joints, walking is a good thing.

    I’ve always thought I’d need a knee replaced before long. Overall, that’s been hurting much longer. I’ve never mentioned it to the Dr. Now I’m wondering if I should, but I hate to start complaining about another thing.

    Jin, I hope Jeff’s surgery gives him some relief. I know he’s suffered terribly for many years.

    I actually already take 10,000 units of vitamin D daily, as per my neurologist. Even though I’m in the sun every day, I was found to be deficient, a common thing in MS patients, I’m told.

    Both knees, Jeri? That’s two big surgeries! I’ve heard knee replacement is a little rough to recover from. In fact, the two people that I know that had knees replaced, went to a “nursing home” type place for a bit between the hospital and home. That’s what I was expecting for hip surgery too, so I’m glad to hear that’s not the norm.

    Hang in there, Bart! I imagine you’re not feeling super great today, since you just had a round of chemo. I hope you’re about finished with them, and they do the job. We’re all thinking of you.... Lisa


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  • bart_2015

    No,no,Lisa; it had to be put off a week because of low blood values; I ought to be doing it this week if blood values are back up again. I feel very fuzzy and weak though, probably because of this anti-fungal medicine I've had to take this week,to combat the horrible taste that prevented me fron eating properly.

    For me, turning 50 was a big deal, but it really isn't "old" at all; all it means is that now you get to count your age by decades instead of years,lol! (example."I'm in my fifties" is now valid for the next ten years) No, but seriously,many people even in their forties need hip replacements. The example that springs to mind, other than rbehs' friend,is the companion of a collegue of my DH's; he ( the companion) had to get his hip replaced and he is only in his early forties.She (the collegue) was so worried about him that I think he did spend some of the recovery time in an institution, but it was by no means necessary; it was just to make Francesca feel better. He's fine now. And ,btw, having a hip blocked does cause pain in the knee area -the doctor who will hopefully operate on me said so. In any case, as my DH knows only too well from his vast experience with patients, once you get the hip done everything will feel a lot better. As I know from him (DH), Jeri is absolutely right about knees being much, much more difficult and problematic than hips,so my adviceis don't start worrying about them now; get the hip done and then see how the knees feel.

    Melissa, I do know from my DH that posture is extremely important in maintaining everything ; he scolds me every time he sees me slump (though with the hip I can't stand straight, so he'll have to wait to yell at me for that,lol). I doubt he'd think that long walks could hurt you; quite the contrary! Sadly, aches and pains are sort of a part of ageing. But good posture definitely helps.

  • KarenPA_6b

    Lisa, I too am deficient in Vitamin D. I take it with Vitamin K2. I would recommend that you check with your doctor if Vitamin K2 is appropriate for your condition. Please research into the necessity of taking high dose of Vitamin D with Vitamin K2.

    Sometimes I wonder how many people 50+ are deficient in Vitamin D? There is something going on in our body that cannot produce Vitamin D from sunlight. I believe that if people get the vitamin D level checked along with their regular bloodwork, they would be very surprised to find that most of them are deficient.

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  • boncrow66

    I’m over 50 and also deficient in Vitamin D, I actually discovered that I was in my 40’s so I take supplements but the only explanation I was given was that it’s part of getting older. (Huge eye roll from me).

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  • KarenPA_6b

    That's what my family doctor told me too. I wonder if people age 50+ in other countries suffer the same condition of vitamin D deficiency? I particularly am interested if the people from Europe, Russia, China, or other regions in the northern hemisphere get this same problem as part of their aging.

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