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roselee_gw

Spring has sprung ...

While I was worrying about weeds I almost forgot to notice that spring has sprung ...


Jill is wondering if it's a bee ...


... that's making the columbines dance. Or is it the joy of being ... here ... now ...


How could I not notice the expression of coral honeysuckle? It's all joy ...


What are you noticing in your garden?

Photos welcomed ...

Comments (69)

  • Vulture61

    Hi, Cameron!


    Looking good man. I think you forgot to post the picture of your Carolina jessamine.


    Omar



  • blackwillow87

    Hi Omar! Thanks! I got the Carolina Jessamine from a raffle a few years ago. It's supposed to be more cold tolerant than the original one.

  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Thank you all for the wonderful photos above! Keep them coming. Here's a few more from me ...

    Yellow columbine flower which is about twice the size of the individual columbine flowers I posted above ...

    ...

    Claret cup cactus ...

    ...

    Some of you may remember my goal to make the garden easier at this stage of my gardening 'career'. As part of that plan the fake waterfall fountain was planted with Dyckia 'silver sheen' (I think) and some small cactus. Both will persist with little soil or water ...

    ...

    Also part of the plan was to have colorful pots in case flowers were not providing enough color to suit my 'colorful' tastes ... ;-)



  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    I miss my claret cup cactus. I had a beauty that the fire ants killed while I was on vacation. I have these small diminutive Purple phacelia flowers that do not appear every spring. They always make me jump for joy since they are so once in a while kind of flower. I keep that spot weeds out to make room for them every year.



    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • blackwillow87

    Roselee I really like the fake waterfall display with the dyckias.

    Wantonamara I really like the purple Phacelia too.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • blackwillow87

    I almost missed this little guy, Ten Petal Anemone.


    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • Vulture61

    I like the wild anemone too. They show up like crazy in my lawn in white, pink and purple. They disappear in summer but come back the following year.


    Omar

  • blackwillow87

    Wow I've never seen the purple ones before. I usually see the white and sometimes pink.

  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    You might not have strong enough sun to turn them purple. The sun makes therm turn and that is how they grow in the middle of a field where they get FULL FULL FULL sun. They come up white and age into darker colors.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    Here to. They and Frilly Puccoon are the harbingers of spring. The anemones were real abundant and healthy this year.

  • blackwillow87

    I didn't knownknow the sun turned them purple, I learned something new. I have mine in the shade garden so maybe I'll move it? I had to look up Frilly Puccoon. I've never heard of it until now.

  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    The decent sized Spanish bluebell bulbs planted last fall came up robust as expected, but haven't bloomed (yet?). Plants from much smaller bulbs planted earlier do bloom with a single flower, but have changed little and remain very wimpy even after a few years of growth and feeding... am starting to wonder if they may be something other than Hyacinthoides hispanica:


    The late hard freeze killed all the Dutch iris blooms and left only a few of the bearded:


    Snowflakes (Leucojum aestivum) are still blooming:


    'Bonfire' dwarf peach flowers nicely, but don't believe it has set fruit since we removed the 'Bonanza' a couple years ago. Though am still finding seedlings from the pits squirrels planted around the yard over the years:


    The Chinese fringe flower ( Loropetalum chinense ) is putting on its best show in years... almost makes me wonder if it can sense I'm about to remove it. Its broad layered form was split in half by an ice storm several years ago and it managed to recover into a fairly nice vertical vase shape. Unfortunately the chlorosis has recently gotten progressively worse, which a local plant expert says happens here where their roots can reach the limestone as they mature:


    The long floppy branches of the young agarita are covered in blooms:


    Flocks of cedar waxwings have stripped the bumper crop of red burford holly berries during a couple weeks of foraging in the neighborhood. But didn't have much interest in the blueish ones on the leatherleaf mahonia:


    Our dogwood is in the heavy shade of a neighbor's live oak and is quite a bit slower to "flower" than another around the block that gets much more light. The bracts are just now shaking off their green tinge:


    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)
  • Irving Ragweed (Austin 8b)

    Wonderful pics, bostedo. Such a substantial difference between DFW and Austin. My agaritas stopped blooming about three weeks ago, and yours is at its peak. The fun doesn't stop there. Little fruits are already growing. Birds and other critters are crazy about them.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked Irving Ragweed (Austin 8b)
  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex



    above is my Bilbergia windii and Hinkley's Columbine.. And my Agave and bluebonnets are still at it

    The fragrant mimosa is LATE due to the freeze most likely.




    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Spring has sprung the box turtles out of their hibernation. Their shells are still muddy. The two males are very interested in Big Mama. I wonder why ...

    When we're talking about 'the birds and the bees' lets not forget the turtles!

    Life springs forth abundantly in spring in so many ways!

    Big Mama will be digging her shallow nest in a sunny spot soon and laying 3 to 5 eggs.

    Cheers!

  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    Irving Ragweed, Yes, our 'Major Wheeler' is just now approaching the look of the coral honeysuckle in the OP photo from around the 16th. Though our columbines aren't even showing any buds yet. So, agree Dallas does seem to lag central Texas by 2 to 4 weeks depending on the microclimates. Have been enjoying all the "previews" from SA and Austin.


    Believe this is the third season for the agarita from a one gallon start. Had been looking, but don't recall seeing any fruit after it bloomed similarly last year. Was wondering if it's been too young to set fruit or the squirrels/birds are just much quicker than I realized.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)
  • southofsa

    Turtle porn over my morning coffee!! Made me laugh :-)

    Thanks Ragna-

    Lisa

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked southofsa
  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    Ragna, shame on you. LOL

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Oh well, that's life in the big city! ;-D

    Yesterday I pruned and repotted this bougainvillea to see if I could grow it as a bonsai ... (sort of)

    Patty gave me the idea when she said, "Your bougies are so old they look like bonsas."

    If you want a short stature, long blooming Texas native for full sun it's hard to beat Blackfoot daisies as well as Four nerve daisies. Both gently seed themselves around. This BFD has been in this spot for 3 years or more ...

    ,,,

    Wine cups and Four nerve daisies in front yard ...

    ...


    For all of you animal lovers out there Jill sends puppy kisses while Alfie looks as if to say "I don't know you!" ... :-)

    Happy gardening!

  • Irving Ragweed (Austin 8b)

    bostedo: For a while I had only one agarita. It set fruit about every other season, which suggested the nearest agarita was beyond reliable pollinator range. Fruiting has been consistent since I added a second one.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked Irving Ragweed (Austin 8b)
  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    Irving R.: My understanding is the flowers on agarita are perfect, so am expecting some berries at maturity assuming the pollinators (or wind?) show up. Why an additional plant near by can increase fruit production on a self-fertile plant is just magic to me; though have also experienced this with self-fertile peach and pear varieties.

  • annieinaustin

    This entire thread is so beautiful I've been rolling up, down, up, down again, thank you all!

    About those Spanish scilla, bostedo - they look like a bulb I used to grow in Illinois - Siberian squill/scilla. Up there the bulbs gradually spread into wide patches of deep blue. Scilla siberica from MOBOT

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked annieinaustin
  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    Thanks, annieinaustin! Think you are probably right that I was sold a bag of Siberian squill (Scilla siberica) tagged as Spanish bluebells (Hyacinthoides hispanica). Also explains why they (squill) bloom so much earlier than the bluebells acquired from a different source (bluebells bloom about a month later than the true squills). The bluebell flowers are just now opening - I'll add a photo once they look better.

    Siberian squill seems to have some reputation for becoming invasive up north. Though here, they look more like they're just getting by (not thriving) - I question whether they can seed out as elsewhere in our north Texas heat and clay. Two of the twelve in this planting died out early, but there are a few offsets in this third year on some of the survivors.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)
  • annieinaustin

    Hi bostedo! It took 10 years for a few dozen bulbs of Siberian squill to make a small patch in IL so they sure weren't invasive in my garden... but the soil was also clay up there. Bet they are different where it is sandy.

    My Spanish bluebells are planted near yellow columbines and I love those two colors together... they were opening last week. I've read that Hyacinthoides hispanica is invasive in Austin but I planted them here in 2009 and they've barely increased.
    They're planted near yellow columbines and I love the color combination - here they are opening together last week. [this was for the Sunday Flower Report on Twitter]

    Annie



    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked annieinaustin
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas


    Succulents are showing off like Texas native Sedum nuttallianum

    ...

    It does well draping from a plant stand where it's grown for several years. Not sure why Lady Bird Johnson Wildflowers site lists it as an annual ...

    ...

    Mizan found Echinopsis chamaecereus at a garage sale and passed along a start. It has about a dozen buds. Listed as a zone 10 plant it's been perfectly hardy uncovered in a pot for two years.

    Alfie is inspecting a little toad that I just emptied out of his water bowl ..

    ...

    Speaking of 'showing off' decided to try and show off my 'pet' hippos by setting them on a mound of fossils, some genuine, some fake ...

    ...

    All the dyckias are blooming. This is D. Burgundy ice ...

    ...

    I'm loving all your photos!

  • blackwillow87

    I have two native columbines that are blooming. One is canadensis and I'm not sure what the yellow one is?






    Clarence bearded iris


    Blue-eyed grass


    Cross Vine


    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Oh, they are all so pretty! I'm happy to see the Cross Vine close up. Mine are blooming at the very top of the pecan tree.

    The native yellow columbine may be Hinkley's.

  • blackwillow87

    Thanks Roselee! I have another Cross Vine called 'Tangerine Beauty' that's about to bloom as well. The cross vine in the photo has been very aggressive and it's growing between the siding on the house lol.


    My columbine definitely looks like the Hinkley's one. Thanks Roseless for identifying it.


  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    My husband does not let me grow vines on the house for that reason. Sigh.

  • blackwillow87

    Wantonamara you should have seen the wisteria I had years ago. I made the stupid mistake of planting it by the house and it started growing through the siding and through the window. I'm still battling it, since it refuses to die lol.

  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    I can believe it. My Niece planted 5 around a small porch and I told her she didn't want to do that. They didn't listen. What a mess.

    Here is some more flowers

    MyOne pink primrose. Maybe more will follow.





  • blackwillow87

    I couldn't imagine dealing with 5, that's a nightmare!I really like the Texas Betony, mine sort of died back some but it's recovering nicely. What are the red flowers in the last photo, they look familiar.

  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    Freesia laxa or false freesia. I don't know what is false about them. They grow well in dry part shade. I should try some in more sun. The Tx betony grows really easily from cuttings. Just stick it in soil . now magic powders no plastic moisture retainer. Just go for broke.

  • blackwillow87

    I tried to start some Freesia laxa seeds for my winter sowing project. I didn't know the betony could root so easily from cuttings.

    I found a bloom on one of my Byzantine gladiolus.


    Role Model bearded iris


    Lyre leaf sage

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Blackwillow, what an array of lovely plants!

    Couldn't resist giving a quick update on Echinopsis chamaecereus to show its floriferousness. It's worth coining a new word for! ... lol It has dozens and dozens of buds and more forming every day ...

    The 'thorns' are soft. It can be handled with out fear of sticking ...

  • blackwillow87

    Thanks Roselee! Your Echinopsis is stunning! The red flowers really pop out.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    Here are the early blooms on the real Spanish bluebells mentioned earlier:


    Were highly recommended for DFW shade by FWBG staff, so the significantly smaller stature and single bloom of the mislabeled Siberian squill had been disappointing.... not so bad now that I know its real identity. Have been trying early bulbs that will work in the shady spaces of deciduous plants like woodfern and beautyberry. Too soon to tell if these will die back enough before the ferns return.... but otherwise are looking good in the perpetual shadows of oaks.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)
  • blackwillow87

    My Spanish Bluebells look so much smaller than yours bostedo. They were small bulbs last year, so maybe that's why the leaves are smaller?

  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    Blackwillow, These were large (8-10cm circumference) Dutch-grown bulbs planted last fall and look just as I'd been expecting. If your plants look right, but just smaller versions, then probably are just younger bulbs. Otherwise, the Siberian squill I planted 3 years ago thinking they were Spanish bluebells were much smaller bulbs (7-8cm?) and have a different look producing much smaller/fewer leaves and flowers - any chance your source may also have had a mix-up?

  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    I just love that time of spring when the whole world turns yellow due to the grass and the light shining through the new oak leaves. The air turns yellow with new life. you can breathe in the golden light.

    This view will turn colorful in a bit with blooms.


    .

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Mara, I know what you mean. I love it too, and I love how you almost captured it in your photos, but I suppose we have to experience it for ourselves to truly appreciate that new spring light.


  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    It is such a fugitive time. The best yellow light day has past a couple of days ago . We are past that apex. I would have to drive north to catch it somewhere north of Waco. We are into soft grass period which is so appreciated by Texans since the grass will gray out, but up as the summer goes. Our Emerald period is fugitive too. Not like up north who have soft bright green grass all summer.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    And some of us thought that yellow light was live oak pollen! ... :-)

  • blackwillow87

    bostedo I got them from a gardener here in the DFW area. When she had posted pictures of her garden I think I saw a picture with the caption Spanish Bluebells. I'm hoping they're just small bulbs? I think when I planted them last year they were about the size of a dime or a little smaller.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    Some of that 'yellow light' is in THIS one minute video from PBS Nature.

    There will be a three-day LIVE event about spring on April 29, 30 and May 1 on PBS and Facebook. One minute trailer: American Spring Live.

  • bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)

    Seems much of our 'yellow light' is being reflected from the pollen coating left on most everything during the incredible rain of catkins from the oaks and pistaches this season. Almost like having to shovel snow from the walks and drive every 4 or 5 days.... well, with a leaf blower :-)

    Golden groundsel (Packera obovata) is going to seed, but is still the main yellow in the garden at the moment. After trying many options, it's become my favorite evergreen native ground cover for heavy shade. I usually deadhead before the seeds can disperse, so don't know how aggressively they would volunteer if left to blow away.


    Of course, four-nerve daisy is back strong after a short rest in late winter:


    'John Clayton' honeysuckle remains sparse but is still healthy and blooming in heavy shade:


    Am looking forward to seeing the yellow flowers on Jerusalem sage (Phlomis sp) which has finally set buds for the first time after being protected from our late hard freeze. The prior two years it remained evergreen until the last freezes killed it to the ground. Am guessing it does not flower in the years it dies back, which makes it an unreliable bloomer in unsheltered sites in north Texas.... maybe why it's not seen more here:


    Not yellow, but an odd 7-petal flower on the Jackmanii clematis. Flowers on this vine usually have only 4-petals and occasionally 5. This many is a first for us:


    Blackwillow, Imagine your Spanish bluebells are just offset babies. Steve Huddleston's book for north central Texas recommends a time-release fertilizer in early spring... using less if you're also applying organics.

    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked bostedo (8a tx-dfw-blackland prairie)
  • blackwillow87

    Bostedo, I need to get some time-release fertilizer. That should definitely help them. The golden groundsel you gave me a couple of years ago is doing great and it's multiplied nicely. I see it's covered in seed heads. I know it's not an outdoor plant but one of my Denbrobium orchids is blooming again.


    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • blackwillow87

    St. Joseph's Lily


    A couple of flower clusters on my coral honeysuckle


    Cedar Sage



    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked blackwillow87
  • wantonamara Z8 CenTex

    It seems to be a good morning for oranges. I even caught a hummer on a kniphofia . It has taken years for these to hit their stride. Soil not rich enough site not sunny enough, drought and more. The small tornado took out a cedar and I removed a large evergreen sumac. and now they bloom. The cross vine FINALLY bloomed. Usually it blooms before the oaks leaf out. Some flowers are really out of wack daminitia are still lagging and they are early bloomers.






    roselee z8b S.W. Texas thanked wantonamara Z8 CenTex
  • roselee z8b S.W. Texas

    I just scrolled through all the beautiful photos above again. Isn't this a wonderful spring?

    Some very small solitary wasps have moved into the bee house. As you can see many cells are filled. Anyone know what kind they are? How could I find out?

    ...

    On to the garden; nothing quite surpasses the serenity of morning light ...

    ...

    The 'bonsai bougie' is coming alive with flowers before leaves ...

    ...

    This little red flowered cactus just keeps going and going and going with fresh flowers every couple of days and is not near done yet. The one next in line is showing its second and last big pink flower ...

    ...

    The light was shining through these pieces so prettily I took a photo. They are are on the green house shelf awaiting just the right placement ...

    ...

    Wish I had a before picture. I refinished this old pot to highlight the design and planted it with a card board palm. Looks much better ...

    ...

    Remember those lamps from way back that circulated drops of oil on little fish lines to resemble rain drops? I've had an old rusty one for years before deciding to do something with it. Whatcha' think? ...

    ...

    For some unknown reason the white veined pipevine that seeded itself in the gravel under the table is doing great! Come on Pipevine swallowtails ...

    ...

    If the Fanick's phlox insists on growing only on one side of the pot then the cat rock that Mizan gave me will be happy to curl up in the space ...

    ...

    Cleaned out the green house yesterday and am about done with any more projects, pot painting or otherwise. How about you? I know Mara's working hard on a biggie -- the building of her home. Time for an update Mara.

    What projects are you working on?


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