lynn_nevins

Rosa Setigera (climbing prairie rose)

Lynn Nevins
last year
last modified: last year

Hi all.

So I've been gardening for about 15 years now...mainly as a container gardener, and a bit of gardening done in a 'real yard with dirt'. But most of my experience is with containers.

While I know containers have their own unique needs (more frequent watering, and extra protection for the plant/roots during the colder months), aside from that, I'd always been of the understanding that most anything that can grow in a traditional dirt yard can also be grown in a container. But that you may need to do a bit of pruning now and then...of the visible plant...of the root ball...and providing extra soil ammendments...potting-up as needed....so that the plant is happy in its container.

And indeed, I've successfully grown a number of perennials in pots...blueberry shrubs... hydrangea... Japanese maple, etc.

This past fall I bought a bareroot Rosa Setigera. Come this past Spring, I noticed that while other gardeners in the area (with DIRT yards) ...I noticed that all their rose bushes were in full bloom, my Rosa Setigera barely had any leaf growth, never mind flower buds or flowers. The response I received about this was for the most part that 'this is NOT a plant that can grow in a pot'. (I took that comment to imply that THAT was why I was not seeing any new growth...that my putting it in a pot had already ruined any chances for survival/new growth...) However, a few other people explained to me that this type of rose blooms later in the year than traditional rose shrubs, and that maybe I just needed to wait a bit more. That said however, they also told me it may take a few years for me to see actual FLOWERING.

Sure enough, about a month or two after other traditional rose shrubs around me had flowered, my Rosa Setigera suddenly TOOK OFF like a plant in the tropics. While the plant is in a large pot (maybe 18" in diameter, and 16" high) and has a trellis to support the bulk of the growth.... the plant is already starting to 'take over the pot'.

Perhaps THIS is really what folks were getting at previously when they said this plant is NOT intended for pots.....not so much that this plant would never be off to a good start in a pot, but that.... it is way too prolific a grower to be able to be contained or happy in a pot, for very long?

I'd really hate to 'give up' and admit defeat on this plant but.... does anyone know if there are any 'tricks' to my having this thrive in a large planter? ...say if I were to constantly cut back the growth and/or the root ball? Or would that just be an endless battle/chore?

I'd hate for the plant to die and all, because it's so rapidly outgrowing the pot. (I'm also now seeing evidence of what appears to be 'mildew' on some of the leaves... see photos....). Should I just give up on it now, and gift the plant to someone with a real DIRT yard, and while the plant still has a chance to survive?

Thanks!

Comments (10)

  • Lynn Nevins
    Original Author
    last year

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    last year

    Here is a setigera rose "Long John Silver". Your plant needs to be in the ground.


  • User
    last year

    Totally agree with Sheila.

  • Lynn Nevins
    Original Author
    last year

    OK, thanks all. I'm in the process of finding a new home for it. Question: once this plant is in the ground, is it a pretty self-sufficient plant? In other words, should it do ok even for a non-gardener...and so long as the person waters the plant, along with the rest of their yard, on a daily basis in the summer? Or could mildew etc and lack of attention to it, kill the plant? I'm trying to find a 'gardener' type person to take it but not sure I'll be able to find such a person. I may have to give it to a person with little to no gardening experience....

  • mad_gallica
    last year

    R. setigera is a native plant across at least half the US. It doesn't need, or particular want, watering fertilizing, or any other pampering. It does tip root, and can cover a great deal of ground.

  • Lynn Nevins
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Great. Thank you!


    One other Q.... as you can possibly see in the photos, I naively thought a trellis in the center of the pot would help/suffice(?!). At this point, I'm guessing it's probably unlikely that I'll be able to weave the growth in and out of the trellis in order to retain the trellis for myself, before giving the plant to someone else.


    And I think I"d also heard this plant shouldn't be cut back.


    So I guess the person will have to take the plant and bury it into the ground, trellis and all...

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I do think it would best be planted and left alone except for watering. It blooms on old wood, so pruning is not helpful and would spoil it's shape.

  • Vaporvac Z6-OhioRiverValley
    last year

    It doesn't look so large that you wouldn't be able to remove if careful. Give it a try! It looks like a nice trellis.

  • Lynn Nevins
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year





    Hi everyone I'm posting some more recent photos of the plant where you can see that the leaves not only were showing downy mildew but now they're turning yellowish Brown. My plan is to dig up this plant this weekend and take it on public transportation to my brother who has a large yard and a good spot for this. But before I make all this effort, does this plant look like it's maybe in too bad of condition and that it may not be salvageable? I've never had a plant with leaf problems like this so it's not clear to me if it will be salvageable. Thank you