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climbing rose help....did I ruin my rose?

Lucy
August 26, 2019
last modified: August 26, 2019

I just planted a New Dawn climbing rose that had a few blooms on the very end of the main canes. After the blooms fell off, I went down to the first five leaves and snipped off the buds to clean it up.

However now I’m afraid I made a huge mistake and I stunted those main canes for good.

Do I cut those back and wait for new canes to take their place? How do yo clean up a new rose bush where blooms are only on the ends still?

thank you






P.s. here is what I mean from blooms on the end, after I realized I may have made a mistake I left the buds on.

Comments (20)

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

    relax ... crikey.. you just planted it days ago ... it looks fine..


    roses have dormant buds... where the group of 5 leaves attack to the main stem .... if you look really close ... or in a week or two.. you will see new triggered buds growing ...


    but do keep in mind.. for most of us.... we are going into fall .. and things will slow down for winter ... but even here in MI.. you probably have enough time for one more bloom.. if ma nature cooperates ...


    where are you ...


    in my MI ... its basically too late to be fert'g... so put that out of your mind.. the further south you are.. the longer the season ...


    on any otherwise healthy plant.. of just about any kind .... pruning is not going to kill it ...


    bottom line.. relax.. and just try not to love it to death ...


    ken


    ps: its hard to tell from the pix... but a good layer of mulch.. around the plant sure wont hurt ...

    Lucy thanked ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
  • joeywyomingz4b

    I am probably all kinds of wrong but when I dead head I just nip off the spent bloom right at the base of the flower, not to the five leaves. Regrowth is great on all of them. I have a baby climber that I did this with and the canes kept growing longer past the stem of the flower. Following your thread if you don't mind so I can learn what everyone else likes to do.

    Lucy thanked joeywyomingz4b
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  • floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

    You've cut well above a bud/leaf axil in several of those pictures. You need to cut back to a bud. The stubs you've left will brown and die off. You can dead head as far back as you like as long as you go to a bud.

    Just one more point. New Dawn is large and horrendously prickly. It looks as if you've planted yours near a step or patio. I'd seriously rethink that position if it is anywhere near where people might pass. It'll tear them to shreds.

    Lucy thanked floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
  • seil zone 6b MI

    There are no laws about pruning. You did just fine. You can prune right at the base of the hip, just below where the cluster branches out or down to a five leaf set. It doesn't matter. The rose will grow from where IT wants to!


    New Dawn is a growth monster. You couldn't hurt it if you tried by pruning it. What you do want to do is get it trained to a trellis. The more horizontal you can fan the branches out the more bloom you will get. And that way you can also keep it away from any walkways.


    I'm in MI too and I wouldn't recommend any slow release fertilizer now but you can add organics to the soil at any time. Anything that enriches the soil is good for the roses. I also use a fish emulsion foliar feed sometimes in the fall. Around here you never know if first frost is going to be the beginning of October or the beginning of December. The roses will continue to grow until the weather stops them. This stuff about stopping dead heading and any kind of fertilizer to make them go dormant is an old wives tale. They will continue to grow as long as there is enough sunlight and the tamps are above freezing. They need to store energy in the canes to come back with next spring. So I want them to go into winter well fed. If you don't give them something they will use what energy they have to grow in the fall right up until freeze and deplete their resources. I do not recommend ANY fall hard pruning, wait for spring. In the spring when they show signs of growth you can start doing your pruning.

    Lucy thanked seil zone 6b MI
  • Embothrium

    The Bottom Line

    • Tree and shrub species differ dramatically in their ability to absorb foliar fertilizers. • Proper plant selection relative to soil type is crucial to appropriate mineral nutrition. • Foliar spraying is best accomplished on overcast, cool days to reduce leaf burn. • In landscape plants, foliar spraying can test for nutrient deficiencies, but not solve them. • Micronutrients are the only minerals that are effectively applied through foliar application. • Foliar application will not alleviate mineral deficiencies in roots or subsequent crown growth. • Foliar spraying is only a temporary solution to the larger problem of soil nutrient availability. • Minerals (especially micronutrients) applied in amounts that exceed a plant’s needs can injure or kill the plant and contribute to environmental pollution. • Any benefit from foliar spraying of landscape trees and shrubs is minor considering the cost and labor required.

    https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/foliar-feeding.pdf

    Lucy thanked Embothrium
  • seil zone 6b MI

    Yes, a temporary solution. Which is exactly what I want in September before the snow flies. I'm only trying to tide them over so they don't deplete themselves of nutrients before they go dormant. I don't want a full blown granular slow release fertilizer that will cause a huge spurt of new growth that has no chance of surviving the winter. I can't keep then from continuing to grow as long as the weather permits but I can support them until they go to sleep.

    Lucy thanked seil zone 6b MI
  • floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

    No, no laws. But there are good practices and one of them is not leaving stubs which will die back and disfigure the subject.

  • nanadollZ7 SWIdaho

    I agree with all that Seil said. Having grown several New Dawn Roses, I can tell you that it takes more than a little pruning to wipe that monster out. New Dawn is a large aggressive grower that even shrugged off a gopher attack in my garden. Don't plant this rose near walkways and doorways. Diane

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5

    btw .. once you observe how the new buds evolve.. in the next few weeks ...


    try to understand you can influence how the rose grows.. by how you stimulate the bud selection ... you prune back to a bud.. which is facing [will grow in ] the direction you want the plant to grow ..


    in other words.. e.g. ..... you might want a bud facing away from the porch ... rather than one that will grow into the porch ....


    this is where pruning becomes an art ... it will all come to you.. in the future ...


    ken

    Lucy thanked ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
  • P M

    You have not harmed your rose. You should always cut back to a leaf bud (albeit much closer than you have done), even when the bush is dormant. But your concern this late in the growing season should not be for the above-ground part of the bush, but for the roots. You want the plant to develop a good root structure before going dormant. I’ve always used root (B1) solutions, but I understand that idea is now considered a myth. I would top-dress the plant with a good composted manure, and drench the roots in a half-strength liquid kelp solution. Then keep the soil evenly moist and well mulched and — for the sake of root development — remove any new flower buds that may appear. In the spring your plant will be off to a good start.

    My New Dawn Rose is as big as the side of my house. It grew right up to the roof. It’s massive. I lop it back to about half height when it drops it’s leaves, then again after the first bloom cycle is finished. Then I occasionally cut back the long, searching canes it throws out. You do not need to coddle New Dawn.

    BTW, New Dawn has a huge following, but I prefer the Cecile Brunner rose. I think it’s a cleaner flower and plant.

    Leaving spent buds on a rose helps it to know when to go dormant (NOT a myth, as someone above claims). I would leave the existing hips on the plant. Next year, in late summer, you should start leaving some of the rose hips to develop, as long as there is no disease evident.

    Rose culture is pretty basic, but end-of-season care varies a bit with your climate. Do you get a hard freeze, or are you in a temperate region? Where I live winter is about 50 or more inches of rain, with some short periods of sub-freezing weather. We rarely get a hard freeze. My main concern in preparing roses for winter is shortening the canes so they don’t break in the wind or collapse in the rain, and cleaning up around the plants (and mulching) to fight funguses.

  • Keith Kale

    From a fellow Northerner -


    I live in Minnesota (not that much colder than MI) in Zone 4. I stop fertilizing in September and stop most pruning to prepare for the winter - getting roses to survive it is my biggest problem,


    I have to shield some of my roses from the cold, and more importantly, from the critters (bunnies and chipmunks). I pile mulch and leaves as high as I can and fence it with chicken wire. For some reason the bunnies eat my floribundas and leave my climber, Wm Baffin, alone. The chipmunks burrow around the roots of the roses and expose them to cold. All the roses die back and I prune the dead branches in the spring.


    Good luck!

  • nanadollZ7 SWIdaho

    I don't think you need to remove any new flower buds in the spring. It has no effect on root development. On this vigorous rose, you will have plenty of roots. Diane

  • P M

    @nanadoll...I did not say remove them in the spring. I said now. At the end of summer and into fall. So they have time and energy to get established before going dormant. Do you see the period after the word “appear” in my comment? And yes, it does aid in root development if you cut back a newly planted-out plant. That is why it’s advised that you cut back bare root trees when you plant them out (in the spring), and cut the flowers off of six-pack annuals when you put them in the garden (even better yet...plant them out before they set buds). when you plant bare root roses in the spring you need to cut the canes back, just like with fruit trees.

  • nanadollZ7 SWIdaho

    Gee, I've never cut back a bare root rose canes when I plant them. No wonder my roses are such puny little runts. Diane

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR

    Many experts don't cut the buds off. Tea roses never want pruning at all. Keith, why do you have 10 where zone usually is if you are in Minnesota?

  • P M

    @nanadoll, I believe that the cutting back of bare root trees or rose bushes kind of wakes up the dormant plant and allows it to focus its energy on root development rather than making leaves. Maybe it generates growth hormones? I’ve been told to cut back bare root trees by as much as a third, but I do less than that (I planted out more than twenty fruit trees a couple years ago, and all are thriving).


    The general advice for planting out bare root roses is to cut canes back by a third. Some of the rose plant stock I’ve purchased online has arrived with such skimpy canes that there isn‘t enough there to cut back that much. So I cut back to healthy, plump leaf buds. For my established rose plants, I concentrate on cutting out diseased and crossed canes in the spring. That often ends up removing about a third of the plant, but not always.

  • Keith Kale

    Sheila, moving to zone 10 and trying to get smart about it.

  • seil zone 6b MI

    I have never heard of cutting back a bare root rose at planting unless there is some dead cane to be removed. Pruning of any kind always stimulates TOP growth, not the roots. You can leave all the hips on you want. The rose will not go dormant. It will continue to put out growth until the weather stops it. I've left hips on from the spring flush in June and the rose continued to grow and bloom right through until October.


    New Dawn is such a growth monster that I can't see any purpose in disbudding it. The roots are growing, count on it! Roses, climbers in particular, will not send up more cane than their root system can sustain. Hence the saying for climbers, first year sleep, second year creep, third year leap. Those first few years that it seems to not be doing anything it is in fact building a big enough root ball to be able to push nutrients up those long canes you're waiting for. Once it feels it has sufficient roots to do that it will begin to climb.

  • P M

    @seil done, etc, you are looking for a fight for some reason. Over roses. I’m out of here.

  • seil zone 6b MI

    Not looking for a fight. Just stating my opinions based on my experiences.

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