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mickmurphed

Help with Angled Shower Door

M M
last year

We redid our master bathroom and before we began, we asked a frameless shower door installer to take a look at the job and give us an estimate. We explained our plans to knock out one wall and take out the existing shower door to create more space. He said he couldn’t give us a price until we did the demo, so we did the demo, then asked him to return. He then said he didn’t want to look at it yet but would look after all the tile was in, so we got the tile in, then asked him to come look. He is now telling us it will be absolutely impossible to install a frameless glass shower door at the angle of the new wall. We were flabbergasted as we had asked him every step of the way what we would need to do and he acted like he would figure it out at the end. What’s done is done, we now have a beautiful shower that he said he cannot work with. Are there any creative solutions for enclosing this shower? Or do we need to accept that we cannot put a door on this?

Comments (37)

  • millworkman
    last year

    I get his not coming out to the home especially during the pandemic. He could give you a price for a basic door just from a rough measurement. Why is the wall angled? It should be plumb and square for sure? Did you tell him the wall would be like this? No one in their right mind would build a shower wall angled like that on purpose from my thoughts so how would he expect that?

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  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Millworkman, it had nothing to do with the pandemic and everything to do with him not wanting to come out. If you don’t want to go to work in my opinion then there are plenty of other options like Zoom to get the job done. The answer isn’t to say, “just finish it and then I’ll come” and then come and say it’s unworkable. He knew we were doing the job and had every opportunity to give details of his needs for installation. I’m not sure that you’re offering any solutions so considering the stress we are under and the heartbreak, you might move on.

  • millworkman
    last year
    last modified: last year

    "I’m not sure that you’re offering any solutions so considering the stress we are under and the heartbreak, you might move on."


    I am truly sorry to hear about the stress and the heartache. But you cannot take and a hang any type of door in an opening that is that far out of square. You do not need an installer to tell you that much. As far as his not wanting to come to the home then why did you not find another installer?

  • millworkman
    last year

    Wait, what is he giving you a hard time about?

  • jewelisfabulous
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Kayozzy's solution would work, but your door into and out of the shower looks to be roughly 18" wide, so that's going to forever be too narrow and awkward. Your best bet is to bite the bullet and square up the entry (rebuild/extend the wall, shower floor, and curb) so you can have a somewhat normal width shower door.

  • kayozzy
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Hmmm, I thought he meant the angle where the wall meets the curb as most of them are perpendicular to the curb. But I bet Millworkman is right! I thought that was a trick of the photo angle, but with that visual, seems pretty clear. Wow.



  • poorgirl
    last year

    We have a show in our basement that has this type of Angle, it has a panel plus a glass pivot door that opens out on the right side of your opening . This is a moulded shower set but it’s the same shape as yours.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Thanks everyone. It has always been a very narrow door opening as this is a master bathroom in a 100 year old house and sometimes you have to work with what you’ve got. We definitely built an odd angle to work with, but we didn’t have a general contractor. We ran this design by an interior designer, an experienced tile setter, and (tried) to run it by the no-show glass door guy. He acted like he could work with whatever scenario and to call him when we were done. Nobody said anything about it, until the shower door guy came, and the bathroom is complete. We now know what we did wrong, and are trying to find a workaround rather than tearing out tile, drywall, and building a new curb which isn’t the best solution . Our other idea was trying to put a fixed glass panel curb to ceiling on that left side, then leaving the angled area open as a kind of walk-in shower. I have seen some 135 degree shower door hinges so we could have the door hinge off a fixed panel on the left, then swing open at the weirdly angled wall.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    The angled opening where a door would have gone is about 24” wide

  • plan2remodel
    last year

    All major shower enclosure companies provide the requirements on their websites: "Neo-angle shower enclosure is constrained by angles: Angles must be either 90 degree or 135 degrees. That is, the corner that is lopped off must be an isosceles triangle to ensure that the door on center meets sides at 135 degree angle." For example, see Shower Enclosure Tips for more explanation on designing a neoangle shower.


    Check your local code on the required opening of the shower. In California, the minimum opening is 22" wide.


    Which of the following is the problem:

    1. The angle is not 135 degrees
    2. The curb was built incorrectly for a neoangle shower
    3. The opening is too small
    4. Something else? Or all the above?


    Did you get a permit for the work? If you pulled the permit, then you are responsible for the design, not the interior designer or the glass door guy.


    At this point, I think your options are (1) install a shower curtain, (2) redo the shower.



  • KW
    last year
    last modified: last year

    @M M - the long side of angled curb is 24"? If CA code is 22" for minimum shower opening, that sounds like enough space for entry no matter where you are. I know that's not your question but I was pondering how wide the entire opening was as in the picture it looks really narrow. I'm wondering if you have an option to not have a door? I can't guess how long that outside shower wall is or how far down the wall the shower head is placed, or even how wide the actual shower is. But I'm wondering if water will splash out the opening since the head is on the short wall & aimed at the long wall. Maybe you can get away with having only the fixed glass panel curb to ceiling on the left? Just a thought. Your wall & floor tile is really pretty!


    PS - just reread your last post & see that you are thinking of what I just said! Guess it depends on the opening size of the long curb side.

  • millworkman
    last year

    "rather than tearing out tile, drywall, and building a new curb"

    Where is the drywall? Please tell me the tile is not installed on top of drywall? What type of waterproofing was used?

  • ker9
    last year

    Measurements of entire shower inside and doorway would help everyone help you.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    I will get measurements tomorrow, great suggestion ker9, and thank you to everyone else here for the suggestions. Millworkman, no, the whole shower is waterproofed and I believe the tile setter used Curdiboard with a Shluter drain system. The problem with partial tearing out and reinstalling a new curb and some tile is that the whole shower would then have to be torn out otherwise the waterproofing system/floors (curb is built into the waterproofing) would be less effective as it would be lapped instead of all integrated in one solid installation. I hope that makes sense. The work done here is all solid and by licensed subs, it was just the framing and that wall angle that wasn’t thought out for the shower door, likely because they assumed we were going for a door less entry. So at this point, we are really trying to find how to get a door in. I’m thinking the curb angle from the straight left wall is 135 degrees which would allow us to install a door that opens on the left, so long as we remove that small base trim notch at the bottom. Open to other suggestions though.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    (We aren’t completely opposed to just doing a glass panel on the left, and leaving the opening, as the shower is close to five feet deep and the shower heads are on the right wall set close to the back. There would be minimal splashing, but the first goal is to get a door and then step back to alternative options from there if that isn’t possible.)

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Oops, door that opens on the right, hinges would be on the left, off the fixed panel. I’m less interested in whose “fault” this is, and more interested in a solution. Explaining that the shower door guy didn’t want to come is an effort to explain why this happened the way that it did. It may be common knowledge to some that certain angles are required for a shower door, but I don’t think the average homeowner would necessarily know this. Between us, our tile setter, and our interior designer, not a single one of us considered a shower door angle. I’m sure a general contractor would, and maybe our tile setter realized this after the fact, but I certainly am not blaming anyone. I do however feel like I did my due diligence in asking the shower door installer to come check our plans beforehand, and in progress, for this very reason. At the end of the day, he didn’t, and I should have sought out someone else. Hindsight is 20/20 but I do think we can find a good solution for this regardless. Living in an older home teaches you very quickly to be flexible and forgiving with imperfection.

  • AJCN
    last year

    Did you have a GC on this or are you GC-ing it yourself?

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    GC-It ourselves, can’t you tell? ;) :)

  • plan2remodel
    last year

    If you want a shower door to hinge on the left to a fixed glass panel, you may need the glass panel to be full height; that is, hinge to the ceiling, as well as to the curb and wall, as if this were a steam shower. There would still remain a gap between the pivot door and the wall on the right-hand side because the curb is incorrect.



    Penthouse II · More Info



  • dawn_89
    last year

    You have yet to address Millwork's comment about the wall that is not plumb. Is that just an optical illusion or is it really out of plumb? If it is, a shower door would be the least of your worries. If it is not plumb, after time it could pull away from the ceiling and you will have tiles crack. So let's hope it's just an optical illusion!

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Dawn_89, that is an optical illusion from the photo angle, it is perfectly straight.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Now I understand what millworkman was talking about. I thought he meant the angle of the curb coming out, which is definitely odd, and what we did wrong. But no, the wall is not slanted at an angle like that. It is plumb, or plumb enough (second shower guy told us no wall is ever truly plumb, but this one is just fine.)

  • teckelhound
    last year

    I'm looking at my shower and trying to see how the layout compares to yours. It seems you could so the same we did. A fixed panel on the left (secured to long wall and immobile). Hinges in middle, door swings outward, door handle close to right wall. Along your right wall, the door would meet just a long strip of clear plastic to make the seal against the edge. This is how ours works anyway. The doorway is 24" wide.





  • plan2remodel
    last year

    See Explanation of neoangle shower with a curb


    "CURB & BUTTRESS INTERFACES
    Always create 90 degree angles to curb buttress faces. This will ensure proper door swing clearances and avoid binding of hinges. Curbs should meet walls at 90 degree angle."


  • teckelhound
    last year

    It was a bad idea to put that one square piece of beige tile as floor trim and allow it to turn the corner of the narrow wall. That also interferes with the door swing. Remove it! The door doesn't have to swing inward--that would eliminate part of your dilemma. It could be an outward swing only. Where it meets the right edge of the doorway, true it will never be correct, but it seems rather than rip things apart, just make up for the little space by being creative with a flexible clear plastic flange, to help close the gap and keep water in.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Teckelhound, I think you are referring to the unpainted base trim. We agree, we plan to remove this so that the door can swing and close correctly rather than catching on the trim.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    We have a glass specialist coming out today to look at a custom solution. He said the things they work with far exceed the difficulty of what we have described. I will share all of your ideas with him and hopefully this will be put to rest. Always love the Houzz community for finding solutions rather than problems!

  • KW
    last year

    @M M , please do update us on your final solution - i will be interesting to know how this story ends!

  • teckelhound
    last year




    I"m so glad you have someone coming today. This should not have to be so hard and stressful. I really think this can be easily achieved. My pony wall is like your strip of floor to ceiling wall on right side of your entry. See how my pony wall have this strip of plastic flange--which also acts as a sort of bumper/door stop. Its probably just cemented in place. Someday if it gets worn and yucky I bet it can be replaced. Our floor is level entry, but yours has the curb to put your glass on, even easier! Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Another project, another lesson learned, that not all subs are created equal or even close. We called another shower door company and they were wonderful. The guy they sent did say this wasn’t their usual shape, and he could see the challenge, but it was far, far from being impossible. He had plenty of resourceful ideas for glass to glass hinges and placement of clamps above the pocket door to help with some of the weight. He also said he could cut the glass at a bit of an angle to help correct for any irregularities, and that it might not be glass right up to the wall like some doors, but it would be pretty darn close. I am almost relieved that the last guy was such a jerk or I would have trusted him that this was an impossible task. This new guy said they have also had many customers come to them after the other guy (relatively small town) told them their project was “impossible.” Thank you, all of you, for reinstalling hope for us and encouraging us that a solution could be found. We are nor DIYers and I nearly crumpled (okay, I did) when the first guy came and said we had built an impossible shower to enclose. I spent hours crying and thinking I had made a terribly expensive mistake, and oh how it served us right for not having a GC. Houzz to the rescue. Such an incredible resource and great group of people. Thanks for saving the day, everyone! Will post photos after door is installed and bathroom complete.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year

    Reinstilling**

  • KW
    last year

    @M M - So glad to read about your successful ending to your shower door challenge! I’ve been following your thread with interest and have been rooting for you because you’ve appeared to be so unflappable about the challenges you’ve run into on what surely is a costly project. Your admission of being “crumpled” reminded me of the first major DIY kitchen project my husband & I did in our first home - had to do with a hole cut in the wrong place - we were majorly crumpled - and broke! So, I get it! I’ll bet most Houzzers do too! 😁

    M M thanked KW
  • teckelhound
    last year

    Hey, that's wonderful news!!! We too went through a brief freak out when we realized after the pony wall was installed that it should have had an angle to it. But like I said, that angle would allow for a door to swing both inward and outward. Our shower is so small that it would be silly to even need that option. But like you, we later realized when looking at door photos that almost all neoangle showers had a certain bend in the wall that allowed for that 90 degree juncture with the door. OOPS!! We too thought we made a huge error in our design (we planned BR ourselves, no GC or architect involved), so I understand your sense of horror, dread, and feeling decisions made were maybe beyond our expertise).


    Anyway, I must add that to make this work our glass shop actually beveled the GLASS DOOR to make the perfect angle with the pony wall. The beveled edge is considered somewhat fragile compared to an edge with two 90 degree square edges, but we are careful people--no children will be touching this door! We've had no problems at all, no leaks or silicone failure. The tile you picked is beautiful. We all cant wait to see the final result.

  • teckelhound
    last year

    One more idea that's kinda off the wall, but did anyone suggest a "saloon door" type configuration? Both with outward swing, or maybe even bidirectional swing? Just a thought FWIW. Good luck.

  • M M
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    You guys are all so awesome and I tell my husband often about the unique community on Houzz. In this gigantic and busy world, this is the neatest old-fashioned community of people who genuinely want to help others. And for that, I am in awe and full of gratitude and warm fuzzy feelings. KW, yes, the crumpled feeling finally hit me that day. My mom came over and helped watch the kids (four and one, another challenging element, ha!) while I finally had a little breakdown and let myself feel sorry for myself for being a dumb-dumb. But as she reminded me, in the grand scheme of life it is just a shower. We have our health and we did our best. In the end, we found a solution thanks to some creative thinkers and all of you. And yes, teckelhound, that is exactly what happened to us! Oops, found out too late that there's a reason for certain shower set-ups! But that is exactly what this sweet and resourceful new shower guy plans to do for us now. He has gotten creative for us and found a solution, which seems to always be possible if you find the can-do folks and helpers. I'm feeling happy and optimistic today. Thanks, everyone!