plumstupid

Luisa plum

plumstupid
August 24, 2013

Hey guys I just ordered a luisa plum for next season and was wondering if any of you guys had any information on it. I'm really curious as to what I need to pollinate it and what kind of sprays and pruning it will require and anything else you may know. Thanks guys.

Comments (49)

  • Tony

    PS,

    I found this on the web. Hope this help you. "'Luisa' Plum, Description:This newly released self-fertile, yellow fleshed plum is exceptionally sweet and juicy. Distinctive elongated-heart shape. Having some disease resistance makes this cultivar easier to grow organically. Maturity: Estimated +35 days âÂÂSanta Rosa'. Pollination:Reported to be self-fertile. Mid-season bloom. Generally crops well. Comments: A Japanese-type plum that is reported to be self-fertile. Consider growing this in your backyard!
    Culture: Reported from overseas to show some resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (bacterial spot)"

    Tony

  • Scott F Smith

    Most Japanese plums are fairly similar to grow so just read up on how to grow a Japanese plum.

    Where did you get this variety? Its only showing up in New Zealand when I search for it.

    Scott

  • plumstupid

    Hey guys I oredered it from raintree. Everything I've seen has it listed as a Euro plum, but other than that we all found the same info. Looks like I will just have to grow this one and find out because I don't think anyone else is growing it.

  • plumstupid

    Hey guys I just wanted to post a follow up on my plum. It grew well and seems to be a very spreading tree with pretty good vigor. Did anyone else purchase this tree this year?

  • Tony

    Plum

    Plz update us with your taste result down the road. I am alway looking for something new to plant.

    Tony

  • plumstupid

    Will do Tony. I was really hoping someone else from Australia, New Zealand or even USA that had grown it would chime in. The only reason I even bought this plum was I bought some plums at a Wal-Mart a few years ago that had a very distinct shape and the best plum I have ever eaten. The shape was unlike any I had ever seen, heart shaped yellow with some red blushing and very long tip on them. I grow several plums and I can say it tasted nothing like any plum I've tried. It was very sweet and aromatic with almost a peach flavor. So of course I spent weeks looking over the web trying to find it and the only match for the shape and flavor descriptions was Louisa and Rain Tree had just started offering it. Well I will try to update this on occasion, and if this ends up being the same plum I tasted from Wal-Mart I'm sure others will want to grow it as well and if not I guess I will just have yet another plum tree.

  • Fascist_Nation

    Raintree now classifies it as a Japanese plum. I wonder what its chill requirements are...where in New Zealand (and Australia?) it has been grown?

    Parentage is apparently unknown and it is classified as a European plum (it does have the flattened look from photos) by some, though its behavior appears more Japanese plum:
    http://www.naturalhub.com/grow_fruit_cultivars_plum_new_zealand.htm

    Looks like an early ripening, odd shaped large plum with a small flattened pit! Great flesh to pit ratio!
    http://www.kings.co.nz/in-the-garden/plant-of-month/july

    http://www.wairere.co.nz/Fruit_and_Nuts/Plum?mi=0amp;fo=&pc=&id=&gid=Plum&col=&show=10&skiprow=20&search=

    http://www.flemings.com.au/fruit_details.asp?CULT_ID=LUISA

    http://www.rolgc.co.nz/plants-we-grow/fruit-trees/

    Here is a link that might be useful: Luisa plum at Raintree

    This post was edited by Fascist_Nation on Wed, Dec 3, 14 at 11:55

  • plumstupid

    The first year raintree offered it they listed it as a European plum but this year it's listed as a Japanese so who knows. I've only grown Japanese plums so hopefully it isn't a euro because I don't have a pollinator. Based on the size of the fruit and description I'm going to assume it is Japanese though. It is on Myro 29C and I was curious if anyone had any experience with this rootstock and if there was anything I needed to know about it.

  • jose_albacete

    Plumstupid Hello, I have great experience with the rootstock Myrobalan 29-C.
    It is a very compatible rootstock with all varieties of apricots and the varieties of plums Japanese, American and European.
    In terms of their behavior in soil, tolerates all soil types (heavy soils, sandy, calcareous) but misbehaves in very moist soils.

    If this were the case, we recommend using the Marianna rootstock GF-81 (It is available in the US), is a magnificent rootstock for plum.
    It has the following advantages:

    Marianna GF-81

    - Resistance to cold winter "good"
    - Adaptation to Different Types of Soil "very good"
    - Resistant to iron chlorosis "very good"
    - Resistant to Choking Root "very good"
    - anchorage to soil "good"
    - Resistance to nematodes "very tough"
    - Tolerance to Agrobacterium tumefasiens "moderately strong"
    - Resistance to root rot, "resistant" and moderately resistant to Verticillium albo-Airum and Armillaria mellea

    So if your soil is not too wet, the rootstock Mirabolan 29-c is right, but if your soil is very wet "encharcadizo" then the appropriate rootstock is Marianna GF-81

    Best Regards
    Jose

  • plumstupid

    Thanks for the information Jose. The soil where my fruit trees are planted drains well so I should be ok. Do you know if there is any problems with suckering with myro 29c?

  • jose_albacete

    Hello again Plumstupid. If your soil drains well the water , don't hesitate a moment, the rootstock mirobolan 29-C , is the most suitable for you .
    Not emits no rebound , the only drawback to , is that the first two years, this rootstock have a slow growth compared with other rootstocks , but from the third year develops very well giving a magnificent productions .

    Plumstupid , i'm going send to you an e-mail for talk in private.

    A great greeting
    Jose

  • jose_albacete

    Hello again Plumstupid. If your soil drains well the water , don't hesitate a moment, the rootstock mirobolan 29-C , is the most suitable for you .
    Not emits no rebound , the only drawback to , is that the first two years, this rootstock have a slow growth compared with other rootstocks , but from the third year develops very well giving a magnificent productions .

    Plumstupid , i'm going send to you an e-mail for talk in private.

    A great greeting
    Jose

  • olpea

    "In terms of [Myrobolan 29c] behavior in soil, tolerates all soil types (heavy soils, sandy, calcareous) but misbehaves in very moist soils."

    I believe you are mistaken Jose. Myro (whether the seedling or the 29c clone) actually tolerates water-logged soils quite well and is recommended for wet soils.

    Not only have I read this quite often, it also matches my experience growing plums on Myro. I've put them in wet enough spots which would kill or stunt most other fruit trees and Myro seems to do fine.

    I wouldn't plant them in a bog, but if the soil gets a little water-logged, Myro should do fine.

  • plumstupid

    Hey Olpea thanks for the info. I always enjoy reading your posts because you are pretty close to my area and your knowledge helps me out a lot. If you have any advice on plum culture in our area feel free to post or email me. I don't really have much to share this year but would you ever be willing to trade scion wood?

  • jose_albacete

    Olphea, the rootstock mirabolan 29-c is very good (I use it as a rootstock in my orchard), and these are their general characteristics:

    Mirabolan 29 - C Selected seedlings California obtained by pollination free Prunus cerasifera. It is the most used in that US state.
    By culture in vitro It spreads well and by cuttings (pre-treatment with AIB 2000 ppm).the trees grafted in the first 3 to 4 years slow growth, and its poor anchorage
    in those early years.
    It adapts well to different soil types From the heavy, moist until sandy.
    To the varieties grafted on it, gives them a force of medium to low. It has a good affinity with Most varieties of Japanese and European plums , and the apricots . Is resistant to M. incognita and M. javanica
    , But is sensitive to Pratylenchus vulnus
    .
    It is moderately resistant to the Agrobacterium tumefasiens
    to Verticillium spp. and Phytophthora spp
    . This rootstock is suitable for variety
    is vigorous planted in fertile soil.

    This makes for very good rootstock (to me is personally one rootstock which I love), but in more difficult terrain conditions, the Marianna GF-81, is more resistant than the rootstock Mirabolan 29-c.
    This is what I wanted to explain to plumstupid.
    For this reason when he told me that your soil drains well, I tell you that the rootstock mirabolan 29-C , It is suitable rootstock.

    Best regards
    Jose

  • jose_albacete

    Hello again Olphea.
    Look, in situations like that you will see in the picture, is where the rootstock Marianna GF-81 marks the difference from the rootstock Mirabolan 29-C (this is an extreme case), but it is a significant example of the issue we are trying .

    [IMG]http://i61.tinypic.com/333d0ty.jpg[/IMG]

    I know this is not your case or the case of plumstupid, but as this question I have made more than once , i wanted to put in value the twoo rootstocks.

    There are and another very good rootstock for the apricot and plum that brings dwarfing character , confers earliness to the grafted variety and greater size of the fruit ,and is extremely resistant to Water Logging .
    Is the rootstock Adesoto é Puebla de Soto ( in a clone improved of the rootstock San Julian , that you have in the United States ) , the latter is a rootstock magnificent , but has a huge problem, and is that emits many sprouts .

    The world of the rootstocks is infinite hahaha

    Best regards
    Jose

  • jose_albacete

    Sorry guys, but this forum is using a different code to upload images, this is the photo I wanted to attach

    {{gwi:2120224}}

    Best regards
    Jose

  • olpea

    Jose,

    I can't imagine plum trees surviving very long submerged in that water, regardless of rootstock.

    Here in the Midwest, we don't have many of the issues you mention. All the pathogenic nematodes you mention are pretty much non-existent here. Likewise, I've never seen Verticillium wilt in peach trees (probably because there aren't nematodes to work in synergy w/ Verticillium). I've never heard of "choking root".

    For myself, I don't like Marianna. It doesn't exhibit any advantages to me in this climate, and it suckers much more than Myro.

    Plumstu,

    What part of MO are you at?

  • plumstupid

    I'm 60 miles south east of kc.

  • olpea

    Plum,

    That would put you around Bulter or Clinton? Maybe I've asked you before where you live. I can't remember. I have a small orchard in Belton, MO, and a backyard orchard at my house Stilwell KS.

    Let me know if you are coming through sometime this winter and I can get you some plum scion wood if you want. Google Tubby Fruits for my Website. You can email me through that.

  • plumstupid

    Hey thanks a lot olpea. I will get in contact with you soon.

  • plumstupid

    I'm near Clinton by the way.

  • Verena Stirnemann-Funnell

    The Luisa plum originated in Nelson Street, Hamilton, New Zealand. My friends Doug and Maria purchased the property about 30 years ago from Polish people and cut pretty much all trees down except for two. One of them was an apple tree and the other an unknown species. They decided to observe it until they knew what it was. It blossomed and then grew fruit they had never seen before. They approached MAF who proceeded to search the world and their finding was that this tree was the only one in existence. They worked with an arborist in Cambridge who sells the trees. The plum was named Luisa after Maria's Guatemalan grandmother.

    And this is the lovely story about the Luisa plum :)

  • Konrad..just outside of Edmonton Alberta

    OH WOW...what a nice story to a nice plum, thank you for sharing this!
    Although I'm zone 3 and can grow Green Gage, rated zone 5, I surely
    would love to experiment on this one! If Louisa is a Japanese plum then it could be even hardier then Green Gage.


  • gman290

    My wife & I have two Luisa trees in our orchard in Maungaturoto, Northland, NZ. We have an abundance of plums, so much so that we are giving them away by the bag. They are not huge trees, but bountiful. Where they are positioned is dry but very windy. One is more exposed than the other. We do nothing for them. They just sit there & then produce loads of fruit & delicious at that. We don't spray at all & if anything, will use DE for the flea beetles. My wife has bottled them but they are better tasting fresh in my opinion. They are great to pick 2-3 days beforehand to ripen. Even though we have high humidity at the moment, 96%, ugh!!, there is very little sign of rot. The peaches & nectarines next to it, are getting rot though. If you can get a tree, it is well worth it. It was great to see the story of where the Luisa came from over here. http://cabbagetreefarm.blogspot.co.nz/2015/02/bottling-plums.html

    Luisa plum tree approx 4 yrs old

  • plumstupid

    Thanks for the info gman. Hopefully this year mine will produce.

  • Bryce Hows

    bryce,

    we have grown 2 trees in Kerikeri, northland ,nz. the trees are a heavy croppers and is good eating , jam, relish and best of all is wine.

  • plumstupid

    Thanks Bryce, no crop for this year but hopefully next year. I'm glad everyone likes it.

  • Jess

    I just bought a Luisa. Im thinking of adding another fruit graft to it. I don't have much room hence needing to add it to the existing tree. Any ideas of what? I live in Perth WA Australia. If it tastes more like a peach I might have to get more of a plumy plum because I brough it as my husband only likes plums.

  • Sandy Rose

    Year two and first fruit from my Luisa in the Bay of Plenty NZ...So much the branches are snapping ...been tying them up and supporting lower boughs ...maybe next year I should thin the fruit out?...all in learning

  • plumstupid

    Wow Sandy, sounds like a great producer!

  • Mack Apaapa

    Hi Sandy I too am in the Bay of Plenty, Whakatane. My Luisa tree is three years old and has produced the most amazing crop. I have a good harvest, This plum is the best. I even removed another variety as I will now take cuttings from this one and produce more trees. I believe the people I bought it from did the same with great success. It does have the nicckname of a Mango plum but I have since learned that there is a variety of that name. A friend came around yesterday and was blown away with the taste. She then shot away and came back with a bottle of vodka. She split a plum in half the long way, took out the seed, and dribbled straight vodka over the top. One of the best alcohol shots I have ever had.


  • Sandy Rose

    It is a lovely tree ..many have admired it This pic is of one tiny branch I swear i dont know how its holding on!! Mack..Whakatane must be the place to grow Luisa ...I live here also. The Vodka shot sounds yum...enjoy!

  • dave99999

    I have been looking around for Luisa Plum, but no luck. Does anyone has
    extras seeds and willing send on my way? I live in Seatac, Washington.

  • jose_albacete

    Hello again guys.
    I have a tremendous problem.
    I am crazy about grafting the plum variety Luisa (in Europe this variety is not available).
    Before in this forum It was possible to contact by private to request an exchange of interesting varieties for both, but now it is not possible to send private messages (or I am stupid and I do not know how to do it) jajajajaja .
    So I have no choice but to do it in a public way.
    I am from Spain and I have many years experience with fruit trees, my collection is huge ( Innumerable varieties of apples, pears, apricots, peaches, flat peaches, nectarines, cherries, pluots , pluerrys , plums , persimmons , etc ...) all my varieties are of high quality.
    Please if any of you have the plum variety Luisa, and would be kind enough to make a cuttings exchange this winter, I would be very grateful.

    This is my e-mail address

    hrsol@hrsol.es

    A very cordial greeting for all, and thanks for your attention
    Jose

  • dave99999

    When is Luisa Plum season in USA? I can't find any plant in Washington State. Hopefully, I can try some fruit this year.

  • puritachoy

    I live in Auckland NZ, I have a Luisa Plum tree with big fruit this year. Unfortunately it was hitted by strong wind yesterday, lots of unriped fruits fell down from the tree. What can I do with this ? Is it possible to make jam or eat ?

    Purita

  • jose_albacete

    Hi Purita,
    Unfortunately if the fruits of your Luisa plum have fallen to the ground without reaching their optimum point of maturation, they will not be useful at all (I regret having to give you this bad news).
    We can not control the weather conditions, for this reason when something like this happens, it's very sad.

    I am from Spain and in Europe this variety of plum is not available.

    I have been looking for this variety of plum for my orchard for many years, you would be so kind to send me some cuttings of your plum Luisa, in your winter (month of July), which would be the beginning of summer in my hemisphere and I could graft it without problems.

    Purita, if you want to contact me, this is my email


    hrsol@hrsol.es

    Best regards

    Jose

  • vermillion237

    Hi Plumstupid. I have tasted Luisa plums. They are delicious, as good as they look! I'm a member of a home orchard society, and have a St Julian A rootstock, trying desperately to find a Luisa plum scion or barefoot tree stateside. Do you still have a tree, and would you be willing to set up an exchange?

  • dave99999

    I am looking for Luisa and Victoria plum seeds. I do have Carolina Reaper Pepper, Pacific Rose Apple, Loquat seeds to trade. Drop me an email if interest.

  • HU-143144648

    Just to add to the mix. My Dad, now deceased, would have been in mid 90's now but he bought me a Luisa plum some years ago because he said it was the same tree that fruited on the shores of a remote harbour on the West Coast of New Zealand when he was a boy growing up there. I grew it successfully and the fruit was beautiful. It is said to be part apricot, part plum.

  • Mack Apaapa

    Just letting all you enthusiasts know that the local garden centres in Bay of Plenty New Zealand have been selling 1 metre trees of Luisa plums. I brought another one for $25 and already the leaves are flourishing. However they have become big sellers.

  • HU-165665423

    Hello, I've had the Luisa plum about 4 yrs. It has always produced lots of fruit but last year half of the fruit was tasteless and not sweet. Could this be to much fruit on the tree or lack of watering? It's in the early fruiting stage now and am considering taking some off. What could the problem be and what could I try? Thanks Andre

  • dave99999

    Can someone from New Zealand tell me the date that plum ready to harvest? I love to get some seeds or tree, but not available where I live (Seattle, Washington State). I heard Raintree have them several years ago and no longer available.

  • Sandy Rose

    Here in Bay of Plenty NZ we harvest early to mid February


  • Mack Apaapa

    Hey dave99999 I have seeds, not sure about the protocol to get them to you though.


  • dave99999

    Mack,

    If you have plenty send me some through mail. I live in Seattle Washington State - USA and gladly return other seeds for exchange. I am still try to find out if I can send you private email. Let me know if you want to do that.

  • Mack Apaapa

    Here's my email

    mack.apaapa.jnr@outlook.com

  • HU-617747457

    I am from NZ up North where the climate is mild. Almost sub tropical in places. Everyone has a Luisa Plum and nobody I know tries very. hard with them. I know they like potash and maybe a Billington Plum for a pollinator. Hope this helps :)

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