joygreenwald

Anyone used Coretec?

joygreenwald
5 years ago

I have searched and searched, but I haven't seen any threads talking about Coretec--tons of other LVP info but nothing about Coretec. We are looking for something interlocking in a blue/ gray plank. The aren't many, or almost any, other options. These look promising, but I'd love some real unbiased information. One of the only other options I can find its a Karndean plank, but it's glue down.

Anyone? Thanks!

Comments (3.7K)

  • Becky Ross
    3 years ago
    Love how hubby did the transitions without transition strips so they are totally flush to the tile and carpet.
  • msuzieqm
    7 months ago
    last modified: 7 months ago


    Coretec Plus Deep Smoked Oak!

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  • AJ D
    7 months ago
    last modified: 7 months ago

    We did Coretec Plus, Alabaster Oak in our basement in 2016 and it has been excellent!! A few spots where the boards could have been tapped together a little better but overall, very pleased!


    One other thing to note.... We should have done a glue down in our basement to prevent the "clapping" sound from some uneven spots in the concrete floor. It has definitely gotten better but a lesson learned!


  • Nancy
    7 months ago

    Abby, you also could have used some self leveler on low spots (and a grinder on high spots). Either glue or leveling would be an extra cost (or extra work for you if you DIY'd it). Still looks beautiful!

  • anirbn
    7 months ago

    Are there useful pointers for finding out reliable online sellers for Coretec ? Has anyone here bought it online and if so, will you please share the two places where you got the lowest prices ? (asking for two suggestions to prevent self advertisement !)

  • PRO
    Joellen Roder- Interior Decor & Staging, Realtor
    7 months ago
    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><md>Hi guys,

    Funny that I got an alert about this post. it's been almost 2 years since we did Cortec downstairs, now we're looking to do the master bedroom, bath and closet. So, needless to say, Cortec has been a winner for us. 3 dogs, 3 kids, 3 adults in this house and it holds up great, doesn't look dirty, when, believe me....I've been working alot so, it is!
  • annieo80
    7 months ago

    Think we are seeing new emails since we are part of the thread. We actually have it throughout our 130 year old home. We started in entry area and kitchen. We choose to use it everywhere due to keeping the thickness the same to avoid trip hazards. It also matched our woodwork beautifully.

  • Bethany
    7 months ago
    last modified: 7 months ago

    Anirbn, I bought my Cortec XL from NiceFloors.com and was super pleased with the price and service.

  • AJ D
    7 months ago

    We bought our CORETec from Nebraska Furniture Mart on line and installed ourselves. Very competitive prices on flooring!

  • Gina S
    7 months ago

    I thought I saved the micro-fiber mop and recommended cleaner in my "ideas" on Houzz. I can't find it. Can you tell me which mop you like and what cleaner to use? I thought they'd give me a starter bottle but I didn't get anything.

  • Bethany
    7 months ago

    Gina, i’m still using the Hoover Floormate and OdoBan pH neutral floor cleaner. But for quick traffic area touch ups I use this:


    https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01M4S1ZB0/ref=ya_aw_oh_bia_dp?ie=UTF8&psc=1

  • annieo80
    7 months ago

    I used Bona brand for cleaning. I have found that I need to mop the direction of the grain.

  • Gina S
    7 months ago

    Thank you, Annie. I ordered to Bona mop. I never heard that about using the mop in the direction of the grain. I think it is best to use just a damp mop most of the time and then occasionally (maybe monthly?) use a neutral ph cleaner. I got shaw to use for cleaning the floors. It says "no rinse" but after seeing the problems some people are having with their LVP I will rinse to be on the safe side.

  • PRO
    Oak & Broad
    7 months ago

    @ Mike Brewer did the manufacturer say why they would not honor warranty. ?

  • anirbn
    7 months ago

    There is a lot of opinion floating in a specific Adura Max thread but I suspect it may be dominated by a few interested parties. Anyone here care to share if they considered Adura and how they decided in the end ? Sorry for the bother, but this is sizable investment for us and Adura does seem to be less expensive.

  • floey
    7 months ago

    I have Adura Max Meridian Stucco 6x48” planks that we put in the kitchen last year and I love it. It’s very light but easy to see the dirt. I don’t know what you are talking about above because I get alerts as I used to be on this thread for Cortec which we put in down the shore about 4 years ago.(haven’t really been following it.). I like the Adura Max. I know these floors are always updating their products so I don’t know what Cortec is doing now.

  • floey
    7 months ago

    I forgot to add why we picked Adura Max Meridian Stucco. Because I did not want a wood-looking floor in my kitchen because I have hardwood floors throughout the house and didn’t want to try and match it. Also I wanted a light floor. So it’s not a wood-look floor, more of a stone look. And, Adura Max had just what I wanted.

  • anirbn
    7 months ago

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I asked the question because there is a thread titled "Adura Max vs. Coretec". It looks like that the thread was started by the CEO of a company that is obviously very interested in promoting Adura and a lot of comments in that thread are from a few (probably interested) parties. I wanted to get the opinion of a separate pool of people and thats why asked the question about the comparison here in this thread.

  • Nancy
    7 months ago
    last modified: 7 months ago

    The Adura Max vs Coretec thread has really been taken over by discussions of Supercore. Don’t just go by the intro post.

  • Mike Brewer
    7 months ago

    CVoretex US Floors and now Shaw Floors. used the laminate water proof with cork backing 2.5 years had to remove $7,000.00 worth of floor due to moisture damage. Mfg will not take care of it.

  • Gina S
    7 months ago
    last modified: 7 months ago

    That is awful @Mike Brewer -- what is their reason for not taking care of it?? What is the moisture damage that you're experiencing? Is it under the planks? I saw a video of someone who took their LVP out -- let it dry and the subfloor dry -- and then reinstalled it after a hurricane. I imagine that would be so hard to put them back in place but with a good method it might work.

    Not the video I saw but you might see how it works


    video

  • Bethany
    7 months ago
    last modified: 7 months ago

    Gina, Mike’s installer didn’t use the required vapor barrier under his floor.....that is an installation problem and not a manufacturer problem, so of course they didn’t cover it. I’m not sure why he keeps leaving that pertinent detail out.

    Before I had my Cortec installed, the first thing I did was read the installation instructions online and make sure my installer was going to be doing everything needed to ensure my floor met the warranty requirements. He also didn’t think I needed a vapor barrier, so I did 2 things....1) I called the company where I bought it (Nicefloors.com) and confirmed it was needed, and 2) I went straight to Home Depot, spent $50 on a big roll and plopped it down in front of him.

    Should we have to do that? No. But better safe than sorry.

  • Gina S
    7 months ago

    That is great info, @Bethany. I hope many people see this!!

  • Chessie
    7 months ago

    anirbn that thread is actually more of a Supercore thread - and it is great for anyone looking for information on that product.

  • Gina S
    7 months ago

    @Bethany reflecting on this a little further ... aside from searching online where/when is this information given to consumers that a vapor layer is required. You said you read it online -- is it included in the box and easily available for consumers? If not, that doesn't seem like a fair way of voiding a warranty.

  • Anirban Banerjee
    7 months ago

    One more question - quarter moulding from Coretec seems to be quite expensive. Did anyone find a good alternative ? I could not find specific suggestions although I did find references to alternatives.

  • Chessie
    7 months ago

    Gina S here are the online installation instructions. It looks to me like they are saying that it is in installers responsibility to make sure it is "done right", and if it isn't, then it's the installer's responsibility to fix it. Period. Pretty much a CYA in my view.



    https://pdmsview.shawinc.com/viewer/doc/5091



    I. GENERAL INFORMATION

    All instructions and recommendations should be followed for a satisfactory installation.

    • Acclimation of material prior to installation is not required however the floor covering should be installed in a climate controlled environment with a temperature between 55° - 85°F (13°-29°C) or average temp. of 70 degrees (21.1°).
    • Post installation temperature range is between -25 and 155 degrees F (-31.6°- 68.3°C).
    • Avoid exposure to direct sunlight for prolonged periods, doing so may result in discoloration. During peak sunlight hours, the use of the drapes or blinds is recommended. Excess temperature due to direct sunlight can result in thermal expansion and UV fading.
    • Install product after all other trades have completed work that could damage the flooring.
      • If cabinets are to be installed on top of the flooring (including islands), that area of material must be fully adhered to the subfloor (including an additional 2’ft beyond the cabinets and islands).
    • To minimize shade variation, mix and install planks from several cartons.
    • Inspect all planks for damage before installing. If you have any concerns about the product fit or finish, call Shaw Information Services at 1-800-441-7429. Claims will not be accepted for flooring that has been cut to size and/or installed.
    • Use cementitious patching and leveling compounds that meet or exceed maximum moisture level and pH requirements. Use of gypsum-based patching and/or leveling compounds which contain Portland or high alumina cement and meet or exceed the compressive strength of 3,000 psi are acceptable.
    • Installation Methods: Floating (on, above or below grade) / Glue Down (on, above or below grade)
    • Required perimeter expansion spacing for Floating or Glue Down installation is as follows:
      For areas less than 2500 sq ft, use 1/4" gap
      For areas larger than 2500 sq ft. use 1/2" gap.
    • This flooring is waterproof and reliably secures the flooring panels on all four sides. However, excessive moisture in the subfloor could promote mold, mildew, and other moisture related issues like the trapping of moisture emissions under the flooring, which may contribute to an unhealthy indoor environment.
    • Additional layer of 6 mil poly film or equal vapor retarder with a perm rating of 1 or less may be used as an additional layer of protection.
    • A second underlayment is allowed under any currently sold SPC Product with attached underlayment in a residential application. If installed over a second underlayment, this underlayment cannot be greater than 3 mm thick. IIC (ASTM E492-09) and STC (ASTM E90-09) lab testing on certain SPC products tested with and without a second layer of underlayment, to date, does not indicate that a second underlayment will provide additional acoustic benefit.

    A. WOOD SUBFLOORS

    Do not install material over wood subfloors that lay directly on concrete or over dimensional lumber or plywood used over concrete. Refer to ASTM F1482 for panel underlayment recommendations.

    1. Do not apply sheet plastic over wood subfloors.
    2. Basements and crawl spaces must be dry. Use of a 6 mil black polyethylene is required to cover 100% of the crawl space earth. Crawl space clearance from ground to underside of joist is to be no less than 18” and perimeter vent spacing should be equal to 1.5% of the total square footage of the crawl space area to provide cross ventilation. Where necessary, local regulations prevail.

    3. All other subfloors - Plywood, OSB, particleboard, chipboard, wafer board, etc. must be
    structurally sound and must be installed following their manufacturer’s recommendations.
    Local building codes may only establish minimum requirements of the flooring system and may
    not provide adequate rigidity and support for proper installation and performance. If needed
    add an additional layer of APA rated underlayment, fasten and secure according to the
    underlayment manufacturer’s recommendations.

    4. Resilient flooring is not recommended directly over fire-retardant treated plywood or preservative treated plywood. An additional layer of APA rated 1/4" thick underlayment should be installed.

    B. CONCRETE SUBFLOORS

    NEW AND EXISTING CONCRETE SUBFLOORS SHOULD MEET THE GUIDELINES OF THE LATEST EDITION OF ACI 302 AND ASTM F 710, “STANDARD PRACTICE FOR PREPARING CONCRETE FLOORS TO RECEIVE RESILIENT FLOORING” AVAILABLE FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND MATERIALS, 100 BARR HARBOR DRIVE, WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, PA 19428; 610-832-9585; HTTP://WWW.ASTM.ORG.

    1. Floors shall be smooth, permanently dry, clean, and free all foreign material such as dust, wax, solvents, paint, grease, oils, and old adhesive residue. The surface must be hard and dense, and free from powder or flaking.
    2. New concrete slabs must be dry. Maximum moisture level per CaCl test method is 8 lbs. per 1000 in 24 hr. Maximum level for ASTM 2170 In-situ Relative humidity test method - 90%.
    3. Do not install over concrete with a history of high moisture or hydrostatic conditions. Excessive moisture in the subfloor could promote mold, mildew, and other moisture related issues like the trapping of moisture emissions under the flooring, which may contribute to an unhealthy indoor environment. Shaw Industries does not warrant nor is responsible for damage to floor covering due to moisture related issues.
    4. pH level of concrete should be between 7-10.
    5. The final responsibility for determining if the concrete is dry enough for installation of the flooring lies with the floor covering installer.

    NOTE: IT MAY NOT BE THE FLOOR COVERING INSTALLER'S RESPONSIBILITY TO CONDUCT THESE TESTS. IT IS, HOWEVER, THE FLOOR COVERING INSTALLER'S RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THESE TESTS HAVE BEEN CONDUCTED, AND THAT THE RESULTS ARE ACCEPTABLE PRIOR TO INSTALLING THE FLOOR COVERING. WHEN MOISTURE TESTS ARE CONDUCTED, IT INDICATES THE CONDITIONS ONLY AT THE TIME OF THE TEST.




  • Bethany
    7 months ago

    Gina - the instructions are included in every box.


    Chessie - it looks like they updated the install language since they were acquired by Shaw. But you can see that they mention a vapor barrier (both on top of the subfloor and above a crawl space) in multiple places. They are basically saying that you can’t put this flooring over a damp floor and expect it to be mold free.


    One of my observations pretty early in the thread (which I know is super hard to search) was that the attached cork backing might be a problem. A prior poster shared that her home flooded and a bunch of chemicals washed into the house from the garage, and permeated the cork with a horrible smell. That meant it all had to be replaced. BUT if you had LVP without an attached underlayment, you could have probably dried it out and reused it. Just something to consider if you are placing LVP in a place more likely to get wet like a basement or bathroom.

  • Anirban Banerjee
    6 months ago

    We are planning to install COREtec Plus XL on concrete floors. Besides using a 6 mil vapor barrier, will installing an additional underlayment provide better support against vertical denting and/or provide better heat insulation ? This is at ground level, i.e. underneath is the foundation.


    We are also planning to install COREtec Plus XL Enhanced on previously installed vinyl (glued) flooring in our basement. Anything to consider differently here ? Planning the 6 milm vapor barrier here anyway.

  • cbreeze
    6 months ago

    I think you are good to go with the vapor barrier. However, I would make sure your floors are level. I put mine down on concrete floor with sound/vapor barrier but there are a few soft spots because of dips on the floor. The sound barrier was required by my condominium.

  • anirbn
    6 months ago

    cbreeze, thanks very much for the comment. Very much appreciate it.

  • Bethany
    6 months ago

    AnirNan, Cbreeze is 100% right about the floor being as level as possible. There is a VERY small acceptable variance (3/8” across 10ft if I am remembering correctly). Your contractor may need build some areas up, or grind down others. This is the most important part of the install, and I had to once again go buy self leveling concrete and make my flooring guy use it. (he typically laid tile and just relied on mortar to level out things, sigh). It pays off to hire the RIGHT people if you want the job done right.

  • Nancy
    6 months ago

    Anirbn, I believe since Coretec already has the attached cork that there is a limit on additional underlayment being added. It's been a while since I installed mine, it should be in the installation instructions? Or call the company. If you do too much underlayment and make the floor too cushy, the joints between planks can flex too much and can fail.

  • anirbn
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    I received a lot of very useful information at this forum. So thought, I would share my experience with vendors. I shopped around a lot. Finally got the best price from Be$tlaminate They are a physical store. So you are not dealing with an online only entity. They gave me the best prices, shipped in two separate shipments as the two different kind of floorings each became available. Finally, when I reported damaged boxes, without a hassle they gave me the offer of sending replacements. Highly recommended.

  • kathiesail
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    After MONTHS of researching many floor options we decided on COREtec stone cork back flooring. We spoke with two COREtec reps re putting this over our 35 year old terrazzo floor. ...on which we never had moisture issues. Both said we do not need a barrier

    Just to be sure we moisture tested our floor with result of zero moisture

    We bought 1000sq feet to install. Not easiest floor to install but we have done many and got almost 1/3 of total flooring down


    Almost 1/3 of the pieces were bouncy and noisy when walked on. We held off finishing flooring and took video and a “warped” piece to the place we purchased flooring THEY WERE AWESOME and spoke with COREtec that stated they should not be like that but that WE should have checked every piece before we installed... NOTHING was ever said by COREtec reps or floor dealers regarding the need to check every piece carefully.

    DO THEY NOT HAVE QUALITY CONTROL

    So. Our floor dealer got COREtec to give us new boxes of tile. He also thought they should pay for time to take up the flooring and relay but COREtec felt that was not their concern

    Then we started pulling up the original pieces that had been installed and there was an immediate musty-moldy smell on the cork side but absolutely NO signs of moisture. COREtec cork back vinyl has some major problems...They market themselves as high quality products and charge for that. I highly discourage anyone from using this product

  • Mike Brewer
    3 months ago

    After a couple years the cork was all moldy. The installer did not use any moisture barrier as now the mfg does not recommend using it. We have now pulled up all of our Coretec and threw away. The flooring also dents very easily and cuts way too easily. We do not recommend this product.

  • Moggy Cat
    3 months ago

    Coretec Noble Oak


  • Chessie
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    Wow that is pretty!! But with all the post-install issues I keep reading about, they would have to implement a major change in the product before I would consider it.

  • Moggy Cat
    3 months ago

    This is the premium plus line so I’m hoping there won’t be issues. The thing I’m concerned about is my installer insisted a moisture barrier was not necessary. It was installed over a cement slab in a new construction home. I should have insisted but he was adamant this barrier was not necessary. Anyone know if I should be concerned or not?

  • Nancy
    3 months ago

    Moggy Cat, yes be concerned. Slabs have to be aged a certain number of months before that type of flooring is installed. I believe it should be in the installation instructions. I believe they also should do some sort of moisture test.


    Look into this now, don't wait to get mold/damaged flooring!

  • Moggy Cat
    3 months ago

    The slab was about eight months old when the flooring was installed but I still think a moisture barrier should have been placed underneath. My installer immediately dismissed the suggestion. He went as far as saying that a moisture test was conducted when the measurements were taken although I observed no such thing. I had gotten an estimate with another installer prior to that and he also said the moisture barrier was not necessary. Odd thing is when I read the manufacturer instructions it said this barrier should be installed. It is so confusing. A barrier is not expensive and I don’t think it is too time consuming to include.Why are installers resistant to it? Do I have legal recourse should a mold issue develop in the future?

  • Mike Brewer
    3 months ago

    No mfg refused to take care of ours as they state any mold or mildew is not warrantied.

  • Moggy Cat
    3 months ago

    I wonder if there is legal recourse with the installer though. Aren’t installers supposed to follow the manufacture’s instructions? There should be an obligation to do the job they were hired for in a correct manner. Was your mold issue a result of a a leak/water damage?

  • jenwinston73
    3 months ago

    Is a vapor barrier recommended for a 2nd floor? Our contractor said he thought we should use one, but I read somewhere that it created a funny sound when walking on it. I think what I’m reading, if I am understanding correctly, is that you only need to use a vapor barrier over concrete slab. So for our 2nd floor we wouldn’t need one. Is that correct? We are installing Coretec Calypso Oak soon. I’m really excited but also nervous because I’ve read too much on the internet!

  • jenwinston73
    3 months ago

    I should clarify.... our first floor is a basement. So our 2nd floor is actually ground level. I’m not sure if that matters but wanted to explain just in case. The basement runs the entire square footage of the floor above it, except for a new addition that we will be building. This one room will have a crawl space under it. We are planning on using LVP throughout (rooms above basement, new room above crawl space, and basement).

  • Nancy
    3 months ago

    Moggy Cat, I do think you'd have recourse against the installer, provided their estimate specifically says "no vapor barrier needed" or some such. If/when you sue them, they're gonna try and say that they told you it was needed and you refused. So start assembling your documentation now. Save texts and emails if you have them. If you're in a state that allows recording of conversations, call them and tell them you're worried and record them saying "I told you last month a vapor barrier wasn't necessary". (Some states allow recordings in court even without the other party's permission or knowledge beforehand). Consult an attorney (because I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night).


    You could consider pulling up the floor and reinstalling with a vapor barrier. You would break some of the click/lock mechanism so might need to buy more flooring. You can use painters tape and label all the cut ends so you can reinstall in the same place. And you'd incur more installation expenses unless you wanted to do it yourself (it could be done a bit at a time so you wouldn't have to move everything out, but you'd have a little unfinished strip between newly laid floor and old floor as you progressed).


    Jenwinston, I would not think a vapor barrier would be needed on a floor above a basement. Now if the basement is super humid/wet it might not be a bad idea. I believe a vapor barrier IS needed above a crawl space. It's not super expensive so doesn't hurt to use it just in case.

  • jenwinston73
    3 months ago

    @Nancy - Thanks for your input. I guess I’m more afraid of it sounding funny/plasticy with the vapor barrier. Otherwise I’d use it all over just to be safe. I read a review where someone was complaining about that. Does that just mean they used a cheap kind or it wasn’t installed correctly?

  • Chessie
    3 months ago

    Moggy Cat

    I wonder if there is legal recourse with the installer though. Aren’t installers supposed to follow the manufacture’s instructions? There should be an obligation to do the job they were hired for in a correct manner. Was your mold issue a result of a a leak/water damage?


    I doubt you have any recourse with the installer UNLESS he is a "certified" installer with CoreTEC. Yes they ARE supposed to follow manufacturer's instructions because otherwise there is ZERO recourse with the company. I had a certified installer put in my Armstong LVT - but they did NOT follow proper installation methods, and in fact I emailed Armstrong and sent a ton of pictures. Then I sent my installation company the information that Armstrong sent back - eventually they got in touch with each other and my entire floor was pulled up, new product ordered and re-installed correctly.

  • Nancy
    3 months ago

    Jenwinston, if it sounds plasticy I would think it’s a combination of vapor barrier AND floor movement (surface irregularities not addressed prior to installation, so the floor moves and hits/moves the plastic).


    There are other options for a vapor barrier, there are membranes such as floor muffler which act as a vapor barrier but aren’t plasticy. Only issue would be making sure Coretec would still honor their warranty if you used that (there are limits on thickness of additional underlayments for most floating click floors). I’m thinking Coretec max is 3 mm but don’t quote me on that.



  • jenwinston73
    3 months ago

    Ok so maybe the subfloor was not leveled properly prior to install in the case I mentioned. Good to know that it shouldn’t make this sound.

  • jack_bauer
    last month

    We are considering coretec stone lucina in our bathroom above grade.. it currently has vinyl sheet which I pulled up because there was some moisture damage to the plywood under it.. I was thinking of pulling up the sheet and plywood through the bathroom and using KILLZ on the subfloor and the adding some vapor barrier underlayment and then coretec stone. I’m worried the joints (beveled) will still leak moisture and get to the cork below.. has anyone used coretec stone or has feed back on what I’m planning to do?