jenathegreat

DIY copper countertop

jenathegreat
16 years ago

We'd like to cover our countertop base with copper sheeting. We've found it locally and online in 3'x10' sheets in either 16 oz or 20 oz.

We've never worked with metal, but since there are only 2 straight runs of countertop, we'd only have to cut out a hole for the sink and cooktop, and bend the metal to cover the edge of the plywood. We plan to bend it over and under the base and fasten it to the bottom and also have it curve up the wall to form a little backsplash.

1) See any problems with this plan? Anything wrong with using copper sheeting?

2) Will we be able to bend it without any special tools? What will we need to cut it with? I really have no concept of how hard or flexible either 16oz or 20oz copper sheets would be.

3) Recommend either 16 or 20oz?

4) How do we handle the outside corner?

Thanks for any advice or warnings...

Comments (160)

  • freedee
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I put an edge on my copper countertops that is really cool. I used a 20 oz sheet of copper and pulled it around a bulnose edge. Under the bullnose, a put an odge edge shaped piece of molding that was wraped in a much lighter weight copper. The lighter wieght copper would not hold up for a countertop but for the piece of trim below the bullnose it's fine. It looks really substancial. It reads as one piece. If someone shows me how to post a photo on here, I will.

  • cp_cambrdge
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    OK,
    So I've nearly finished my project and have two more pieces of information for people:
    1) the TC-20 glue is really great stuff. no nasty odors, easy to cleanup, great adhesion. I think that the only place you can find it is online, but I strongly recommend it.
    2) if you use "just for copper" make sure you get the "epoxy putty" . They also make a more liquid product that comes in a copper colored bottle but DOES NOT have copper particles in it. Very disappointing, and now I need to order some to complete my project. Table looks great otherwise, now I just have to attach it to the base.

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  • busybme
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    freedee, store your pictures online at a photo hosting site such as Photobucket (it's free and works well). Then, when you are at Photobucket viewing the picture that you want to add to your post, you will see 'tags' listed near the picture: these are long extended address/links to your picture.

    Choose the 'tag' for posting to message boards by right-clicking on that 'tag' then choose 'copy'. Come back here and type your post. Then right click and 'paste' yout 'tag' into your post. When you preview your message, your picture should show up.

    I'm not very good at posting pictures myself so I hope these instructions work! Looking forward to seeing that special edge treatment that you did!

    cp,I'm excited for you to be almost done! Was it harder than you expected? Please share. : )

    Sandy

  • busybme
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Actually, for GardenWeb you'll want to chose the image link that is labeled 'Blogs' in order to post your pictures. Sorry 'bout that. I think the rest of the instructions are correct, though.

  • mcleroy
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I read in these posts that a copper countertop had to be grounded. Would someone please address that issue? How to do? Am planning electrical outlets in my island with DIY copper countertop 48" x 96".
    Thanks

    McLeroy

  • steve1234
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Nice topic. Good legs too as this has been going for years....

    Thanks to all for sharing your experience. I'm working on a range hood that i would like to cover with copper. I'm looking for suggestions on the guage of copper to use for a surface with a curved profile. I want it thick enough to not "wrinkle" but thin enough to easily form to the suface.

    here's an attempt at describing how concave the sides are:

    Picture a rectangular section on the ceiling (with one of the long sides up against the wall) and a chimney like hood extending from this rectangular cross section on the ceiling down towards the range. The two sides flare out (left and right) as it comes down and the front flares out away from the wall.

    The three sides of the hood are concave (the fourth side is the wall) and extend from the ceiling down to the base which sits above the range. If you were to take a string from where the hood surface meets the ceiling and pull it straight to the bottom edge of the hood. The approx mid point along the length of the string would be approx 4" off the surface of the hood.

  • busybme
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Steve, what material are you using for the construction of the hood? I can picture the design but am not clear on the construction.

  • steve1234
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    2x4 rectangle frame mounted to the ceiling. 3/4" plywood box at the bottom of the hood. The width and depth (from the wall) of the 3/4" plywood box is sized to the range. the "bottom" of the box is cut out to accept the stainless hood power pack. The Height of the lower box is about 6" and this will have a piece of faux stone edging applied.

    To get the curve profile I used strips of 3/4" plywood with the curve profile cut along the long edge of the strip. I installed these strips (2 on each end and 3 in the front) between the upper 2x4 frame and the lower 3/4" plywood box. These strips basically made up vertical "ribs" running from the upper retangular frame to the lower framer. I then took lengths of 1/2" plywood strips (about 1-1/2" wide) and attached them horizontally on the vertical ribs. I notched the ribs so the horizontal strips were "inset" in the edge of the rib. I tied the horizontal strips toghether where they met in the corners. The strips were approx 6-8" apart. Basically the strips looked like ladder rungs that followed the curved profile of the vertical ribs. I then took a piece of 1/4" (nom) luan ply, wet one side, and formed it (pushed it) to the profile of the vertical ribs. A row of screws along each horizontal "rung" holds the ply to the profile. Prior to screwing the ply to the horizontal ribs it was easy enough to hold it and mark the edges (basically a dashed curved line with the dashes being where the horizontal rungs meet). That compound curved line could then be cut in the flat prior to the plywood being attached to the frame. The ply is just the right stiffness to maintain the curve without getting "flat bars" where it is screwed to the horizontal rungs.

    The result is a frame that is all tied together with a plywood skin over the top. The curve on the outer ply is really pretty smooth. There are quite a few screw heads (c-sunk) that need to be filled to make the complete surface smooth prior to the application of the copper. With all the ribs, horizontal rungs, and the rows of screws attaching the ply to the rungs, the structure is quite solid.

    This would be easier if I could figure out how to attach a picture......

  • busybme
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Pictures of your project would be great! I would like to attempt it myself.

    A couple messages up, Steve, I listed out how to post a picture. You need to host it somewhere online (Photobucket is easy) and then copy and paste the 'tag' (address) into the message that you are typing here. For GardenWeb, use the tag labeled for blogs.

    I love this topic and plan to cover my island in copper and now, because of your design, plan to do a custom copper hood, as well!

    What hood insert did you use and how did you mount that to your hood/wall?

    Sandy

  • steve1234
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    OK, here's a go at the pictures....

    We used a Kobe insert. It was the most cost effective for the CFM we needed for the range. You can get two pieces, the power pack and an optional liner. The liner is a stainless tray that covers more of the range. My dealer had a damaged liner that he offered for $0. I was able to fix it so that made the deal even better. To us the Kobe seemed similar to the others.

    In the pictures you can see the lower "plywood" box. This was sized and built to accept the Kobe power pack. One side is attached to the wall, and it is cantilevered out. In one of the picture you can see the metal strapping I ran from the outside of the lower plywood box up to the ceiling. This provides the support for the cantilevered lower box.

    [IMG]http://i368.photobucket.com/albums/oo129/ssto101/hoodreadyforcopper.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://i368.photobucket.com/albums/oo129/ssto101/powerpackin.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://i368.photobucket.com/albums/oo129/ssto101/completframe.jpg[/IMG]

  • steve1234
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Ok this time with pictures (really)

  • hosenemesis
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    What a fabulous thread.
    Thanks to all of you who took the time to tell us how you completed your projects. Steve, that's a beautiful design.

  • busybme
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Steve, that is something! Can't wait to see the pictures of the finished product!

  • steve1234
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Yea, I can't wait, also. Too bad it's down a few rungs on the remodel priority list (behind walls, floors, and countertops). Check back after the new year...

  • joe_in_sd
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Stumbled across this thread while looking for some copper counter pictures to show the wife (as opposed to the cold industrial look of stainless that she is after) and figured I would offer a few additional comments for people looking at DIY copper counter tops.

    Copper in and of itself is a very durable and long lasting material. With the proper base you can use relatively thin sheet (i.e. - not expensive and easier to work with). I like to use a base made of baltic birch plywood (great screw holding and dimensionally stable). MDF will work well enough, but I prefer birch for its strength.

    The edge dressing which is mentioned here is a fairly easy and workable option. For those who feel like learning a new skill, you might consider hammering seamless edges instead though. You will likely want to get a few copper scraps to practice with and a set of peening hammers (better automotive repair supply stores will have them in the auto body section). I won't go into the details here, but a lot of light taps are what you are looking for here. Watch out for work hardening though as that will result in splits in the copper. If you want to do the seamless route - you will need to go with slightly thicker copper as the added material is needed during the stretching process in areas like corners.

    As far as the brazing option goes - you really will want to go with oxy-acetelene. Again, practice and patience is important. I usually braze corners before adhering it to a wood base in order to avoid the fire hazard. The other issue is that it is hard to get a sheet of copper hot enough with a small propane torch in order to get the brazing solder to flow properly.

    For copper bar edging, you can get pretty crazy if you like. I normally prefer to use a 3/8" bar as opposed to the thinner bar in order to do some additional edge detailing. On the router table, I'll put a roundover on the bottom edge of the bar in order to soften it up some. Once that is done install on the counter top. Apply the top section and use a flush trim bit to remove any access metal from the top. Follow up with a 1/8 or 1/4" roundover on the top as well. This takes care of any sharp edges and the process of routing also pushing the two copper edges together making them almost invisible.

    For dealing with joints on the top sheet - brazing is really your best (and IMO only choice). If you don't have the equipment or don't feel comfortable - don't worry too much. Call around to various local shops (sheet metal, roofers, plumbers) to find someone who has experience working with copper). Most of them will do the work for you to join the two sheets. Once that is done carefully bring the assembled sheet home for installation as normal as if it were a single straight sheet.

  • tmbrlinewarden
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hello all! I totally love this thread and have visited it many times over the past few years. This is the sort of thing one hopes to find (but rarely does) when searching for information, understanding and help on the internet.

    I hope to have some DIY copper projects to share on here in the next 8 months. I have a plan I'd like to run by you all and get your input. I have two (free) small identical refrigerators I plan on installing (built-into-a-cabinet style) side by side with the doors opening opposite to imitate the look and utility of one of those big (expensive) commercial units. Energy use is also slightly less, especially with the additional insulation I plan. I hate the look of stainless steel which is the current rage, and am planning to cover the fridge doors with copper and custom-making (welding/brazing/casting) copper door handles. I've had some tell me that it would be "too much"- i.e. too much of a copper look and am wondering what you guys think. My countertops will be hardwood butcher-block style that I salvaged from an old basketball court (also for free- my uncle's B-ball C-tops turned out amazing!) and my sink will be a DIY concrete apron front, and only plan on copper fixtures and accents overall. If it will not be too much use of the copper I may surface the oven front with copper too (my rangetop is also a customized industrial version of an older (cheap) gas range using mostly industrial steel grates- Ive got more skills than money). what do you think- dark-aged copper appliances a good look? Anyone with experience laminating metal with copper sheeting have any advice for me??

    Also- in reference to Steve's range hood (awesome work!) You could get away with much lighter gauge copper on your hood than on a Countertop, but I'd follow Aliceinwonderlands model and use heavier gauge sheeting for the top curved part, laying the front last using the copper epoxy at the seams and not get too imaginative with the curved seams. with the heavy gauge and epoxy it should look like a welded seam and serve a maintenance-free lifetime. On the bottom, you could do any number of a thousand things with copper sheeting, channel, bar stock, or even copper tubing to give it a custom fabricated look. If youll be tiling the kitchen, you could run a complimentary row of tiles along there. Id love to see and hear your ideas and of course a time-laps photo journal of your copper work.

  • gunksny
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Great thread! Love all the advice, ideas and pics!

    I've been looking for non traditional ideas for an outdoor countertop/bar/kitchen. Do you think copper would work for this or would the maintenence be a nightmare? It would be part of a 12 ft L shaped structure with a built in grill on a deck.

  • luvhorses
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    aliceinwonderland-id

    Your counters are fabulous!

    Steve1234
    Your hood design is awesome! I was on the verge of purchasing an entire hood unit for an amount really out of my budget but now think I'll follow your lead! I'm hoping you'll post finished pictures.
    After reading this thread, I've been "re-inspired" re: my new-build which is at about the half-way point. My floors will be concrete and now definitely considering copper for countertops!

    Thanks to all of you for the abundance of functional ideas and information and especially for unselfishly sharing your projects and experiences!

  • pjb999
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    All of the pictures look beautiful and I love copper for its patina, but aren't any of you worried about copper toxicity? It is a heavy metal and it looks like none of you plan to seal/overcoat it, I'd be reluctant to put any foodstuffs directly on it (not that I'd put, say, raw meat on anything but stainless, probably not even granite.

    That being said, beautiful work!

  • wolfgang80
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Thank you so much for your generous postings. Your copper countertops are beautiful.

    One question, could you apply these same installation techniques to galvanized metal?

  • berniluke
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Actually copper is safer than stainless steel. Go here to read more about it:
    http://www.copper.org/consumers/copperhome/FAQ_Main.html

    "Unsealed, it provides an antimicrobial surface 30 times more effective than stainless steel"

    Copper cookware is highly valued and has been for generations.

  • pontevedra
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Extremely grateful to have found this site.

    I have two questions:
    1) what material are you using for the sink?
    2) I have found .0323 thick copper locally, is this okay for the countertop?
    Appreciate your responses.

  • pjb999
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I have no doubt copper is an effective bacteriacide, since many antifungals etc are copper based, I am more questioning reaction with foods...

    Most copper cookware I know of these days is lined with something else, I agree, copper's thermal qualities are excellent and I had a great set of stainless/copper bottomed cookware which my ex-wife now owns...

    People may have used copper as cookware etc for generations, but that doesn't mean it's safe. The Romans used a lead comb dipped in vinegar to get rid of grey hair. I don't think Grecian 2000 contains any lead.

    My concern was direct food contact with the counter, eg meats etc or something acidic which might also discolour it. Would I put meat directly on granite? Probably not. On stainless I might, although I'm prepared to admit it's mostly psychological (I don't know what the recommendations are regarding granite.)

    Don't get me wrong, I find the idea of copper countertops intriguing, they just sort of scare me at the same time.

  • russellrobertson
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    pjb999,
    I understand what you are saying about the difference between copper cookware and food contacting copper countertops, as food does not actually contact the copper used in cookware. I think a better analogy than cookware would be copper plumbing. I imagine that if the water running through your house's plumbing doesn't become toxic due to its contact with copper, a T-Bone hitting your counter will probably not be too dangerous.

    With that said, I have no idea if copper plumbing is sealed in any way.

  • Circus Peanut
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Well, I'm certainly no chemist, but so far in 6 months of use I can't say that we've had any trouble with food reactions. Any acidic food, if left sitting out long enough, will take off the patina, of course, but those marks are only an aesthetic issue and I think they just add to the general patina.

    Things like cut tomatoes, lemons, wine, vinegar, etc, haven't posed a problem because these things are rarely put right on the counter, and certainly not eaten/drunk after spilling on it. I don't generally put raw meat onto the countertop, and I'm pretty sure there are no chemical reactions involved with meat in any case.

    I suppose that the greenish pre-verdigris haze that can form if you leave water puddles and really don't wipe the counter off for weeks could be considered dangerous. But this is easily avoided by waxing and/or cleaning regularly, and (according to a chemist friend) is less toxic to human health than the ammonia or chloride sitting under the average American sink in the form of cleaning fluids.

    As far as I've researched the issue, the most scary copper-reactive substances are scary in and of themselves before the copper even gets involved. Nitric or sulphuric acid, for instance, would both result in dangerous reactions with copper - but they don't occur in any concentration naturally and I doubt I'll be lugging beakers of 'em home.

    Again, I'm no chemist and bow to any experts, but we're not experiencing any worries about the safety of our counters.

  • pjb999
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    That's good to know. If I was to diy anything when I redo my kitchen, it'd probably be stainless counters just because of how the house is, but in another place, I'd definitely consider copper. Never thought of it til I saw this thread. Makes a lot of sense, easy to work.

  • blondie_2009
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Help! Is it possible to install copper over 8x8 ceramic tiles? The current tiles are set inside a 3/4" x 2" solid oak edging, which I plan to stain walnut or paint cream. This would eliminate the edging problem. I'll remove the edging, fold down ample copper, then reinstall the oak edging. The grout lines are 3/8" wide. I'll need to level that with what??? Someone please reply with your thoughts. Thank you.

  • russellrobertson
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Blondie,
    If you search this page for "leveling", it should direct you to a post made by AliceinWonderland__ID. She gives an excellent step by step tutorial of her process, which included using a cement based leveling compound to cover her screw heads and fill any voids in the plywood. HOWEVER, I do not know if that material can be used over ceramic tiles, but it may be a good starting point for your research.
    Good Luck,
    Russell

  • AliceHasLeftTheBuilding
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Personally, I would NOT attempt to level out a tile countertop and install copper over it. You're going to have a problem maintaining adhesion between the tile and the leveling compound. I would remove the tile, or just take the countertop off entirely and start over with a new plywood base for the copper.

  • nottoosticky
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi,
    I have been watching this forum and wanted to share our experiences...
    After reading all your very helpful hints and suggestions, my hubby and I have started to install a copper back splash in our kitchen and hope to add a copper top to our island.
    We got our beautiful copper at a metal recycling center. Many roofers use copper and these pieces were unused, perfect 3' x 10' sheets for $2 per pound ($100 for 2 sheets! what a deal)
    We paid a metal shop to cut them into panel and bend the edges 1/4" ($65) and glued then to 1/4" plywood. That's where we are - so far, we should be putting them up soon...will post photos when finished

  • diana_lynn
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    freedee,

    You mentioned that you shaped your copper counter-top around a bullnose edge and then put an ogee moulding on the bottom (I hope I got that correct). Exactly how did you shape the copper around the bullnose? I am considering covering my present, bullnose-edged laminate countertop with copper and couldn't figure out how to deal with that edge. And then, of course, there is the issue of what to do at the end of the counter, where I'll have an outside corner that is bullnosed on the front, and completely square/flat on the side. Can't gift-wrap the corner because the front edge is bullnosed.

    Others of you were wondering about sanding down a bullnose edge to make it a 90 degree angle. Anyone try it? Wondering if that might be a good option. And did copper-over-laminate people distress the surface of the laminate or just glue it right on?

    SOOOO glad I found this thread! Have very little $$ and would really like to make the kitchen pop. Think this might be just the ticket!

    Diana Lynn

  • romper
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Thanks to everyone who has contributed to this amazing thread. It keeps going and going...
    I'm getting ready to install my countertop next week (waiting on the TC-20)and a contractor friend of mine said something that made me think... Has anyone had any issue with the patina from the copper rubbing off on people or their clothes? We plan on puting this on a raised breakfast bar that people will lean against. Thanks for the info. I should have pictures to share in a bout a week or so.

  • russellrobertson
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Romper,
    I installed a 4'x 8' copper counter/breakfast bar in July/August. We did not seal the copper, as we wanted it to patina. I am finding that if I wipe off the counter regularly, typically with soapy water when I do dishes, the patina does not rub off onto clothes or people. However, if the counter goes a while without being cleaned, the patina does rub off onto people/clothes. For instance, I just got back from a week vacation and the counter had developed a bit of patina that would rub off onto clothes. I am not sure what others have experienced. I hope this helps.
    Russell

  • romper
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    My husband and I just finished our copper countertops on Saturday thanks to all of the contributors on this thread. We basically followed the step by step instructions laid out by circus peanut and alice in wonderland with a few tweaks and findings of our own. Below are the steps we took for our results.
    Our copper area is the breakfast bar area and was part of an entire kitchen renovation. This is our "before anything happened picture"


    We removed the walls that are in this picture and then built a pony wall that is 10 long. We then installed cabinets that ran perpendicular from the end of that pony wall which are 6 long. Due to the size/shape of this copper countertop we knew we were going to have to do all of the routing/trimming/filing work inside. Thank you Alice and Circuspeanut for warning us about the mess. We put up plastic and tarps to minimize the clean-up.
    We started with installing corbels and ¾" playwood (screwing it in place on the pony wall and on top of the cabinets). This is my husband, Eric, screwing down the plywood.

    We then used heavy duty construction adhesive to glue the ½" fiberboard on top of the plywood and clamped it over night. We actually purchased ¾" fiberboard, but I found out as we were getting ready to install that I had ordered the incorrect copper bus bar. I ordered ¼" thick x 1 ¼" wide (instead of 1 ½" wide)from www.alaskancopper.com so we ran out and got the ½" fiberboard instead. We used 22 gauge copper sheets that came in 10 x 24" lengths for the top of the bar. The bus bar was 12 lengths.
    Since we didnt cut the plywood and fiberboard at the same time there was a few differences in width so we used a belt sander to sand down the differences and get a smooth finish. We could have used a router, but honestly didnt even think about it.
    To miter the bus bar we used a compound miter saw. I thought we had purchased a steel/technical blade, but we hadnt and we were up against a deadline So, we went for a test cut with the huge toothed/wood blade and it did pretty well. I wore gloves/long sleeves/hat/glasses and hid behind a board as I cut the bar those hot little metal shavings hurt when they make skin contact. We then ran into another issue. Since we were putting bus bar on both sides of the counter we had a hard time holding a 10 length with a 2 x 4 on both sides while clamping in place We had to call in the reinforcements (my wonderful parents) at 9:00 Friday night to get some help holding everything. Eric screwed some blocks of wood onto the bottom of the counterbase that stuck out like ears and helped to hold the weight of the copper bar and 2 x 4s in place while we secured the clamps. We used TC-20 adhesive to hold copper on. We purchased this thru veneersupplies.com. We spread the TC-20 onto the bar with our fingers to ensure full coverage and then clamped the bars and 2 x 4 (to avoid denting) onto the sides of the counter and let sit for 75 minutes. We would have had it sit overnight, but like I said, we were against a time line (family birthday party at our place on Saturday afternoon) and I didnt purchase the TC-20 early enough I thought I could get it at the local hardware store - nope.
    So after the 75 minutes we unclamped the bars and everything looked like it was very secure so we cut down our copper sheets to about ½" overhang on both sides. We cut the copper with a jigsaw that had a metal blade it left a rough edge, but we hoped it would all smooth out later with the router.
    By the way we did prepare the copper as instructed on the TC-20 rubbing it with steel wool and then using acetone to clean it up.
    We then put the TC-20 on the fiberboard and spread it around with a paint pad. We lifted the copper into place and set it down sliding it into position. We had about 10 to 15 seconds of easy sliding before it started to grab. We then rolled it all down with a j-roller and put 2 x 4s down on the edges and clamped in place over night.
    The next morning (day of party T-8 hours to finish copper bar, clean up house and get ready. Remember, this was all part of a major kitchen reno that had lasted 3 months and we were in the final 8 hours of it).
    We woke up and started working immediately took the clamps off of the counter. We could see there were some gaps in the miters and low spots of where the bar met the top counter piece. We used Just for copper and "smooshed" it into the crevices (using Alices technical term) but very accurate. Heres a picture of our worst spot due to difficult clamping issues:

    The night before I made a sample piece of counter with some bar and copper scraps. I HIGHLY recommend this step if you are not comfortable using a router (which we werent). We used this sample to try different bits on the router and get a feel for it before hitting our actual countertop. We ended up using a ¼" edging router bit.
    Due to the warning of scraps flying I held a shop vac hose to the bottom of the router as Eric cut along. Not sure if it really helped, but it may have been worse who knows. We did find out that if you leave a larger overlap of material it makes less of a mess because it cuts it off in a continuous strip rather than little tiny shards pictured here:

    We then filed /sanded the edges down.

    We used an orbital sander for the top of the bar with 320 grit sand paper to make little circular marks. Pictures down show it well.
    We finished up at 1:30 (30 minutes before deadline) nothing like cutting it close on a 3 month project. Here are the final pics.




    If we can do this anyone can. And yes, well let it patina we LOVE it. Already have ring marks from the party.

  • busybme
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Romper, your bar turned out BEAUTIFULLY!! You guys did a great job...congratulations!!

    Sandy

  • nottoosticky
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wow, that bar is beautiful!

    We finished our copper backsplash and it turned out great. We didn't want to let the copper age on it's own, the glow was a little much, so I did the patina myself.


    The slides are in no particular order, but you can see the cut panels, covered with sticky plastic for protection, we used a 3M spray adhesive to glue the copper to a 1/4 plywood backer. Used a fine grit steel wool to clean and begin the patina process. Hubby had to cut holes for the electrical outlets and in they went.
    We also put a couple of panels in the cabinet doors. The kitchen isn't quite finished yet, still some upper shelves to go and the new island installed. We had thought copper too, but now I think it might be a bit much. What do you all think?

  • nottoosticky
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Here are the photos, since the slideshow I tried to add, didn't work:

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

    From copper kitchen

  • romper
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    nottoosticky,
    The backsplash looks great! I love the patina it has. I'd personally go for it on the island, but that's just me. Our bar area is our favorite place in the house - everyone raves about the copper when they come over so I wouldn't hesitate to do it. It might be a little much to have copper counter tops, island and backsplash, but if your countertops aren't copper then there is enough diversity. Make sure to post your finished pics up when you're done. Good Job!

  • Circus Peanut
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wow, romper and nottoosticky! What gorgeous work you've both done. I'm impressed, and very happy to welcome you to the growing ranks of the cupraholic.

    (And our screen names amuse me, because this is how we've achieved internet immortality -- this thread is the first Google hit when you search for "copper countertops".)

    Nottoosticky, that patina is stunning! I say go for the copper island, too, but then again I'm biased. Aren't these counters total objects of fascination? Sometimes I just stand in the kitchen and run my hand over them and go mmmmmm.

    Here's a quick close-up shot of mine, after patinating naturally for about 9 months now:
    {{gwi:1997090}}

    Enjoy!

  • shawneeh_yahoo_com
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Is the copper sheeting you all have used the same as roofing sheeting?? Those are just beautiful!

  • Emestas_msn_com
    9 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I don't think I saw any mention about the antimicrobial properties of copper. This is especially useful in the kitchen. It kills ecoli and many other bugs in a couple of hours. It lives for weeks on stainless. Copper and Brass Sales sells it. I think it looks great without any finish. You can use copper bar with full round edges on the ends so you don't have too many sharp edges.

  • judyohso_hotmail_com
    9 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Here are some photos of the copper bar top and the countertop. Both were done using Enchantment copper sheets from www.colorcopper.com

    The copper was adhered using standard contact cement. Next a base coat of lacquer was sprayed to seal the copper surface. Lastly, a self-level epoxy was poured giving it a very durable surface. The photos really do not do this justice as the copper just "pops" with color and brilliance!

  • realtater_gmail_com
    9 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Judy;

    Gorgeous bar top - how did you handle the epoxy over the edges?

  • domaintransfer_hotmail_com
    9 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    For the epoxy, we put down plastic and then let the epoxy pour over the edge. Only a small amount goes over since the epoxy is thick. Then we just took a paint brush to the edges and then used the heat gun to dissipate the brush strokes. very easy process overall. Everyone the comes over just loves it. Definitely a talking piece.

  • jenellexi_aol_com
    9 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    alice in wonderland, i love your kitchen, what color are your walls? is that a glaze over paint? Thanks

  • mypelhamhouse
    4 years ago

    Can you put copper over existing formica counter top with contact cement, will it bond ?

  • Dan Witting
    4 years ago

    I see some people did epoxy over lacquer. Any recommendations for the type of epoxy (brand/source?)

  • Sarah NLucas
    4 years ago

    How do you touch it without leaving marks all over it? I have copper trim and one day with the kids and I see hand prints left all over it and impossible to rub out.

  • AliceHasLeftTheBuilding
    4 years ago

    The beauty of copper is that it changes every day from use. If you don't like that, copper is likely not a good fit for you. It is possible to polish it and than wax it, but you would be waxing or sealing it all the time - doesn't seem worth it to me.

  • Kevin Wilson
    4 years ago

    Coating copper will block it's bacteria fighting properties. For me, that is the appeal. Copper-alloy touch surfaces have natural properties that destroy a wide range of microorganisms (e.g., E. coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus, Clostridium difficile, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and fungi).[105] Some 355 copper alloys[clarification needed] were proven to kill more than 99.9% of disease-causing bacteria within just two hours when cleaned regularly