anne_mcneil57

Hume's Blush Tea-Scented China

Does anyone grow this supposedly lost and then found rose? I recently got a band from Burlington but can't tell anything yet. I found these roses in an old Portuguese Cemetery in the SF Bay Area and wonder if they could be related. I have shared them before but no one knew anything.

Found Roses · More Info
Here's Redoute's version of Hume's rose

Here are my found roses. Do they remind you of any rose you have or have seen? I'm just wondering if Hume's Blush made it to the US way back when.

Found Roses · More Info

Found Roses · More Info

Comments (21)

  • jerijen
    4 years ago

    Hume's Blush probably did, but no one has yet found it -- or at least, not verified. Your rose certainly looks similar.
    I'd love to show these to Jill Perry (of the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden) and Fred Boutin.

    Anne Zone 7a Northern CA thanked jerijen
  • AquaEyes 7a NJ
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Be aware that some places selling a rose as 'Hume's Blush' are actually giving this name to "Bermuda Spice", which is a found-rose that many feel may be the original, or perhaps a seedling of it. I don't know if that's what Burlington carries under the name, or if it's something else. There are some other purported contenders elsewhere in the world, and you can compare photos by looking at the HMF pages below:

    Agnes Smith
    Bermuda Spice
    Hume's Blush
    Hume's Blush Tea-Scented China

    One problem, however, is that the photos in both Hume's files aren't all of the same plant. Any originating in the UK may very well be "Bermuda Spice", since a few rose authors claimed that the original Hume's was rediscovered in Bermuda, and so "Bermuda Spice" is likely being sold as the original over there.

    Also, back in the days when the original was imported, seedlings that were similar enough to the original were often sold as such. So any foundlings discovered which resemble descriptions of the original may be better classed as belonging to a "Hume's Blush-type".

    And finally, there were several other pre-Bourbon and pre-Noisette Tea-Scented Chinas that are considered extinct which these foundlings may actually be. One which comes to mind is 'Caroline'. These types seem to have been passed over after Bourbon and Noisette blood gave rise to the more robust and brighter-colored Teas which came later. In warmer areas of the world, these early ones may still carry on as foundlings whose original names have been lost.

    In any case, I think your foundling is very interesting, and I'd love to see more pics as the plant develops. BTW, does it have any scent? My "Bermuda Spice" smells to me like fresh cut grapefruit.

    :-)

    ~Christopher

  • ingrid_vc so. CA zone 9
    4 years ago

    I found my "Spice" to smell somewhat peppery, but I do not have a good "nose". I no longer have it (drought) but if I'd known about the grapefruit smell I would have checked it out for that. A wonderful rose if you can give it enough moisture, which I now probably could with the drip system, but a new "La France" has already taken its place which handles the heat better than Spice ever did. Sorry to have gotten off-topic.

  • Anne Zone 7a Northern CA
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    I will go back to the cemetery in Spring and take more pictures and a cutting or two if I'm with my former boss, whose relatives are buried there. I will also grow what Burling sent me and see if they are similar. I looked at Spice in TX and ordered one for spring, these roses are different. It really is a beautiful rose, a color unlike any I've seen since. I'll keep you posted as to what I find.

  • AquaEyes 7a NJ
    4 years ago

    If you think any is different from "Bermuda Spice", please keep us informed. I really like the pale-colored Teas, and wouldn't mind adding a few more as pot-pets.

    :-)

    ~Christopher

  • Poorbutroserich Susan Nashville
    4 years ago

    Your foundling is a beauty!

    Susan

    Anne Zone 7a Northern CA thanked Poorbutroserich Susan Nashville
  • jill_perry_gw
    4 years ago

    At the Heritage we have one candidate for Hume's Blush. It was found about 40 years ago, (possibly where you found your plant) and given to Joyce Demits. I got it from her 13 years ago, which is good because her plant died, and the person who found it doesn't remember it. I'd love to see pictures of the foliage on the one you found.

    Jill

    Anne Zone 7a Northern CA thanked jill_perry_gw
  • Anne Zone 7a Northern CA
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    I will go visit the rose next time I am in the vicinity and take photos. I saw "Spice" in bloom in TX and this rose is different. I also have a Spice on order from ARE. I will get cuttings if I can from this rose, as the cemetery it is not cared for. Relatives come occasionally and my former boss had the field personnel clean it up one year when work was slow. I think the city does maintenance of the exterior fence.

  • jill_perry_gw
    4 years ago

    We have Spice at the Heritage, and I agree, it's not Hume's Blush, and is different from the Hume's Blush Candidate we have.

  • Anne Zone 7a Northern CA
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Well I went back and got some cuttings and the foliage reminds me very much of the Lady Banksia roses but the flower is not like them at all. I left my phone in Texas but will have it to take pictures in a day or two. There are brown thorns on the older canes. I unfortunately have prepared them all for rooting with only a couple of leaves on top but the good news is, I shall have plenty to share if it is a different rose. The location where I found this rose, is about 50 miles from San Jose. I wonder if this is where the Heritage rose was found. Jill Perry, do you know? It does have a scent, but not the same as the Spice scent. There weren't any roses blooming on it yet in the cemetery so I will try to get back there when there are. Hopefully my cuttings will take. The foliage on my Spice bush is more rounded and a thinner substance than the leaves of this rose.


  • hartwoodroses
    4 years ago

    Your foundling rose is fascinating and beautiful! With these foundlings, there may never be a true ID associated with it, though it is similar to 'this' or 'that' and the thought of putting a true cultivar name on it is tempting. Unless this is the same plant that produced the cuttings that now grow in San Jose, sounds to me like you are at liberty to give it a study name.

    When you go back to the cemetery, be sure to take your camera with you. Photos of the rose and nearest grave markers (if there are any) are an important part of documenting your find.

    Sending good vibes your way hoping that your cuttings take root.


  • Anne Zone 7a Northern CA
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    Here are a couple pictures of the foliage:

    It is slightly shiny and thick, lighter on the back.

  • jill_perry_gw
    4 years ago

    OK, now that I've seen the foliage, I can make several comments;

    1. It's not Hume's. Your's has 7 leaflets, Hume's has 5.

    2. It's not the candidate for Hume's that we have at the Heritage.

    3. I'm not sure it's a purely Tea rose. In Teas (not including the early Chinese imports which didn't have further influence from Chinas, Damasks and R. moschata) the terminal leaflet is bigger than the others. The lowest pair of leaflets is smaller than the others, and tilt towards the stem, rather than straight out likr the other pair or pairs.

    4. The color shows definite Tea or China influence in at least one parent.

    If you get back to the cemetery, some more info could help- size of the plant, dates on nearest graves. Give it a study name- we usually name them for the grave they are on, or the nearest in not actually on one. And try to grow one for the Heritage.

    Anne Zone 7a Northern CA thanked jill_perry_gw
  • Anne Zone 7a Northern CA
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    Thank you Jill. I appreciate the information you have provided. This is a fairly large arching shrub about 6' tall and 8' across supported by the 2 nearby headstones which are large. I have many trying to root and will certainly get one to you when well established along with the all information. I will also take pictures of the plant and headstones for you.

  • jerijen
    4 years ago

    Do you think it is remontant?

  • jill_perry_gw
    4 years ago

    I can't see in your photos if the stipules are fringed, but if they are, I would look into Barbier's ramblers. They were mainly crosses with Tea roses, to get the largish tea-like flowers and a large plant. I have Alberic Barbier, which is a "once bloomer' that almost always has a couple blooms on it. His mainly had wichurana, which gives shiny leaves, and the fringed stipules, if it has them, indicate multiflora, so Walsh's ramblers may be more like it. Anyway, I suspect a rambler of some sort, with a tea for one parent. Good luck with starting a few plants!


  • bellegallica9a
    last month

    Does anyone know if Burlington's Hume's Blush and the Jill Perry/Heritage one are the same?

  • yenluu8
    last month

    I am wondering the same.

  • bellegallica9a
    last month

    I grew the one from Burling for a little while before gifting it to a friend. Burling's is definitely not the same as Spice. The stems on that Hume's would grow super straight, a little on the long side, and upright at first, but then just before the flowers opened, they would do a 180 and hang completely down. Really strange. Also, the flowers didn't have very much scent to my nose while Spice smells very strong to me. I'd like to try the Jill Perry one if it's not the same as Burling's.

  • bellegallica9a
    last month

    Don't know if anyone is interested, but Rose Petals had their Jill Perry one available recently, and I bought one. It arrived yesterday. At first look, it does NOT seem to be the same as Burling's, but it will have to bloom before I might be able to tell for sure.