0
Your shopping cart is empty.

Adura Max vs. COREtec

WeShipFloors
October 28, 2016
last modified: December 17, 2018

I just spent a few days at the Mannington Adura manufacturing facility 50 miles east of Atlanta Georgia. As I have stated previously, I feel the Adura Max product is superior when compared head to head with other products, including COREtec. After seeing their data, I am more certain of it than ever. Below is what I learned on my trip:

Scratch Resistance:
Adura Max product has an aluminum oxide finish. They are the only company out there who can have this finish on EVP because they hold the patient on the process. When you're talking scratch resistance, Adura Max is going to win hands down compared to any other product on the market - including Coretec. Rating scratch resistance on a scale of 1 to 10, Adura Max comes in at a 9 where standard UV cured urethane (COREtec) comes in at a 4 or below.

Core:
Adura Max HydroLoc core is a higher density core than others on the market. This mean it is less susceptible to dings and dents.

Locking System:
Adura Max premium locking system is waterproof just like the flooring itself. So when things spill, the moisture will not wick down to your sub-floor.

Sound:
Adura Max has a premium ultraquiet closed cell polyethylene attached pad which gives it a IIC Sound rating of 72, where the cork back has a IIC rating of 65. This is critical in multi-tenant applications where sound abatement is critical.

Pricing:
Even with all the solid advantages of the Adura Max listed above, we can sell it to you at the same price of Coretec.

I strive to provide our customers with the very best flooring product available at the very best price possible. Again, I am highly impressed by the Mannington Adura Max product. There isn't anything else on the market that holds a candle to it in my opinion.

Alan Ward
CEO
WeShipFloors.com

Comments (1.9K)

  • gotoran

    Anybody know if there's a way to make a right turn from one hallway into another using a 45 degree joint that's flush with the rest of the floor...ie...like you could do with a real wood floor?

  • Nancy

    I don’t think with the click mechanism that it is possible without a transition.


    However, since you can use carpet tape to repair individual planks and fix in a new plank, maybe you could do the same to make a right angle transition? It would take some precision cutting though.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Nancy,


    Who specified using carpet tape? This would secure the floor down.


    It you have to attach a plank without clicking it (like to slide under a door jamb), we sell an adhesive so you can glue the two planks together.


    You can also use the adhesive to do a board replacement in the middle of a room. No, you do not have to unclick the whole job. Say you have one board that the click is broken and you did not find out until the job was finished. This is how you would fix it:

    • You saw the broken board down the middle the long way
    • Trim the lower lock off the two sides that have it
    • Apply a tiny bead of adhesive on the locking mechanism of the perimeter boards
    • Drop in the new modified lock board
    • Weight it down until the glue dries

    The above board replacement procedure can be used with any SPC or WPC floor out there.


    This "may" work on turning the boards 45°, but I will have to test it out. The locks on the ends are made entirely different than the locks on the sides. PLUS, you would then be starting with every single board 5 feet long which would look goofy. A T mold may just have to be used. :(


    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    CherylBirth,

    You can click the floor in running backwards, it will take a little trial and error to do so.

    This is what I would do in your situation.

    • Measure from the wall on bottom left in the kitchen up the wall until you are into the door that passes into the foyer. Figure the face width of a single plank of floor and measure out to break on one of these units. (i.e. a plank is 7" wide, you would go 7, 14, 21, 28" etc.) Take into consideration dealing with the undercut of your door jamb. It would be nice for the click to just tuck underneath with no cutting of the board needed. Determine the best measurement and make a mark on the subfloor on the left wall.
    • Take this same measurement and measure on the opposite wall on the right by the front door and make a mark on the subfloor.
    • Chalk a line on the floor between the two marks and use this as your reference line. (through the foyer door) This line will be your reference that you measure off of to lay the kitchen, the foyer and the closet.
    • Measure from the chalk line back to the lower wall, but stop 3 plank widths back.
    • Transfer this measurement into all three room, making a mark on the right and left of each room and then chalk a line. This is your 3 board back starting reference.
    • Lay 3 rows in each room making sure after they are installed the third row breaks perfectly on the 3 row back line you chalked. (You should be able to slide the locked boards around as a unit if these are not huge rooms) Do this in all three rooms.
    • Bring your 3 rooms of installed floor out at the same time. When you get into the doorway, you should be able install right through it making the three rooms tie in perfectly.

    Sorry, I get long winded. I should do a video.

    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Some of you may wonder why you should use a chalk line as the reference and just not the wall down the lower side itself. The issue is houses usually aren't square, but the flooring is.

    Also above, when you chalk the line through the doorway. It is not a bad idea to check the measurement from this line up to the wall into the living room to check it's squareness to the project. The primary reference line through the doorway can be fudged up or down on one side or the other to make how the floor breaks on the living room wall look right. Believe it or not, a person can easily pick up the boards being off by a 1/2" squareness from one end of the wall to the other.

    The walls you should worry about are INTERIOR long walls, not the exterior walls. People look down interior walls, but rarely do they look down exterior walls. The longer the wall, the more variation in plank width can be picked up.

    What we are trying to do is make it so when you walk into the front door and look through the foyer door into the kitchen, the whole job is straight as an arrow. We also want this long run to have the planks ripped the same width all the way down the wall going up against the living room wall, which makes all the rips the same width inside the living room itself on that wall.

    Depending on how your foyer door breaks with the flooring plank width, the start of the project may need to be with ripped boards along the lower wall as well. We don't care what the lower wall looks like, we want the doorway to look good (and be easy too)

    Like I stated above, most houses are out of square to a degree. The non-square can be compensated for by using a chalk line as a reference point instead of the walls themselves.

    After this, you'll walk into your friend's homes and be critiquing their flooring installations....lol

    Alan

    I've not been posting in here enough, making up for it :-)

  • cherylbirth

    Alan, a video would be great! I'm very visual and having a hard time picturing what you're explaining above. Nancy, that's exactly what I meant. :)

  • suseyb

    This video helped us to plan the layout for our floor, to ensure that we managed our long hallway well, and also to ensure that we had wide enough strips of plank on both sides of the hallway. Where to start vinyl plank


    And Alan, you rock! Thanks for your sage advice!

  • Nancy

    Sorry my bad. I said carpet tape but you’re right, that wouldn’t work.


    US Floors has posted on the big coretec thread how to cut out a plank and replace it if needed. It uses some sort of tape underneath to hold the new plank, as you have to cut off some of the locking mechansims to jigger the new plank in.

  • Nancy

    Sorry my bad. I said carpet tape but you’re right, that wouldn’t work.


    US Floors has posted on the big coretec thread how to cut out a plank and replace it if needed. It uses some sort of tape underneath to hold the new plank, as you have to cut off some of the locking mechansims to jigger the new plank in.

  • suseyb

    Are y'all putting rug pads under your rugs or purchasing rugs that have no latex in them? If you are purchasing latex free rugs, where are you finding them?

  • Chessie

    ". It uses some sort of tape underneath to hold the new plank, as you have to cut off some of the locking mechansims to jigger the new plank in."


    That's the issue I have with these locking floating floors. With a glue down, you just heat it, pull it up, and put a new one down. Easy. Having to cut off a part of the plank...that just can't be a good thing. I would worry about how long that will hold up.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Only the bottom of the lock is cut off. The repair the way we recommend doing it is permanent. I will do a video.


    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    We are now offering a 30 Day Money Back Guarantee on SUPERcore flooring. See website for details. - Alan



  • Joshua Kim

    so i think i'm pretty sold on the supercore product. found it while looking up articles on LVP and found one on Mannington. My search for Mannington brought me to Houzz and WeShipFloors. Then this thread and Supercore!


    I noticed that on the KryptoniteFloors.com there are less options than on WeShipFloors.com and there is a SuperCore Enhanced product.


    Can you talk about the Enahanced line?

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Kryptonite is the name we list all "house brand" vinyl floors that we carry on WeShipFloors.com. When we started making SUPERcore we started it under that name but it quickly evolved into it's own line of product.


    Enhanced is part of the "Originals" line. It's the products with painted beveled edges.


    Alan

  • M W

    @suseyb- we found felt rug pads at RugPadUSA

  • suseyb

    Thanks M W! I have some rugs ordered, and will see how it goes. I'm not sure how the felt pads will do in an entryway, so I ordered a ruggable for that area. I mopped our kitchen floor again today, and I just love it! It's super easy to mop. Once we finish the trim, I can take more pics of the other areas of the house that have the Supercore.

  • nattypj

    We are having our home renovation and have to change all the floor. I have been checking and looking for the right floor for over 4 months and still could not come to the conclusion. And we are going to have to install the floor in about 3 weeks. We want something that will be water resistant since we want to put it in the kitchen as well so we want something that we can run through out the house except the bathrooms. Therefore, I am going toward rigid vinyl plank. Of course now I am getting more into SPC/RVP over WPC since it is a new comer with stronger core of the stone composition. I have been testing all the floor samples with about all aspects of what the great floor should be scratch, stain, dent, water resistant. I also test on waterproof laminate from Pergo and Cali Vinyl. The only thing I have not tested is the coloring fading issue on the SPC. Which would be one more part that I am getting to be nervous using rigid vinyl plank since we have skylights all over the house. But then when I talked to some floor store they said even hardwood floor fade too? Could you please let me know the comparison of the Supercore VS Flooret Modin, Lifeproof SPC, Gemcore SPC, Republic, Kardean Korlock, and Smartcore Pro. Is Supercore better than any of these brands and if so why? Also does Supercore have wider plan than 7 inches? I see that now people are going more toward 9 inches by 72 inches plank. I am going to try to order Supercore sample today. I feel like Supercore might be a winner from reading through this long thread (though I did skip here and there). Thanks.

  • suseyb

    Supecore's 7" plank is great. It doesn't come in a wider width right now. We have not had any issues with our Supercore installed in our home. It is in our kitchen, master bath, and living areas. Supercore is a true SPC, unlike some of those other products. What makes it a better product is first and foremost, the customer service. Secondly, it is a not several parts sandwiched together (which could cause some of it to fail), but it is one solid piece.


    I've looked at almost every floor that you mentioned above, and chose Supercore. When you get your samples, you will see why.

  • gotoran

    Susey, all SPC consists of sandwiched layers; an SPC layer, then a print layer (usually vinyl), a wear layer, and as is most often the case now, a bottom cushion layer. Not sure if there's new technology that allows printing directly to SPC, but Alan can chime in on that. If so, it would eliminate the vinyl layer. But don't forget that the SPC layer itself consists of vinyl + crushed stone.

  • suseyb

    Here is what Alan said on August 9th in this thread, "Some SPC is produced via ABA construction with vinyl on top and bottom. I refuse to produce it this way - I want vinyl and glue out of the equation. Several manufacturers in China (I take their advice over US manufacturers who do not make this stuff) have told me they do not know how the sandwich ABA SPC will hold up over time. If I thought sandwich construction was the better way to produce this product, I would be making it that way. I do not."

  • gotoran

    I believe you may be slightly misinterpreting what Alan said. Unless there is some kind of new-fangled technology that allows printing directly to SPC, the print goes on top of a very thin layer of vinyl. It's called the "print layer". Yes, the core is all SPC, but unless I'm wrong, it is topped with the print layer, then the wear layer. And of course, there's his bottom cushion layer. Of course, it's all a sandwich of sorts, just not the same exact sandwich as some other manufacturers. Trust me, it doesn't just consist of a cushion layer, then solid SPC.


    As for the plank width, if you're filling a large boxy room, you can make it look smaller with narrower planks or larger with wider planks. The problem comes with hallways, especially narrow hallways, which looks silly with large 9" planks, not to mention the logistical challenges. Planks should be suited to the area in which they're placed.

  • suseyb

    I also remember Alan saying that there was no vinyl in the floor, but I can't remember when that was. And yes, I understand that there are layers, but the inside isn't a sandwich, which is what makes Supercore a more stable product. I'm no flooring expert, of course, just read a lot.

  • suseyb

    I found it. I'm sorry for the confusion. And yes, it's a sandwich of sorts. Thanks for explaining it better than I did. :)

    "SUPERcore is made via the continuous roll hot extrusion process. Once the core is extruded, it immediately has the film, wear layer and embossing hot rolled together. This all happens at a very high temperature. There is no adhesive used in the process - the temperature bonds everything together and makes it into a solid unit."


  • nattypj

    Thanks for the info. What is the material used on the 20 mil wear layer of Supercore? I know that Lifeproof rigid plank has ceramic bead on the wear layer for scratch resistant and some other brand like Gemcore use quartz on their wear layer to enhance the durability. With Flooret Modin, their selling point is 40 mil wear layer but it is just a clear layer of PVC. So it is a bit more plasticky look. By the way I have big hall way so 9 inches wide plank is not a problem :). But that does not mean I would not consider 7 inches ones as long as it is the right product with the right color and texture :).


  • christyz78

    Are rugs with latex not supposed to be put on SuperCore?

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    The wear layer is a high density PVC. SUPERcore has a 12 mil, 20 mil and now a 30 mil versions. It has ceramic beads in the UV cured Urethane anti-scratch coating.

    When I refer to "vinyl" I am talking about the low density product that LVP is made out of. This product expands and contracts drastically due to temperature. They are all plastics when it comes right down to it. The difference between them is how they are produced and what other raw materials are added.

    There are several ways to make SPC. Most name brands out there use the ABA method where a thin SPC core is sandwiched between two vinyl layers. One is a top layer and the other is a bottom balance layer. These are then all glued and pressed together. This construction is similar to how WPC is made. So most WPC factories elect to make the product in this manner.

    SUPERcore is made via a continuous hot roll process. All of our components fuse into a single unit at the end of the extrusion line via heat and not glue. The mix is 80% limestone dust and 20% PVC in our SPC core. There is decorative film layer on top of this then the wear layer. All of the data we have says this is the best way to produce SPC.


    By the way, we have a sale on SUPERcore until Tuesday.


    Alan

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    christyz78 ,


    They have to be safe to used on LVT/WPC/SPC

  • cherylbirth

    Alan, do you have an email address I could get? I have a specific question about what we can or can't do when we do our kitchen, which will be soon.

  • Sharon Perkins

    I have Coretec Norwegian Maple in the foyer, dining room and kitchen and AudUSA Seaport in the sunroom. The coretec floor seems more solid and less “clicky

    .” It also seems somewhat warmer to me.

  • Sharon Perkins

    Norwegian Maple


  • Sharon Perkins

    Acura Seaport


  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    I can guarantee you it isn't more solid. It's a little hard to compare it to SUPERcore since you've never ordered a sample...






  • cherylbirth

    Alan, got it and thank you!


  • suseyb

    We had some friends over last night, and they remarked on how solid the Supercore felt under foot. I didn't even prompt them. :)

  • Elaine F

    We just got back from our cabin in Flagstaff, AZ. I wanted to let everyone know that our Supercore is holding up well to the freezing temperatures. No issues with expansion/contraction and being waterproof is so wonderful with all the snow. I love the flooring and was concerned with it being too cold after ripping out carpet and laminate. I was able to walk on it barefoot with no problem! It's much warmer than laminate and doesn't have the clicky sound when walking on it. We are able to control our thermostat remotely so we turn the heat on before we arrive to heat our place up. We still have trim work to complete but it may take a while since we don't go up as often in the winter months.

  • gotoran

    How's about this one....

    Alan, if I have a kitchen island with seating, do I have to put an expansion gap around the entire perimeter of the island, including inside the seating area? If so, I assume I'd then have to cover the entire gap with a base moulding shoe, yes? I'll be having a beautiful quartz waterfall island countertop, which would of course normally sit directly atop a regular wood floor, but since SPC can't hold that kind of cabinet/quartz weight, I'm trying to figure out if where the quartz meets the floor I'll need to cover an expansion gap. What did you say it was....1/8"?

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Gotoran,

    A regular wood floor would be nailed down. A floating floor needs to float. You would need to have an expansion around the island. I would do a 1/4" to be safe.

    Alan

  • gotoran

    Any creative ideas on how to hide that 1/4" gap? If the quartz goes all the way down to the floor, are you suggesting I glue a quarter round to the bottom of the quartz? You really can't nail the quarter round into quartz, and I'm not sure how a glue job would hold up to foot traffic.

  • Rory, SW, PA

    Alan or anyone who has installed Supercore,


    What underlayment, if any, did you use on top of the plywood subfloor? I know I asked this ? before but I can't find the thread. I would like to use an underlayment to both raise the subfloor level a bit and reduce the foot traffic noise.


    We are installing Supercore on the main floor of a raised ranch. The lower level has 2 bedrooms and a family room and it's noisy down there when people are walking around upstairs.

  • suseyb

    It doesn't need any because the underlayment is already attached.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    Gotoran,

    100% silicon will probably work better attaching to quartz.

  • suseyb

    Found the thread for you @Rory. Underlayment Question


  • gotoran

    Alan,


    I assume you mean using the silicone to attach the quarter round to the quartz, not using it to fill in the 1/4" gap, correct?

  • Nancy

    Gotoran,


    How about having them cut a kerf (not sure that's the right word) in the bottom edge of the waterfall quartz? Like you'd undercut a door jamb to let the floor float under, you could do the same here. Would have to be big enough to hide the raw edge of flooring AND still allow for expansion, and be cut pretty precisely to allow the floor to move (although Supercore doesn't move much) yet not leave a visible gap.



  • gotoran

    Niiiice suggestion. Thanks! Will have to look into that.

  • PRO
    WeShipFloors

    If the island is being built, you could absolutely do what Nancy is suggesting. That is what you do to trim against a fireplace for it to look the best.

    Alan

  • Chessie

    Man that is just one more reason I don't like floating floors. My island is sitting on TOP of my floor. No molding. I much prefer that look. This is an old pic, the blue tape was just while I was painting. I think molding would ruin the look of this island.

  • betnotbe

    Elaine,

    small world. I live in Flagstaff!

  • betnotbe

    Our install is almost done. All the baseboards are back on and painted. We haven't installed the moldings at supercore to carpet transitions. I haven't called about the incorrect track we have. Whoops. Too much going on. Lots of compliments on the floors and everybody wants to know what it is. I feel like it's kind of noisy, but I still like it.

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).