0
Your shopping cart is empty.
jsfam

Hydrangeas from a distance

jsfam
3 days ago

I have Annabelle’s on the (front) North side of our house that I love! Now I can put a taller type of hydrangea on my East garage side and around the corner to the South side. The bed is 7’ deep. Which variety would you choose? Height is not so much an issue bc I want a lot of coverage of the garage. What type would you use? We are in IA. We have deer that do not usually bother my annebelles but still need a hydrangea that blooms on new growth. What would you recommend?



Comments (15)

  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

    Paniculatas are a good choice and come in a wide range of forms and sizes. But I would avoid planting any hydrangeas in a full on southern exposure - too much sun.

    And I only have one panicle hydrangea (lots of macs and serratas) but the deer will routinely nip off the flowerheads on any of them unless I spray. YMMV

    jsfam thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH

    I don’t know how much farther south you are than I am but my paniculatas do just fine in all day sun. As GG 48 said, YMMV on this, so I would look around and ask at good nurseries to see how panicled hydrangeas do in full sun in your area.

    Hydrangea paniculatas vary in size by cultivar, from about 4’ in all directions to 12’ or so. They tend to be at least as wide as tall, and aren’t successfully controlled in size by pruning since they regrow quickly, so choose one that will grow to the size you want. If you want a taller one, you will want to make your bed deeper, front to back.

    jsfam thanked NHBabs z4b-5a NH
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

    Babs, they grow here too in open sun. But open sun is very different from the double whammy of full afternoon sun and any reflected sun/heat from a southern exposure foundation planting. But have no personal knowledge of how strong that could be in IA :-)

    jsfam thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • jsfam

    I was thinking about Quick Fire because it is an early bloomer; however, limelight is another I seem to keep going back to. Anyone have experience or insight on one of these?

  • nicholsworth Z6 Indianapolis

    I have and love both..yours would be prettier than mine..mine are growing in shade because I have a wooded lot..I'm still glad that I bought them..I see bigger ones with more blooms growing here in full sun..

    jsfam thanked nicholsworth Z6 Indianapolis
  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH

    Depends on the look you want. Limelight has huge densely packed, voluptuous bloom panicles that can weight enough at times that the branch ends can get pulled sideways. Late season color is more of a pale pink to tan and the bloom starts about 3 weeks after Quickfire here. There are tons of on line photos of its chartreusey cream color, but in the linked thread, there are some photos of the same hedge showing growth over time, posted by “unprofessional”.

    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/1992345/how-are-those-limelight-hedges-looking-pic#n=114

    I am partial to the lacy look of Quickfire. The lighter panicles don’t droop at all. Here it blooms from the beginning of July until frost, first white, then light peachy pink and ending the season with a deep rich pink in my garden.

    early July with Clematis Little Bas



    mid-August



    From Labor Day until frost



    Both will perform well IME, so which you choose will depend on the look and of course the size you want. Both get to something like 8’-9’ in all directions, so they need quite a bit of space. If those are too big, check out Little Lime and Little Quickfire or the smallest, Bobo.

    jsfam thanked NHBabs z4b-5a NH
  • guyground

    If you want to go with a larger cultivar Limelight or little lamb would be your easiest bet. Easy growth and very reliable blooming and performance .

    Hydrangea vanilla strawberry is large and can be beautiful , but it can fail to change color which ends up being a big Disappointment.

    Quickfire has lacier flower and is less showy.

    little lime is a dwarf limelight , so if you like limelight but don’t want it to get massive little lime is an option.

    jsfam thanked guyground
  • jalarse
    I like “Endless Summer” Hydrangeas. They will blossom on old and new growth. I have seven of them and all are doing well. Nice thing about them is you can trim to your hearts content and it does not phase them. I’m in the Pacific Northwest zone 8B.
    jsfam thanked jalarse
  • guyground

    Endless Summer probably won’t bloom in IA, or would require heavy winter protection to have a chance.

    jsfam thanked guyground
  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH

    Jalarse, you are fortunate to live in a part of the US where big leaf hydrangeas like Endless Summer do well. In much of the country, the overwintered flower buds are killed either by cold winter temperatures or late spring freezes, so the spring bloom is nonexist and the late summer bloom is iffy because the plant has had to regrow all the stems that were winter killed. I typically get about 5 flowers from mine.

    And guyground, we will have to disagree on the “less showy” aspect of Quickfire. Different, yes, but IMO far from less. Kind of like comparing Elizabeth Taylor in her prime to Emma Watson; both are beautiful but in radically different ways.

    jsfam thanked NHBabs z4b-5a NH
  • pennlake

    If the east side receives all morning sun with nothing shading it that would be a good spot for any of the Endless Summer Hydrangeas. For me Bloomstruck performs best in my dry sandy soils. Very wilt resistant.

  • Nancy R
    I would suggest you look into paniculata White Diamonds. I am in zone 5 Chicago area and have tried several different paniculatas. The one that looks the best is a White Diamonds that is getting more or less full sun. It is not next to a building so I can't comment on that.
  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH

    As guyground said above, it is unlikely that any big leaf hydrangea, whether Endless Summer or Bloomstruck or any other, will do well in IA. Bloom is likely to be unreliable in spring between cold winter temperatures and late winter or spring freezes, and if there has been much winter kill of stems, bloom may not be great on new wood. They do well in coastal area where temperature extremes are mitigated by water but tend to do less well midcontinent and in colder areas.

  • pennlake

    I live in Minnesota and am quite familar with the Endless Summer collection of hydrangeas. I think Bloomstruck is the best of the bunch and stand by my recommendation.

  • guyground

    All Macs are risky in Northern climates. Anyone considering one should be aware of this risk. One way to gauge is to look around your area. See what other people have that bloom well / don't bloom well. A lot can be gleaned merely by observation.


    Guyground Out.

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).