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humbleandkind

Dogs and Decorating Dilemmas

humbleandkind
May 15, 2019

Our family room is the perfect place for us to keep our dogs when we leave the house (it contains their beds, toys, food/water bowls) except for this one 6’ wide opening in the picture below. We have a free standing gate that worked well with our 4 year old dog but our 8 month old puppy is a canine Houdini and can get out no matter how it’s set up, so I’m looking for other ideas. Ideally I’d like something that is secure but removable or hidden since this room opens to our kitchen and main living areas. My original thought was to have matching console tables made for each side of the opening with some type of gate behind the left side that could be pulled across and secured on the right side, but the baseboard heater and depth on the right side complicates things. Both walls are 5’ wide but on the right side the heater is 50” long with 6” of wall space to its left and 4” to its right (with a depth of 14” on the far right before you hit a door to the deck (that’s never used)). A friend recommended barn doors but I’m not sure how they would work with the casing or if they fit with the style of the house (probably best described as a transitional colonial). Any thoughts are appreciated!


This is the opening and walls in question (with our little Houdini who does not want to be contained!):



This is the gate we have. I thought about attaching it to the casing somehow but I’m not sure how we could do that.



This is the far right corner that shows the depth issue:



Thanks!


Comments (54)

  • maddielee

    ??? I’d want something like this instead of gates. Would they work for you.?

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  • jojoco

    Oooohh, Maddie. That's so pretty.

    Also, not all barn doors look like they are made to keep out Mr. Ed.

    (google "paneled barn doors"

    humbleandkind thanked jojoco
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  • humbleandkind

    allison0704: I love that idea and, although we don’t have a place for it in our downstairs, we may be able to do something similar in our bedroom where the dogs’ crates are located. As you can tell from this picture, they love being close to each other and the standard sized crates get a little crowded!





    Maddielee: I love that look and they would work much better than full sized french doors. The only issue is how they would look in a room with two other full sets of Fench doors since the window pane size would be different. Hmmm .


    jojoco: good point that there are many different styles of barn doors. Since the opening is 6’ and each wall is only 5’ I’d need split doors (is that the correct search term?), but that could work. I’ll search for options - thanks!


  • pennydesign

    Attach what you have to the casing...Make sure the hinges are heavy duty and the screws long enough to work...and get a good latch :)


    It will work, it looks good, and you already own it. I would paint it white first though..


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  • humbleandkind

    pennydesign: That would be the easiest solution, I just couldn’t wrap my head around how to make it work. Might be worth a trip to our local hardware store with pictures to see if they can help me. Good idea on the white paint to make it blend in better. Thanks!

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

    You might even be able to use some kind of hinges with a removable pin, so the gates could be taken off and put away out of sight when not in use. Or simple hooks or sliding bolts might be used as well...

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  • Kool Beans

    I’m not a fan of closed crates for a variety of reasons, so I can appreciate what you are trying to do. Honestly, just the idea of crating my dog gives me claustrophobia and makes me cringe. Our dog had a crate for a few years but it was never closed. Now her safe spot is a bed. Your pups look so sweet sleeping together.

    A couple of thoughts, have you considered pocket doors? If the walls are not load bearing that might be an option. I also found pics of a pocket gate, which looks pretty cool.


    Pocket doors


    I love the idea of glass


    There larger metal gates that can be installed too, they just aren’t quite as nice looking


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  • humbleandkind

    carolb: I‘ll ask our local hardware store about those options - thanks!

    Kool Beans: I love those pocket gates! I‘m not sure if either side is load bearing but the left side contains plumbing and electrical so pocket doors/gates won’t work. But I’m saving the pocket gate idea in case we can ever use it!


    When I shared these ideas with my husband, he pointed out that this may not be a long term issue for us (the older dog was fine not being contained, but the puppy still gets into things every now and again), so he’d rather not do anything too permanent since we like the openness otherwise. However, looking at our gate I’m not sure how easy it will be to attach. It is very heavy and the hinges are not particularly strong. If you slide it across the opening it scratches the hardwood floor so you need to life it in place. But I’m sure I could find a lighter option. Thanks for all the ideas!


  • homechef59

    I work with rescue dogs and have trained my dogs for agility, obedience and therapy. The simple solution is to crate the dogs while you are away.

    Crating is not cruel. Rather, dogs who are crate trained will seek out their crates when they want peace and quiet. It will also allow you to better potty train the puppy. Your puppy won't be up to no good from boredom while you are gone. My mature dogs don't need them now. But, they needed them while in puppy stage. It will also give your mature dog a break from all the puppy madness and activity.

    Crates have the advantage of being portable. They will work in any room. We use collapsible travel crates in hotels when we travel.

    We see dogs in rescue all the time because of their puppy mischief. Crate training could have prevented the mischief.

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  • Oakley

    Speaking from experience, there's a good chance your puppy will jump up and down while you're gone and possibly damage any type barrier, especially where it's attached. And because he's a puppy, the toys will bore him and he'll go for something better to chew on, like cabinets. Or the legs to your favorite coffee table. Wait, that was my dog.

    Buy a large crate. Put food, water, toys, chew bones, blankets and stuff in there. Yes, the crying will kill you at first, but you'll be gone and can't hear him. He will get used to it. Put the crate in the room your other dog will be in.

    When your home keep the door to the crate open, maybe a snack in there, and he'll get used to it.

    Right now the dog is too young to trust with chewing all the wood in your kitchen or elsewhere.

    It hurts the parents more than it hurts the dog. ;)

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  • humbleandkind

    homechef59: Thanks for your perspective. The puppy doesn‘t really get into much mischief (she’s gotten a shoe or something left out maybe 2-3 times in the ~6 months we’ve had her, and she’s been fully potty trained for months) but she’s still a puppy so for her own safety I’m more comfortable having her contained for a while. We work with a lot of trainers during the puppy’s first year and as needed thereafter (no risk of her falling to a rescue!) and we have two crates upstairs that we use with the dogs. Technically they are portable but they are not super easy to bring up and down stairs. Our older dog definitely seeks it out from time to time when he needs some quiet. But there are still times when I’d like an option to have her contained but not crated . . . Such as when I’m making dinner and preoccupied, when we have workers in the house (getting ready for a bathroom remodel), and generally in the mornings. For example, after I drop my son off at school I run to the gym for an hour or so and the dogs really don’t like being crated after a full night of containment. And, truth be told, the bigger issue may be that I feel guilty about it.


  • Yayagal

    Your dog looks like a good size, couldn't he or she just jump over most of the barriers posted?


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  • tinam61

    Not everyone likes/wants to use crates. We never did. We used a room and a gate. She trained very easily and that was her safe spot. She has always traveled with us (without a crate). It sounds like you are doing all the right things with your puppy! Glad she's found a good home. She is a cutie!! I like the folding french doors that Maddie shared. But, like you say, you won't need something permanently. One morning my pup decided she wasn't going in "her" room. I was working and finally had to just leave her. She was fine and ever since then has had run of the house. Other than our master br closet. LOL for some reason she will root in and behind the shoes. My side has a shoe shelf and she can wiggle her way under it. We were afraid she'd get stuck! No clue why that intrigues her. We first thought maybe she had hid a bone (treat) in there but she hadn't. Weird!!

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  • pennydesign

    What about attaching some very small casters on the bottom of the outermost panel to take some of the weight off it? That way the hinges (which you should replace with heavier ones) won't be carrying all of it? Plus it will be easier to slide open.

    Something like this would be ideal:



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  • Kool Beans

    I agree with Tina, and one reason is because more times than not, people don’t understand or even care about the correct way to use them. They’re great for transporting but IMO, they shouldn’t take the place of consistent and diligent training.

    Humble, you may want to look at a simple baby gate. We used one for the stairs when Ellie was small. There are brackets so it’s removable when not in use and once the pup is trained, the brackets can come off and the wall put back to the way it was. This one can be expanded.


    https://thechangingtables.com/best-baby-gate/


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  • humbleandkind

    Thanks for all the different perspectives and ideas! I actually have mixed feeling about crates. A bit off topic, but I think where I come down, for our family, is that they are great in some situations and for some dogs for their safety, but not great when used just for my convenience or failure to properly train (if that makes sense). I also think it’s a good thing to expose them to in case they ever need to be crated at a kennel, vet, etc. We never used them with any of our dogs growing up, however, just consistent training, and every dog we had was exceptionally well behaved. But our first dog turned out to be somewhat nervous and anxious (unfortunate circumstances but he came to us at ~ 5 weeks the vet thinks), was difficult to potty train, and I think he really benefited from being in a crate (sometimes open, sometimes closed). Our puppy, on the other hand, can’t get close enough to our older dog and sometimes (not always, but mornings are a definite) seems way more stressed if separated from him in her own crate (especially when he is not also crated beside her). And our older dog has really benefited from her company but will also go to his own bed or crate if he needs alone time. So, while I appreciate the comments advocating for crates, and will use them as appropriate for us, I’d also like the option to leave them in a bigger space with food, toys and room to roam and stretch a bit. This will be especially important to me once we start our bathroom renovation. We’ve done lots of work with a trainer to get them to “go to their bed” and they’re getting really good at going there and staying there when we have someone ring the doorbell. But they’re always well behaved until they aren’t, right? And I anticipate some days, like demo day, being one long test!


    oakley: I think we cross posted . . . I am sure you’re right that crating her bothers me more than her. A larger pen area could work outside maybe, if i want to get them away from all the remodel noise with me, but we don’t really have the space downstairs.

    yayagal: they are wheaten terriers, so about 40 lbs. They are known for their jumping on people when greeting them (thus the ‘Wheaten Greetin’, which was the hardest to train against). I’ve never seen them try to jump over the gate or anything else but I’d never say never! They’d probably only be motivated to when someone comes in the house though, so we’d be here. Otherwise they seem content to just be together.

    tinam61: Thanks! It’s nice to hear other non-crate success stories!

    pennydesign: casters are a great idea - thanks!

    Kool Beans: I think we have a similar philosophy on crates. Baby gates are a great idea (slaps head!). If I recall correctly, the ones we had were much lighter and should be easier to attach than the gate we have.

  • patriceny

    To this Westie Mom, you sound like an awesome dog owner. Thank you for caring about doing this right. I've seen way too many people misuse crates and it makes me so happy to see someone putting this kind of effort into training and the dog's ultimate emotional stability and happiness.

    I love Wheatens! If Westies didn't already own my heart, Wheatens (or maybe Cairns) would be my breed of choice. :)

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  • chispa

    My 2 shepherd mixes can easily jump 6 foot barriers, so crates or a room with a door to keep them contained. The older one was actually brought back by the first family that adopted her because she kept jumping the fence around their yard. Younger one has to be crated or she would find things to entertain herself, like eating furniture, drapes, etc.

    Also if you have dogs that thieves would consider dangerous, the dogs are better off contained so that the thieves don't feel they have to poison or kill them.

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  • humbleandkind

    Patriceny: Thanks! Our neighbor has a Westie and he’s the best dog! He was a rescue and I swear you can tell how much he appreciates them taking in an older dog.

  • yeonassky

    We have a set of 4 foot high dog pen fences. We attach them to make a large pen and keep our dogs in there. Each pen is about 10 feet long.

    That's what I would do. You just put the pens in the room you plan to use and they fold up when you're not using it. You could use one of the walls as one of the barriers and that would make the pen even bigger. The pens come with strong clips to attach them to each other so there would be no possibility of a breakout.

    The older dog probably wouldn't jump over the fence and the puppy probably can't yet.

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  • Susan Davis
    You will not like this, but puppies need and want crates. Get the right size and train your puppy to the crate when you are gone and when you are at home. Everyone including your pet will Thank you for doing so. Pets are very intelligent and want nothing more than to please those they live with.
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  • humbleandkind

    Chispa: if we needed to go the fully contained room route, it would have to be a bedroom and none of those are good options for various reasons, unless we were to do the split barn door in the family room. Will have to give that some thought, especially since we view this as a short term issue. As for the dogs, they are fluff balls and not at all menacing, but who knows how they would behave if someone were to break in. Not a huge concern where we live, but anything is possible.

    yeonassky: our rooms are not big enough for such a nice indoor pen without rendering them basically uninhabitable for the human members. I love my dogs but . . . I also love my people! Your dogs are very lucky to have that setup! I was kinda hoping to get something similar with three walls and one gate. :)

  • pennydesign

    The crate discussion often finds it's way into almost any conversation about dogs....I don't see why. Humbleandkind has a crate. Unless she's lived in a cave, she knows all about them. Her decision on when and how to use it is her own. She's asking about a gate....


    OP, I was under the impression that what you had was a dog gate? Anyway, I would go with that (or another kind) because that would be easiest for me. Agreed they're not overly pretty, but hopefully it's not permanent :)

    We have 2 dogs and we don't own crates...so I get having to confine them to specific areas during certain times, but then we have smaller doorways that we can block off easily. A wide opening isn't so easy...


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  • Oakley

    I love Wheaten's! Have you noticed how they're handled when being inspected on the table during a dog show? I love it.

    FTR, I never crated my dogs, but did keep the crates in the LR. I don't work outside the home so it's been easy until we got the current dogs we have now. They each weigh about 80 lbs and when we put up a gate between the kitchen and DR, it came down almost immediately when they were puppies because they're so strong.

    With a Wheaten and the training he's had, I wouldn't worry about getting a crate. I've had dogs forever and never crated any, although I did try.

    If you end up with a gate, put him behind it while you're home and see if he tries to jump it or pushes on it before you leave him alone.

    You could also put a medium size crate (they fold easily) and keep it in the kitchen when you're gone and the gate is up.

    Good luck with your new guy!

    humbleandkind thanked Oakley
  • maddielee

    Just be careful what type of gate you get. The picture below is from the Internet, my brother once came home to his tiny Yorkie half way over his gate. He had no idea how long she had been hanging there. Luckily she wasn’t hurt.

    Internet photo example:



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  • humbleandkind

    Susan Davis: I don’t dislike your comment at all! i‘ve heard and respect all sides of this debate. In fact, like I and others have mentioned above, I have two crates and use them, as I feel appropriate, with each dog. Both dogs have been trained to use them and freely go in (with a treat!). But there are some situations, as described above, where giving them a bit more freedom makes sense for them (and makes me feel better). Plus they deserve a chance to show off all the hard work they put in during training! :)

    pennydesign: thank you. I really appreciate your support and I’m sorry my question opened up a can of worms. As to your question, we do have a dog gate (the black one pictured above) but it’s a stand alone (not secured) and heavy. A baby gate might be more useful but would likely be lower. I’d have to check.

    oakley: I haven’t noticed their handling during a dog show - I’ll have to remember to pay attention! I wil definitely do many test runs before I leave them alone with anything I come up with. In fact, that’s exactly how I learned about our little Houdini moving the gate!

    maddielee: yikes! I was worried about the heavy gate crashing down on her if she made it off balance, but I’ll keep that possibility in mind as well. Thanks!

  • Fori

    I like the gate you've got! Have you figured out how he's getting through? If you just need the ends secured, maybe something as simple as hook and eye hardware (2 per side, at least) would work.


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  • humbleandkind

    Fori: yes, I’ve watched her and she nudges the end away from the wall. I‘ve even tried moving chairs over each end but it only delays her by seconds. Hooks and stronger hinges may do the trick. I’m planning to ask our local hardware store for the best hardware options. Thanks for your response!

  • Oakley

    I haven't read all the replies, have pressure mounts been mentioned? Here's a dog gate with pressure mounts, but it's not wide enough for your doorway.


    Dog gate with pressure mounts

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  • Kool Beans

    Humble, you have a lovely way of living up to your name. :c) I’m glad you’ve been able to get some good ideas to toss around. When it comes to our animals, people here debate about crates, food and everything in between, but I see that as a good thing; it is an honest reflection of how many of us are passionate about our pets and their well being.


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  • humbleandkind

    Oakley: I don’t believe they were mentioned. I had some baby gates like that and I think it would be hard to use them in such a wide opening. But maybe not.

    Kool Beans: I agree that debate is very useful and I love how passionate people here are about their pets!

    As for my name, I actually cringe a bit every time I see it thinking how completely not humble it is to call yourself humble! When I signed up I was having a hard time coming up with something and then that song came on - it’s in my playlist as a reminder for my boys - so I tried it not thinking how it would come across. I should probably come up with something different. But I appreciate your comment because I try to live up to those standards and teach my boys to do the same! :)

  • Yayagal

    Do you have a laundry room, my daughter has an ample size one and puts the fur baby there with food and blankets and he's totally content.

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  • humbleandkind

    Yayagal: we do but it’s exceptionally small and the door doesn’t close all the way with our new washing machine (which sticks out beyond the door casing - I mistakenly thought they were all a standard size and didn’t check before we purchased it). it’s on our long list of things to fix, and likely will be a new thread at some point! Would have been a great idea though!

  • cpartist

    Honestly, just the idea of crating my dog gives me claustrophobia and makes me cringe.

    That's you projecting because most dogs find crates to be a safe place. It's like the den wild dogs raise their pups in.

    My dog goes to her crate when she is afraid or just wants some quiet time. (She's now almost 9 years old so we leave it open at all times.) She's been doing that since she was a puppy and was trained by her breeder to do so.

    When we got her, we'd train her to go in her crate with one or two favorite toys and a stuffed Kong. And if we had to leave, we'd definitely leave her with a Kong. When she got a bit older, we put together one of those larger plastic pens. I don't think they'd work for your dog since your dog is larger, but we'd put the crate within the pen. We'd come home and sure enough even though she had the pen, she'd still be in the crate (with the crate door open)

    About the only time I'd think crates are bad are if the dog was in a puppy mill.

    OP, I like the idea of building a "crate" for both dogs. I'm betting that when they want quiet time or get nervous, they'll gravitate there. To teach them to go into it, lure them with treats.

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  • Kool Beans

    I agree, dogs often consider them to be a safe spot, the difference for me, is whether that door is open or shut. When we brought our dog home as a puppy, we put an oversized travel crate out for her. She took ownership right away and loved it, but that door was never shut. We eventually replaced it with a bed for her, but she still knows, that’s her safe spot.

    Sadly, not everyone is as caring about their pets as we forum folk are so I don’t agree with the blanket statement that the only time they shouldn’t be used is in the case of mills. I was in a profession where I was routinely in other people’s homes; more times than not, I’d see dogs crated in crates that were either too small for them, did’t have water or food available or the dogs had been in there way too long and needed to GO. Putting our dog in a crate and closing the door is not what I want for our dog and I doubt that I’ll ever agree that they are the best option.

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  • humbleandkind

    cpartist: A crate for both dogs would be ideal. My plan was to build a large built in window seat/crate for the dogs in a double-wide dormer in our bedroom (with some way to section them off in case either ever needed their own space). But one contractor didn’t think it was a good idea because there’s a baseboard heater along the window wall and it may not be tall enough with the window seat. I also thought about gating that area of the bedroom off. Still thinking that through. They really don’t mind their crates now and will go in when told to (and are also rewarded with a treat and/or Kong depending on their length of stay!) but I’m generally home so it’s not overused. Maybe it’s my own issue but I’m concerned that if they need to spend too much time in there (when remodeling, for example) it will turn into a negative place for them. And, to be honest, I feel similar to Kool Beans in that I cringe at the thought of them being confined to such a small space for long periods without the option to stretch and walk around. In fact, I‘m embarrassed to admit that I will often skip a last errand while out or opt not do something that would take me out of the house for too long because of the guilt I feel if the dogs are crated. I know that sounds crazy to a lot of people, and it’s definitely my issue, but there it is. :)

  • pennydesign

    Well, what I don't like is the argument that implies that "my dog is happier/healthier/better adjusted/better behaved/(add whatever you like) than your dog because you don't crate".

    I don't and I never will use a crate. And don't tell me it's "wrong" in any way. Because I will have an equally superior argument backatcha... :)


    I'm fine with restricting an area and yes, Humble, now we have 2 dogs, I am mindful of when I should be home to let them out and be with them. So it's not crazy. It just means you're a responsible pet owner.



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  • humbleandkind

    pennydesign: I hear you. Like I said, we’ve worked with many different trainers and each has their own preferred method of training, but I prefer those who are less rigid about what is or is not the ”right” way to do things. Just like I parent each of my children a bit differently (they respond to very different reactions by me and consequences for them), I think you have to know your dog and what they respond best to. I definitely believe there is no single right way to raise a happy, well behaved dog!

  • pennydesign

    I'm sorry humble, I implied I was speaking of a specific person, and I'm not. I was speaking to the whole :) who have the same darn argument to me. Just to clarify.

    Any way. I hope this works out for you. Right now, I'm off to wash my rugs that my rescue vomited on....oh the joy. And how the heck do they manage to upchuck MORE than they ate??? And of course it has to be on the carpeted areas....

    WTH.

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  • humbleandkind

    pennydesign: I understand! Good luck with your cleanup. My older dog seeks out carpet when he throws up for some reason. The harder to clean the better It seems. You sound like a fabulous dog owner. I would happily come back as your dog!

  • Kool Beans

    I was thinking about this thread earlier today and remembered a time where our puppy needed to be enclosed when neither of us could be home. Instead of locking her up in her crate, I put her in our enclosed walk in shower. It’s big with a nice glass door. She had room to have water and play. I knew she’d be comfortable there and it was safe. It was also ideal because if she had to “go” it could be cleaned up very easily. It ended up being a really good option. Not suggesting that for Humble, Ellie was only 2-3 months old at the time; at 8 months your puppy is probably too big.

    I have to agree about the training, there are lots of methods and what works for one may not work for the other. Some breeds are also just easier to work with especially if they’re food driven.


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  • humbleandkind

    Kool Beans: what an innovative solution (and nice sized shower!)! We’re actually gearing up for a master bathroom remodel primarily to replace a tiny stall shower, so it won’t work for us but it’s a great idea to put out there!

  • Kool Beans

    I‘m embarrassed to admit that I will often skip a last errand while out or opt not do something that would take me out of the house for too long because of the guilt I feel if the dogs are crated. I know that sounds crazy to a lot of people, and it’s definitely my issue, but there it is. :)

    Ha Ha! I’m the same way!! Ellie has free reign over the house, but it bothers me to know she can’t GO if she needs to. Spoiled, very very spoiled.

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  • patriceny

    I don't think it's spoiled - I honestly think it's what responsible pet owners are supposed to do.

    Owning a dog and caring for them properly is not easy.

    I also love your shower idea. It's a fabulous idea for either a small dog or a puppy. Big enough to put a bed and a few toys, super easy clean-up for accidents, and really nothing they can hurt themselves on either.

    humbleandkind thanked patriceny
  • yeonassky

    I have read studies that has suggested that dogs over 3 years old are mature enough to not be crated.

    It doesn't hurt to refresh their training though to be ready in case of emergencies. You have to get them into the crate and they have to remain calm for a long period of time.

    humbleandkind thanked yeonassky
  • Kool Beans

    Thank you Patrice & Humble.

    You’re right, that is being a responsible owner. :c)

    humbleandkind thanked Kool Beans
  • cpartist

    Sadly, not everyone is as caring about their pets as we forum folk are so I don’t agree with the blanket statement that the only time they shouldn’t be used is in the case of mills. I was in a profession where I was routinely in other people’s homes; more times than not, I’d see dogs crated in crates that were either too small for them, did’t have water or food available or the dogs had been in there way too long and needed to GO. Putting our dog in a crate and closing the door is not what I want for our dog and I doubt that I’ll ever agree that they are the best option.

    You do bring up a good point that not every animal parent is a good parent. Ugh! However let's agree that we are not talking about bad dog parents in this case as is obvious.

    Let's also agree that the crate needs to be large enough for the dog to have room to move around, stand up etc and of course needs some toys, a place to rest and water!

    So the issue isn't that, but how to create the best space that's safe for the new dog.

    A crate for both dogs would be ideal. My plan was to build a large built in window seat/crate for the dogs in a double-wide dormer in our bedroom (with some way to section them off in case either ever needed their own space). But one contractor didn’t think it was a good idea because there’s a baseboard heater along the window wall and it may not be tall enough with the window seat.

    Too bad that would have been ideal.

    Maybe it’s my own issue but I’m concerned that if they need to spend too much time in there (when remodeling, for example) it will turn into a negative place for them.

    Not if it has always been associated with good things and not if they're ok with the noises.

    And, to be honest, I feel similar to Kool Beans in that I cringe at the thought of them being confined to such a small space for long periods without the option to stretch and walk around.

    We all agree it needs to be a spot that is large enough to stand up and be able to move around in a bit. The truth is that when dogs are home alone, they are mostly sleeping (or at least mine is). I know that because we have cameras. LOL. Of course with 2 dogs it may be different.

    In fact, I‘m embarrassed to admit that I will often skip a last errand while out or opt not do something that would take me out of the house for too long because of the guilt I feel if the dogs are crated. I know that sounds crazy to a lot of people, and it’s definitely my issue, but there it is. :)

    Ok true story. We were at my step son's engagement party. It was 11:30 PM and I normally walk my dog at midnight. The party was still going strong and DH and I went up to the couple and told them we had to leave to walk the dog. (We were made to feel guilty for doing so but tough! LOL)

    I wouldn't feel good crating a dog all day, but if it's just for several hours, (under 4 hours max ideally, but could in an emergency be stretched to 5) I don't see a problem.

    Any way. I hope this works out for you. Right now, I'm off to wash my rugs that my rescue vomited on....oh the joy. And how the heck do they manage to upchuck MORE than they ate??? And of course it has to be on the carpeted areas....

    Yes what's with that? Mine never upchucks on the hardwood floors where it's easy to clean up. She specifically moves to the rug! Go figure. LOL.

    I was thinking about this thread earlier today and remembered a time where our puppy needed to be enclosed when neither of us could be home. Instead of locking her up in her crate, I put her in our enclosed walk in shower.

    What a great idea! Wish I had known that idea back when mine was a puppy.

    I have read studies that has suggested that dogs over 3 years old are mature enough to not be crated.

    It doesn't hurt to refresh their training though to be ready in case of emergencies. You have to get them into the crate and they have to remain calm for a long period of time.

    Ours was fine not being crated once she turned 2 years old.

    However she's also trained to go into one of those airline carriers and when we get to the airport, we put the carrier on the ground and she jumps into it. (We travel back and forth between NY/FL and she's an excellent flyer. Doesn't faze her one bit.

    When we take her in the car, we use the airline carrier to secure her for safety reasons. She loves going for car rides in it too.

    humbleandkind thanked cpartist
  • pamghatten

    I only crate my rescue dogs when they are new to me and I don't know them, or they me. When they have settled in and I know they aren't going to eat the house when I am gone, they are allowed to be in the house and not in a crate.

    When I got my current female from a rescue, it was only with the understanding that I don't crate her. She had been neglected, and spent the first year of her life in a too small crate. A family member told her owners to surrender her since no dog should live in a crate. So she was terrified of them. Luckily, she's such a sweet dog, there was no need for a crate.

    humbleandkind thanked pamghatten
  • Yayagal

    A simple solution would be to use the laundry room by switching the door hinges to the other side so it opens opposite the obstruction.

    humbleandkind thanked Yayagal
  • humbleandkind

    Yayagal : I’m not sure why I never thought to do that - have the door put on the outside of the casing so it opens up into the hallway! That would definitely solve some laundry room issues I have, but I still think it would be tight in the laundry room for two dogs. One dog bed wouldn’t even fit width-wise on the floor space. It’s so narrow you have to close the front loader door to get around it.

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