francesca_loudon

Help selecting shrubs or trees to replace current landscaping

AC LB
July 11, 2019

We planted our landscaping a few years ago with the help of a local nursery landscape designer. We are disappointed the shrubs against the house have not done well and have decided to replace them. We feel the shrubs and trees on the left side of our house looks great, but may need to balance the opposite side by adding more. What would you recommend as far as shrubs/decorative trees? We get full sun. Thank you for your time.

Comments (15)

  • AC LB

    More pics

  • floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

    Vital information missing..... where are you situated geographically? Also it might be a good idea to identify the plants on the right and try to find out why they haven't done well. And they certainly look rather small for a few year's growth. If it's a cultural problem there's no guarantee anything else will do better.

  • AC LB

    Thank you for reminding me floral! I live in central New York and my house is facing east. The 6 shrubs that are planted against the house are Japanese andromendas.

  • PRO
    Dig Doug's Designs

    some ideas:


    The plants are: "Iceberg" Sawara Cypress, "Montrose Ruby" Coral Bells. "Bill Brincka" Hosta, potted Heliotrope & "Royal Purple" Smoke Tree.

  • AC LB

    Oohhh I love your ideas Doug!!! Thank you!!

  • marymd7

    The pieris (andromeda) look chlorotic to me, while the roses and spirea further forward do not. Pieris ike acidic soil and that's likely the problem. They could maybe use a dose of an acidic fertilizer like Holly Tone or just a handful of garden sulphur. There are also many pieris cultivars - some are quite short, some a bit taller. Are you sure you've planted the right form for that location? They're nice plants, and they need a bit more time to get established than knock-out roses and spireas do, but check the cultivar and consider some fertilization in lieu of replanting them. If you're set on replanting, with that eastern exposure, you might just whack some hydrangeas in there, unless your set on evergreen foliage AND flowers, in which case I would nurse those pieris along a bit more.

  • AC LB

    Thank you Mary! So you think I can save them with some tlc? I will give it some time to see if I can save them! Thank you!

  • marymd7

    Yes, I'd try some TLC. If the relative bareness in the area while they're getting established bothers you, fill in with more perennials or annuals in the meantime. You've got a few clumps of what looks to be maybe salvia, but they're not big or plentiful enough to carry the current weight of the space. This would, again, be a temporary fix while the pieris get their footing. Common perennials like shasta daisies, rudbeckia goldsturm, sedem 'autumn joy', and some hosta varieties get bigger and are usually available at reasonable prices (better yet, you might have friends or neighbors who have divided some in their own gardens and are happy to give you a few bags full). You can move them elsewhere once the pieris get big enough.


  • AC LB

    Dig Doug’s Design can you please tell me the shrubs and plants you used in your mock-up? Thank you in advance!

  • PRO
    Dig Doug's Designs

    The plants are: "Iceberg" Sawara Cypress, "Montrose Ruby" Coral Bells. "Bill Brincka" Hosta, potted Heliotrope & "Royal Purple" Smoke Tree.

  • AC LB

    Thank you so much!

  • AC LB

    Our local nursery recommended boxwood shrubs which they currently have in stock and on sale. I originally was leaning towards a burgundy colored shrub. What are your thoughts on boxwood shrubs? Are they high maintenance?

  • PRO
    Dig Doug's Designs

    Boxwoods can be subject to disease. Check the availability of Hoogendorn & Soft touch Holly.

  • mad_gallica

    So long as they are one of the hardier types of boxwood, all they will require is an annual trimming once they are established.

    As far as determining how hardy the specific cultivar they are selling is, you will either have to do your own research or trust the nursery. You can check the website of the Morton Arboretum outside of Chicago, or the Missouri Botanical Garden. In general, you don't want plants labelled Buxus sempervirens, but hybrids or plants labelled Buxus microphylla or koreana.

  • AC LB

    Any idea what the name of these shrubs is?

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