khenricksen

picea omorika information

khenricksen
12 days ago

Hi there, I have been trying to pick the right tree for my space. I like the picea omorika but am concerned because I would like a tree that will be less than 30-40 ft in 30 yrs and less than 15-20 ft wide. There are varying stats on this tree and was wondering if anyone could help with the age/height/width of their picea omorika and what conditions it grew in.

I am in Olympia,WA and the site for the tree is full sun, clay, a little elevated so no standing water.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read this!
Kelli

Comments (13)

  • Embothrium
    12 days ago

    Look at P. omorika 'Nana'.

  • plantkiller_il_5
    12 days ago

    Think this is 'Pendula



    this would be 'Nana' on left



  • Embothrium
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    Actually it's the typical species or a selection that looks comparatively typical. For shortness original poster should try the one I suggested.

  • maackia
    12 days ago

    I've got two P. omorika 'Nana', but they look very different. I think the first is more to the standard, while the second is...different. The first was obtained from a small, but well-managed, independent nursery, while the last one was from Lowe's. Something to consider.


  • Embothrium
    12 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    Notice the second one is now starting to produce leaders also. Position of scion wood on stock plants and vigor of rootstock used both affect how vigorous and tree-like resulting specimens turn out to be. Hence 20' tall 'Nana Lutea' Hinoki and 40' tall Pinus strobus Nana Group. And the 'Nana' Serbian spruce I have here displaying even more horsepower than the one in the next to last picture above - descriptions based on original seedling variants on their own roots do not fit what the production industry puts out grafted on seedlings of wild species with normal vigor. It is the presumably unintended reverse of grafting fruiting or flowering trees on weak rootstocks in order to dwarf their tops.

  • khenricksen
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    Thank you for your posts. As beautiful as Nana is, it is too small for my space, I need something that will be taller than 15-20 ft (before 20 yrs). I should have included that in the original post. I have been trying to find a bruns serbian spruce - the straight bruns and not the pendula. But am having trouble locating them and I need 3. So was hoping people had found the straight serbian spruce to be shorter/smaller in cultivation than reported since its easier to find. I may have to wait until fall for the next nursery digs, regardless.

  • Embothrium
    11 days ago

    A 'Nana' Serbian spruce at 5565 NE Windermere Rd. in Seattle was 11 1/2 ft. tall in 2005. But you're not going to have anything shoot up tall very quickly and then level off except running bamboo.

  • plantkiller_il_5
    11 days ago
    last modified: 11 days ago

    I think Gee farms has 'Burns'

    but would not ship mail order till fall

    ron

    I got 'Berliners Weeper' from them

  • Sara Malone Zone 9b
    11 days ago

    Yes one of the weepers would likely work better as they are pretty narrow. 'Pendula Bruns' has all kinds of weird bends and kinks in it; very sculptural.

  • Embothrium
    11 days ago

    Non-dwarf Serbian spruce grow well above the desired height cutoff stated in the original post.

  • whaas_5a
    11 days ago

    30-40 ft in 30 yrs and less than 15-20 ft wide


    I'm not familar with Olympia, WA growing conditions but Picea omorika 'Bruns' (not Pendula Bruns) doesn't get even close to hitting those numbers in that timeframe around here. Only the species has that potential.


    Here is the growth rate from Conifer Society - its dead nuts with what growth rate I've seen on two different properties.


    After 10 years of growth, a mature specimen will measure 6 feet (2 m) tall and 2.5 feet (75 cm) wide, an annual growth rate of 6 to 8 inches (15 - 20 cm).

  • tsugajunkie z5 SE WI ♱
    11 days ago

    My ‘Bruns” is around 18 years old in half shade (maybe more) and grew slowly for the first 10 years. In years 10-15 it grew 6-8 inches per year and has increased since then due in no small part to the electric company butchering a neighbor’s walnut two years ago giving it more light. This year it has 12 inches of growth and is about 15 feet tall. Still only about 6 feet in diameter.

    tj

  • khenricksen
    Original Author
    10 days ago

    Thank you all for your info! And thank you to tsugajunkie, that was exactly the kind of real life stats I needed to help decide :) sounds like I am destined to search for bruns, or find a dwarf deodara! (Or a mountain hemlock that likes clay, lol....). I so love trees!!!

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