sam_md

¿Que pasó??????

sam_md
11 months ago

What happened?

Pictured here is a Capitata Yew. It caught my eye because over the last 25 years it hadn't been butchered up. It still had all of it's lower branches.

April 2019 it was moved to its new location. June of this year two branches turned brown. I thought yews were supposed to be disease and insect tolerant? Rainfall has been plentiful. Are more branches gonna die? What caused this?



Comments (13)

  • tsugajunkie z5 SE WI ♱
    11 months ago

    Damaged in transport? It was a big plant to move so maybe cracked in the move and died this year.

    tj

  • maackia
    11 months ago

    Tree was possibly too large for size of spade used?

    Why was it moved?

  • sam_md
    Original Author
    11 months ago


    50% of the labor was used just to tie up the branches. A couple of the bottom branches got scraped a little but healed over. The brown branches were not damaged in the move. The entire lot next to the bank is to be cleared. It is worth repeating that brown color did not show up 'till June of this year.

  • maackia
    11 months ago

    This is like an Agatha Christie novel.

  • Embothrium
    11 months ago

    May need to be watered

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    11 months ago

    it is not uncommon to see damage a season or two later ..

    for me.. it usually showed after winter .. the drying winds.. icy cold.. etc ...


    in milder climes.. it wouldnt surprise me that the damage might not show until the heat of summer hit ... whats the weather background been since the move??


    ken

  • sam_md
    Original Author
    11 months ago

    sam_md, did you mean to show us more about the dead branches? Why not check out the dead branches more carefully and get back with us.

  • sam_md
    Original Author
    11 months ago


    Here's what I found. These holes are not only on several branches but many on the main trunk also.. The concern is that this could spread, more branches die and someone will be stuck with an unsightly tree.

  • maackia
    11 months ago

    Frass holes??

  • tsugajunkie z5 SE WI ♱
    11 months ago

    Looks like Sapsucker holes.

    tj

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    11 months ago

    Sap Sucker was my first thoughts also but the branch seems so tiny for those.

    What diameter are the holes? Sap Suckers generally have ~1/8" diameter holes, give or take, depending on the size of the branch/trunk. They'll dig them out very large if the cambium permits.

    Also holes in the bark can indicate an insect problem.

  • sam_md
    Original Author
    11 months ago


    So we're agreed, sapsucker. I really could have done without that.

  • Bill_minn_3b {West Central MN}
    11 months ago
    last modified: 11 months ago

    Yes, sapsuckers routinely make their holes in 'lines' or 'rows', a dead giveaway.

    Insects not so much and their holes are generally less numerous and more 'scattered'.