rosecanadian

Pictures from Carol in Alberta

rosecanadian
7 days ago

This is my 4th time trying to post pictures over a few days. I finally remembered that I should put the text first...and then add the pictures later.


So here's my 4th attempt. LOL

Comments (100)

  • Diane Brakefield
    4 days ago

    Flowers, I have plenty of Dara seed to spare--I'll send some. When did you do your successive sowings of orlaya? Or did you plant actual plants instead of seed? I only toss out seed. My bluebells are quite invasive, and I've torn out a lot of it. But still I like the stuff so much I will put up with the invasiveness. It blooms for months. I'll see if I can collect some seed.


    Carol, we either get the type of storm you describe, or more often, just little piddly bits of rain that last five minutes, producing .01 inch precip. We haven't had a speck in July and most of June with none predicted. You must try divinity. Either you'll love it or think it too sweet. My mom always put nuts on top of each piece. Which does make it less sweet. Diane

    rosecanadian thanked Diane Brakefield
  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    Berrypie - is Palatine's new list up??? Or do you mean the ones from France from Palatine? I would love it if their whole list is up!!! Yuck...you've got really hot weather coming. Blech.


    Diane - Yes!!! Same with us!! It's one extreme to the other. I remember when I was in my 20s and we went to Hawaii...I thought...wow...what wonderful rain!! You could even use an umbrella (wouldn't get ripped out of your hands) if you wanted one. It was wonderful, warm, soft rain....with no wind. You really need some rain. I really, really love sweet!! LOL

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  • joeywyomingz4b
    3 days ago

    Carol what size are your black pots? Do you just overwinter in those pots or do you have to put them in something larger? Is there a minimum size to ensure winter survival? I'm going to have to have a lot of roses in the garage this winter, doing my research now!

  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Hi Joey,

    My black pots are 19" vertically and 89" round the barrel (not the rim). Husband says 25 gallons. I put my pots on boards so they're not in contact with the concrete. Is this necessary? I don't know. LOL I water them really, really well before they go in the garage, and then I water them a cup per rose starting in January.


  • joeywyomingz4b
    3 days ago

    Thank you!! That is helpful!

    rosecanadian thanked joeywyomingz4b
  • berrypie7
    3 days ago

    The list of french roses will take me all day to look up specs on HMF, I did look at the fantastic sold out photos on Palatines site. I wonder how many hours ( years ) I have spent virtual rose window shopping .

    rosecanadian thanked berrypie7
  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    3 days ago

    I have not taken a job there, Diane, but I can also recommend Vermont country store Chocolate covered cherries. (regular ones.) I got a gift of the alcoholic ones once and they were too strong. I am terrible. Of course, we should all be eating kale.

    rosecanadian thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
    3 days ago

    Diane, I sowed a few orlaya seeds in Nov. to see if they would survive winter. Success! Then, in May, I started sowing a few every couple weeks. I believe they all came up.

    The pk. of c. rotundafolia seed was about an 1/8th tsp. of dust. I assumed that was the seed. It was difficult to 'sow' since I couldn't feel anything between my fingers.

    I just looked it up online and found that they are small, but big enough to see. So, what they sent me was an empty envelope. I will try again.

    https://graniteseed.com/seed/wildflowers-forbs/harebell/https://www.toronto.com/events/8898503--high-park-seed-collecting/

    They look very tedious to collect. I'll try my Northwest Seed store here in town.

    Carol, I did it again. It's Diane's fault.

    rosecanadian thanked flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
  • Diane Brakefield
    3 days ago

    Sheila, maybe chocolate covered kale--really good chocolate about a half inch thick. I think we have the same candy likes because I really like chocolate covered cherries, too. But I agree that I would want the teatotaler's version. I have noticed the Vermont Country Store's choc cherries, too. I love good English toffee covered in lots of chocolate, and chocolate covered "seafoam" candy, which is hard to get. Oh, I feel a chocolate binge coming on. I think there are a few Dove pieces around here somewhere. Diane

  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    You're welcome, Joey. :)


    Berrypie - so true!! And it's so much fun!! :)


    Sheila - I eat Kale in a smoothie...so it's delicious surrounded by cranberry/grape juice, mangos, pineapple, blueberries, and strawberries!!


    Flowers - Diane will gladly take the blame, I'm sure, if you will take the blame when she orders too many things. Quid pro quo. :)


    Diane - I love chocolate covered anything. YUM!!

  • Diane Brakefield
    3 days ago

    What am I being blamed for? Was it because the C. rotundifolia didn't come up for Flowers? They probably did send you dust. I am going to try to gather some seeds from that stuff. When the bluebells reseed, I have noticed that the seedlings are very tiny and don't look like a mature plant at all. I think I overlooked them when they came up for me the first year because they didn't bloom, I know. I was so shocked to see this clump the next year blooming away. I thought it was anchusa because I had sown some of that (and I got Chinese forget me not instead). Sheila identified the clump as Campanula rotundifolia, and I didn't even remember buying such seed. I finally came across the packet in my records a little while ago. Duh. I'm sure you have wanted to know all this detail. By the way, why is it rotundifolia (like me from eating too many chocolates?). And why is the robin's scientific name, Turdus migratoria (I actually have an idea about that, since they are really, really messy birds around here).


    Carol, that's a fruit smoothie that happens to have a bit of kale in it.


    Flowers, thanks for the tip about sowing orlaya seed. That's how I used to sow hollyhock seed (which I left in the seed cases). I have a feeling that orlaya can sow itself quite nicely without my interference....but just to be sure, maybe I should throw some seed in the husks out in November. Then I'll definitely have an all orlaya flower bed. Diane

  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Diane - yes, you are right as I hang my head in kale shame. LOL

    Rotundifolia...I have that too!!! I thought it was a rare condition. :)

    Turdus migratoria...seriously? Hahaha love it!

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    3 days ago

    I got 3 campanula rotundifolia plants from Prairie Moon nursery this Spring, if anyone wanted to skip the seeding. That is a great nursery.

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  • Diane Brakefield
    3 days ago

    Carol, kale shame is the worst. Next you will tell us you make brussel sprout smoothies. To make you feel better, I'll tell you that it is nearly 11 pm, and it's 95F. Tomorrow it's 105F again. And I was outside tonight doing chores. I was surprised to see that The Prince had many lovely blooms that were not thrips ridden and not crunchy burnt up. What a surprise. Also looking good are Munstead Wood, Tamora (as always), Boscobel, and Golden Celebration. Even Twilight Zone had some really dark blooms that were not burnt up. I am amazed, and I took pics, too. I am feeling better. The heat is not as bad as the wind.


    Thanks for the tip, Sheila. I'm making a note of Prairie Moon nursery. It sounds like they have some unusual plants. How are those blue bells doing? I love learning about new plant sellers and new plants (to me, like Maltese Cross). Diane

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Diane - oh the horror!!!! Brussel sprout smoothies!!!

    I'm amazed that you can have roses that look good at those temperatures...and they'd been in the heat all day as well. Just checked and Maltese Cross is zone 3-10!! Now that's a pretty wide span.

  • flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
    3 days ago

    I will stick with 'robin' and forget the correct name.

    Diane, I meant you were to blame for going off topic. I was just as guilty, but thought I'd shift the blame to you. We've hijacked Carol's thread.

    I'm happy to hear you found some nice surprises among your roses. My new this year Darcy Bussell has been everything Dianela said she was. Non stop blooms, and she ignores the heat, 101˚F today, 104˚F tomorrow. St. Swithun looks pretty good, and Johann Strauss. I don't remember noticing him doing so well in heat, before. Best heat resistant rose is Sonia Rykiel.

    Sheila, I'm going to order the c. rotundafolia from Prairie Moon. I bet those bloom the first year, too. If they reseed, a few starts will be all I need.

    rosecanadian thanked flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
  • Diane Brakefield
    3 days ago

    OK, I am sorry for the hijacking, Carol. But this thread has been fun--kind of like a nutty seasonal thread. That is a wide number of zones that Maltese Cross can grow in. It reminds me of the blue bells we've been discussing. There are photos of it thriving in Greenland and other really cold places, but it's also known to grow in some parts of California. I would think the climate here would be totally wrong for this plant, but nooo. It's starting up all over the place.


    Flowers, I hate to see you spend money on C. rotund--if only I could send plant material to Washington. And, I'm still quarantining, so no trips to the post office for me, either I even gave my gardening friend a big start of the bells back in May. You certainly grow such a great variety of roses. I didn't know you grew St. Swithin and Johann Strauss. More roses to look up. Of course, I want to grow Sonia and Madame Isaac. That one is such a stunning rose. I couldn't believe the size of it on HMF. Almost all those who grew Madame Isaac were Europeans, and they did a splendid job with this rose. You need to start a thread of your beautiful roses. Diane

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  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    2 days ago

    The Prairie Moon campanula are doing great but one is a lighter blue. I had to cage them because the creatures attacked.

    Hopefully, they will be released from jail soon. I don't know how Ingrid stands it.
    I realize I overshot on the cage size. I grew Maltese Cross in Alaska easily. They seeded all over. I think they came from Russia.

    rosecanadian thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • mjkjrobinson
    2 days ago

    I live in B.C., where it"s been 37 for two wks. to hot for man or beast. The roses ere fine this morning, but we"ve had hot muggy heat all day and night! Hopefully we"ll cool down soon!


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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    2 days ago
    last modified: 2 days ago

    There is no hijacking on this thread. Everything is welcome. :)

    mjkr - yes, I hope your weather cools down soon. Muggy heat is the worst.

    Here are some roses from the yard!

    Parade Day....smells wonderful! Bedard is an awesome hybridizer!!



    Fragrant Plum



    Fragrant Plum bud


    Memorial Day and a bumble bee friend📷



    Nuts....nothing there...and it smelled sooo good!



    Portrait



    Augusta Luise



    Zaide and ladybug friend



    Soeur Emmanuelle



    Buxom Beauty with an ant friend



    Chandos Beauty



    Chandos Beauty again



    Parade Day again



    Berolina



    Chartreuse de Parme



  • Diane Brakefield
    2 days ago

    Carol, what a lovely group of roses and friends. Chandos Beauty really stands out for its stunning looks and delicate shading. That rose impresses me. I loved your insect photos, especially the bumblebee. I am worried about our bumblebees which have been decreasing in abundance around here. I think a lot of it is loss of habitat as more hills fill up with houses. Bumbles are my favorite bee. We still see lots of honey bees, which is good. Back to your roses--Parade Day looks like a super bloomer. It's another standout and so is Chartreuse de Parme. And even Augusta Luise. What a beauty in the soft shades I like. Has she grown much in her pot? I am so impressed with the variety of roses you grow so well under some pretty demanding conditions. Well done.....It was another scorcher here (105F), and I'd say the roses held up pretty well (better than I did). The only rose whose blooms were totally heat destroyed is old Brother Cadfael. He stands out as "Heat Wimp 2020". Every one of his blooms were crunchy messes. I had to cut them all off. As we say in our family, "that's a First World problem", and things could be lots worse. I can't wait for my big crop of tomatoes to turn red. They're starting, but running a little late. Diane

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  • flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
    2 days ago
    last modified: 2 days ago

    Carol, I am blown away by all your gorgeous roses. Each one is superb. Your Parade Day is the best I've ever seen. I would like to compare it to Raspberry Cream Twirl. Do you think they're almost twins? Except for RCT being a climber.
    I'm thrilled to see how beautiful Soeur Emmanuelle is. I just planted one. Now, I'm really excited. Chandos Beauty is ravishing and I'm kicking myself for not getting Fragrant Plum. I almost came home with it a couple days ago. Now I'm sorry I put it back. Hate it when i do that.

    Chartreuse de Parme is exquisite. I think I've heard it doesn't do well here, but will have to check that out again, because I'd love to grow it. I might be thinking of Yves Piaget that doesn't like cold winters.

    With all those blooms, it would be hard to ever go in the house. Your yard looks cool and inviting and very fragrant.

    rosecanadian thanked flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
  • cyndita (west coast zone 9)
    2 days ago
    last modified: 2 days ago

    Wonderful roses, Carol! And, I also love the splashes of color from your companion plants. I am a huge fan of Bishop's Castle - it's gorgeous as in Carol's photos, drapes prettily, and is highly fragrant. It's probably near the end of it's DA shelf life, so for anyone who is interested, I would recommend getting it now.

    I have to admit I also enjoyed the candy discussion here - no one in my family is much of a cook, and the only thing I can recall my beloved late mother baking was peanut butter cookies made w/ Crisco, with the fork tine cross on the top. But, I love hearing stories like that!

    Here's a Bishop's Castle picture - if you expand the picture you can see that it's still in a too small plastic pot, and I just tossed some rose food on top - keep it fed & watered, and it's happy! (Not sure how it does in hot temps - my yard gets the coastal marine layer, so tends to be cooler.)


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  • Rae Dilly
    2 days ago

    Gorgeous!

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  • Nola z5aWI
    2 days ago

    Carol - What beautiful roses! I am so impressed with Parade Day's blooms, they are so full of character! I also have Chartreuse de Parme, it's just small yet, but I'm so looking forward to seeing it next year after seeing your picture! Your Parade Day reminds me of Rosa Mundi which I have been intrigued by, but I don't know if it's the actual rose or the story that goes with it. I wonder why people name their roses after mistress's of all the names out there? Lady Emma Hamilton?

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  • berrypie7
    2 days ago
    last modified: 2 days ago

    Too hot to bake, but a good day to go through recipes .




    Somehow I mustered up the energy to go out and do all the deadheading, which led to weeding , and then I had to tie up some plants. My legs are rubbery, I'm done but happy. I'd be happier if I had a peanut butter cookie .

  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
    2 days ago

    Parade day and Chandros Beauty!!! So beautiful!

    Did someone say peanut butter cookies?

  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday

    You're welcome, Carol, and I love your great comments. They have substance, but are fun to read. I think the temperature made it to only 102F today, and will be "cooling down to the 90s in another day or two. Aside from Brother Cad, the cad, things are holding up well. I want to hijack briefly and post some bumblebee pics from earlier in summer/late spring that my son in law took. The bee is in a penstemon bloom. I've only seen about two bumble bees all season in spite of all my flowers that appeal to them. I remember 10 years ago when they loved my hollyhocks and routinely fell asleep at night in them. I worried they wouldn't wake up, or would die in the flowers, but that never happened. I miss them so much. I'm going outside in a few minutes--maybe it's cool enough at last. Diane

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    yesterday

    Wow, Diane!!! Those bumbles look so ROBUST!!! They look like weight lifters!! LOL Their wings are also so dark and leathery...like bat wings! Maybe it's just that your son-in-law's pictures are so well taken! I just looked in my photos to find pictures of bees...but they're all lost....when my computer died. Dang...I lost soooo many pictures. Do you have any perennial sage? Bees can't resist that....although penstemon is pretty fabulous to bees too....and you have that. Do you have a water source for your bees with rocks to land on so they don't fall in to the water? That really helps.


    I love to read your comments too, Diane!! Everyone here is just wonderful! :)

    And, cooling down is good no matter that it's still pretty hot. I sure wouldn't want to live with such warm temperatures though. Vive zone 3!! LOL

  • katyajini
    yesterday

    I dont know how you do it Carol. How do you grow such beautiful, healthy and plentiful roses in pots? I remember seeing a picture of your Grande Dame, oh my!!! Do you still grow that Grande Dame? That picture got me into GD. You are doing awesome!👍😁

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  • Marlorena-z8 England-
    yesterday

    Fun thread, I've just read it all...

    Wonderful roses Carol, you do such a great job with them in pots, from Calgary... just to say about Chandos Beauty, this rose has great foliage... where my Tantau's are black spotting, this rose is 95% clean, the leaves are large and glossy and even without blooms is a pleasure to look at... I do find it slow to repeat, I experience about a month gap between flushes.. mine is just starting again now..

    ...talking of Campanula rotundifolia.. here's a photo I took of it with the Yellowstone Buffalo herd..


    rosecanadian thanked Marlorena-z8 England-
  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    yesterday

    katya - no, my Grand Dame died over winter when my daughter left the garage door open for 3 hours during a really cold spell. I lost about 25 roses. I really miss that rose. I even lost the pictures because my computer died. Sigh. Thanks, Katya...my roses are doing pretty well...but most of them are new bare roots...so most of them are still "learning how to be good roses." LOL So I'm not showing you the roses that aren't doing so well. :)


    Marlorena - Thanks so much!!! My Chandos Beauty took a long time to get going because of the garage door being left open...it was a set back. I find that once CB gets going...it always has blooms. Maybe a few...but always some. And the blooms last and last on the bush. It's my favorite rose. What a cool picture!! Beautiful!!!

  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday

    Carol, I have read the the larger, early appearing bumblebees are queens, and that the smaller workers appear later. I know I've observed different sizes of these bees and different types of bumblebees. We have one with an orange belt that appeared a lot until this year. It had less black on it, and it was a favorite of mine. I grow many lavender plants, Russian sage, Jupiter's Beard, catmint, Buddleia, and dozens and dozens of coneflowers, and in the past, the bumbles loved these plants, especially the coneflowers. I fear their population out here has greatly diminished because they just aren't coming around.


    Marlorena, that's a wonderful photo, but the Campanula rotundifolia looks so different from mine, which grows in rounded messy clumps, and is kind of floppy. Do you have any close ups of the Yellowstone plants? Here's a close up of mine. Diane

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  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday

    I was trying to find the bumblebee with the orange belt photo. Phooey. Diane

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  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday

    OK, I found the photos of the bumblebee with the belt of orange. I miss these guys. He's on some campanula (not rotundifolia), and the bumblebee above is on butterfly bush. Diane

  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday




    The bee is on veronica. It's getting late. Diane

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  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday

    How the heck did I get to be #3 on the top commenters list? Harharhar. I'm a blabbermouth tonight. It's all because of this thread, Carol. Diane

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  • Marlorena-z8 England-
    yesterday
    last modified: yesterday

    Diane.. I've tried to zoom in on my picture a bit but can't really tell... I only understood them to be that because the Park people had put up a sign to say what those blue flowers were, otherwise I would not have known - never heard of them before... maybe growing in grass makes them look different?.. otherwise perhaps some mistake by the park authorities..


    I wonder if Carol has seen these plants on the prairies of Alberta?

    rosecanadian thanked Marlorena-z8 England-
  • Diane Brakefield
    yesterday

    Carol grows a campanula that's similar, but we couldn't decide if it was rotundifolia. Thanks for trying to zoom in on this photo. I think C. rotundifolia is very widely dispersed even though most people haven't heard of it. Sheila grew it in Alaska, and she just got a few plants recently. She's in zone 8 now in southern Oregon. Maybe the reason it's kind of messy and floppy for me is it's really too hot here for the plant in summer. And I don't think it wants much water. The biggest clumps probably get too much because they grow near roses. Diane

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  • Vaporvac Z6-OhioRiverValley
    yesterday

    Gorgeous pics, Marlorena. Diane, I used to grow it and think it doesn't like my wet clay conditions. I also think I had it planted in too much shade. I had many varieties of Campanula that I should try them all again. One of my favorites was a C.Trachelium. It persisted for years until recently when I had to redo the invaded bed. That and Filipendula Vulagare were somehow removed. F.Vulagare is a lovely plant. It's been wonderful just now looking over the dozens of plants I used to grow. Wish I still had at least a few of them. Now it's just lilies, shade plants, stachus, black eyed Susans and Purple coneflowers.... and one lone lavender. Now that I've removed the midge landscape fabric I hope to get some Walker's Low or its baby brother. and maybe plant some Alyssum next spring.

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  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    18 hours ago

    Marlorena's photo is lovely but that blue is not campanula rotundifolia. Marlorena's photo looks more like a lupine perhaps. It is more vertical while c. rotundifolia is all floppy.

    rosecanadian thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • Diane Brakefield
    17 hours ago

    Thank you, Sheila, for reassuring me about the bluebells. It's been such a mystery, and I was hoping it was finally solved. How are your new plants coming along? Diane

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  • rosecanadian
    Original Author
    15 hours ago

    Diane - I didn't even know there is a scale for measuring top commentator. LOL :) Yes, I've seen the HUGE queen bumblebees...kind of freaked me out (the first time) seeing these GIGANTIC bumblebees in my perennial garden (and the smaller workers hadn't been hatched yet)...I knew they had to be queens. Yes, one of the bees we get has the orange belt. I love bumbles!! There are so many types. I really hope the bees find your garden and they will make a comeback. A garden with bees is all the richer for it. :) Those are GREAT pictures of bees!!! Amazing photography!!! Wonderful perennials!! And, yes, that delightful bee is the same type that we get!!


    Marlorena - I can't tell if I've seen them...too fuzzy. :) But it's a beautiful picture!!



  • Diane Brakefield
    3 hours ago

    Carol, it's finally dropping below 100F today, but it's breezy which I hate when it's combined with heat. Things look pretty good, but I water constantly, which is really getting annoying when it comes to all the peppers, basil, etc in pots. Twice a day I'm out there pampering this stuff. I picked our first fully ripe tomato yesterday, and my piggy daughter ate it up before I could get a sample. Blast her. And I'm the one who has to babysit the hose when watering the tomatoes in their raised bed. Just joking about my daughter, but I did razz her plenty, as you can imagine. One rose that's doing well in this prolonged heat wave is Augusta Luise. This pic was taken July 21, and I'll take more tonight. I'm hijacking your thread again, Carol. Get out their and take pics of your garden. Diane

  • Diane Brakefield
    3 hours ago




  • Diane Brakefield
    3 hours ago

    The top pic is Augusta Luise, taken in the evening of July 21 in near 100F heat. The second pic is Evelyn, taken July 21 when it was above 100F. Both roses are great in heat. Diane

  • Diane Brakefield
    3 hours ago

    Oops, Evelyn pic taken July 27. Diane