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captains6

Waterproof Window Treatment for Wood Window in Shower?

captains6
8 years ago
The photo shows an original window in the bathtub/shower. We are not ready (nor do we have the funds), to update the window to a vinyl window, and to change the pink tile and "tile-in" the window casing to make it waterproof. The wood window (with wood moulding around it) is there to stay for a couple more years (also sticking around the next couple of years is the PINK tile - yuck!). Previous owners did not use that bathroom for showers, only for baths. We want to use it for showers, but will not start to do so until we find an attractive method to COMPLETELY cover the entire window and casing whenever we shower (which will be daily). I don't like the idea of a mini shower curtain as I have websearched is a popular quick thing to do, as we are looking for something we more design flare. I am thinking about a nice quality "Roller Blind" or "Roller Shade", however, I am thinking it would need to be one that specifically is manufactured with as a "waterproof" material, as mildew and waterstains (and general nastiness from such a daily wet exposure) would likely result if it is not a waterproof material. Does anyone have any ideas, or sources for a waterproof Roller Blind/Shade? Also, it would be more decorative if it came with a matching cassette/valance, which would conceal the roller mechanism...

Comments (40)

  • PRO
    Hudson Street Design
    8 years ago
    Google blinds for shower window. They suggest vinyl or water proof shutters.
    captains6 thanked Hudson Street Design
  • captains6
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    Hudson St Design, thanks for the reply, but over days of trying to find a true waterproof blind, I have learned that vinyl is not suitable for true wet use. I have found this company, with beautiful waterproof roller blinds, specifically built as truly waterproof, but I can't seem to find a domestic source for this type of product:
    http://www.tradeblinds.co.uk/pvc-waterproof_roller-blinds-c
    I especially like the first color listed, called "Planet Black".
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  • apple_pie_order
    8 years ago
    @captains: many companies will ship overseas. Ask them.
    captains6 thanked apple_pie_order
  • PRO
    ReSquare Architecture + Construction
    8 years ago
    Why not a cheap vinyl roller blind? Build a nice valance above out of plastic lumber molding. Wipe down the vinyl regularly with a bleach solution. When it gets gross, just replace it, they are cheap.
  • Geneviève
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    The solution for this would be to have a ceiling track that wraps around the tub .
    Sunrise Oval 58 Inch Shower Curtain Ring · More Info

    Transitional Bathroom · More Info
  • PRO
    South East Installation Solutions, LLC
    8 years ago
    another option would be a plantation shutter. The frame around the shutter would cover the trim around the window and if ordered with a "sill cap" it would even cover the window sill and the "apron" below the window. And if the shutters are made from vinyl or ABS they will withstand the water fairly well.

    Here are some I did a few years ago in a shower.
  • debd60
    8 years ago
    Are your tiles ceramic or that hard plastic tile? I painted the ceramic tiles in our basement shower stall years ago, including the shower floor. I cleaned with TSP and used an oil (alkyd) based paint and it withheld very well. You must allow it to "cure" completely. There are also many new products on the market these days, for example http://sunlitspaces.com/2013/02/26/how-to-paint-ceramic-tile/ has a few suggestions.
  • Chromatic
    8 years ago
    Pelham Shingle Style for a Modern Family · More Info
  • Chromatic
    8 years ago
    I wish I knew what this window treatment is, but it is very cool.
  • Jessica Kerry Mack
    8 years ago
    I just used frosted window film on the glass and dried the sill after each shower, but I was renting...
  • captains6
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    If anyone knows what the type of hinged, two-piece frosted glass scheme is referred to (or better yet, an online retailer that sells them), for the great photo that "sheshore" posted yesterday, I would greatly appreciate that. Thanks, sheshore, for that great photo! That would work quite well for my application, but I am having a hard time on Google finding what that item is called, and where I could purchase.
  • Christalyn
    8 years ago
    Use what ever material you want and coat it with Never Wet. See the you tube video. www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZrjXSsfxMQ.
  • PRO
    ResCom Designs
    8 years ago
    I have used a vinyl shutter in many a shower window. Since you have stated funds are an issue at this time I suggest you look at window film. Get a frosted film, apply and VOILA!! The cost is less that $30 and there are many diy install vids online
  • captains6
    Original Author
    8 years ago
    ResCom Designs,
    When you say a "vinyl shutter", are you referring to a planation-style shutter, that has all those horizontal slats? I am looking for a solution like those two hinges frosted plexi pieces, so that it would cover not only the window glass, but to cover/protect from water damage the whole wooden window casing as well. However, I just did a Google search, and could not find any $30 vinyl shutters. I would really appreciate if you could take a moment and email me a link to what you are describing. Thanks again for your time.
  • PRO
    ResCom Designs
    8 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago
    Hello Captains, The $30 reffered to the cost of window film for the glass. Plexi with hinges may not work to protect the wood as you desire. A shutter will protect all the wood on the window and help create a seal if you were to use DAP CAULK around the edges of the shutter frame.
  • Chromatic
    8 years ago
    Captains......I have learned that the covering for that window is a "tempered obscured glass panel" they attached it to the tile with shower door panel hinges. I saw a couple more of them on this site. One I saw, appeared to be able to swing open and closed to allow for the window operation. I will post those others if I can. Unfortunately, it will probably be a custom item thru your local shower door company.
  • Chromatic
    8 years ago
    http://houzz.com/photos/2362298

    Another version of the glass panel.
  • Chromatic
    8 years ago
    Captains.......I found a blog of a bathroom remodel where they had a wood window situation. She said they bought a piece of plexiglass and attached it over the window with 4 dabs of caulk to hold it in place then if it needs removing, you can just slide a razor behind the plexiglass and cut through the caulk. That would be really inexpensive. They have plexiglass at Home Depot.
  • captains6
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    imhandy,

    Thanks so much for your great suggestions. I did install a great Panasonic green-rated ventilation fan, it is a super-quiet (low scones sound rating) model that mosts guests do not even realize it is on when they visit. The switch on the wall is an auto-sensing switch, which I did for the same purpose that you mentioned ( my wife and I would remember to use it while showering, but kids/guests will be intermittent)... Regarding the window solution, I am planning on replacing the original (circa 1951) wood window with a vinyl replacement window, stripping the wood trim and replacing with vinyl trim and caulking all crevices.

  • psc4128
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    captain6

    I also have a solution. I to want to replace with vinyl window but i am currently using a frosted sheet of plexigass mounted with 4 inch rod spacers at six locations around window , a long screw is in wall with spacer than plexi with holes drilled thru and a dap of bath caulk then a decorative nut to hold all in place . the plexi is 3 inches larger than window on all sides and the spacers allow air to circulate , have had in place 4 years and not a bit of problems. spacers look like brushed rods used on cabinet handles , purchased at lowe's .light still bright in bath with privacy, cleans with a squeege and a bit of non ammonia glass cleaner. no camera working so can't send picture sorry. cost was around $125 total all from lowes. my window is exactly like yours , trim and all.

    good luck

  • captains6
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    psc81125,

    Thanks for your reply! That sounds like a cool look, but can you still access the window to open the window?

  • psc4128
    6 years ago

    not daily , in the winter in colo. I leave it closed and in the summer , I can leave it cracked a bit if I chose, and then not use the fan as often. If you wanted to see out you could use clear plexi but the frosted just makes the window frame go away

  • huiminchen
    6 years ago

    Hi all, I have the same situation and the water from shower has been deposited at the seating of the window, causing a possible water leak to downstairs through walls. I am very desperate in using psc81125's method but could not understand what she means. Is there a way to take a picture from your phone and post it? So sorry, I don't know how to do it but need to do this badly.... Thank you

  • SandyC.
    6 years ago
    Okay, so I have briefly read through this thread. I am no expert but wouldn't it be more economical to replace the wood window with a vinyl window, than to have to deal with all of the ensued damage from water leaking down walls to the floor below, mildew and the like, caused from these insane temporary "solutions". There was a reason the previous homeowners never used the shower, they had a wood window that was not water proof!
    A small vinyl window will not cost that much, way less than all the repairs caused by mildew and dry rot.
  • huiminchen
    6 years ago

    I do have vinyl windows. Vinyl windows are not the problem. The fact that water would deposit and flow to the bottom of the windows and might go down the walls is the issue. Since the water will spray to the window from the showers, these windows seating could collect water and leak to the wall (from 2nd to first floor)....

  • SandyC.
    6 years ago
    Oh, sorry, I guess I can't read. I think you need to take off all of the trim and have some tile work done.
  • Vicki Schwarz
    6 years ago

    I did some research because I was interested in Chromatic 's "Pelham Shingle Style for a Modern Family ·" From what I understand, this would be really easy to recreate. I should say to everyone though, it isn't going to be water proof, or even repellant. It will be no different really than having a pull down shade. Think of it as a cabinet door that opens from to directions out toward you (into the shower) You can buy the cabinetry hardware anywhere (the hinges) then you get two pieces of glass (frosted, or you could use something like Plasti dip Smoke, or frosted glass spray. If you cut the glass yourself make sure to sand/round the corners and use safety equipment.) Then you add handles, (or not, they are not neccacary.)

  • Vicki Schwarz
    6 years ago

    Something else that might work for people is this: Flex Seal. It seems like a gimmick but it isn't. It is a flexible rubberized coating which pretty much cover anything. It can fill in holes too which makes it a really nice thing for damaged woodwork. For those of you who have troubles with pooling water in your window sills, here is something you might want to try.... What you want is for the water to naturally come forward and go back into your bathtub, so you need to make the edge closer to the window higher than the part that drips back inside. You could accomplish this in a lot of ways, but the easiest might be to get a thin piece of vinyl or wood or whatever, and then a tiny dowel. Set the small dowel or rod down near the window and secure it. Add the flat piece of wood (cutting it from the length in from the window out to the edge) sand it flat, seal it, paint it whatever color you need it to be, then secure it in. This could be as simple as using silicon and creating a nice smooth edge. Then spray flex seal in the entire area. Over the sill, around all the edges and on the flat surface. This project shouldn't cost too much and probably can be accomplished by stuff you have around your house. If not purchasing material would cost you less than 40 dollars.

  • PRO
    MJS Designers Group
    6 years ago
    Lose all the wood trim around the window change to tile change window to fixed glass Opaque and lose blinds
  • jbtanyderi
    4 years ago
    Big box builder stores sell units which keep the integral blinds sealed.
  • captains6
    Original Author
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    This is my “5 Years Later Update” for ou 1st floor bathroom, in my original post in 2013 when I was asking suggestions about what to do with original wooden window in the bathtub.. The solution we went with is shown in the pics below, please click on each photo to see the full photo view.

    We found a true tile craftsman on Angie’s List. Amazing, high-quality work, a true artist is this tile installer. This photo was immediately after the tile was done. It also shows the new integrity by Marvin fiberglass window, with solid bright white quartz planks framing in the four sides of the window. The same quarts planks were used as the three shelves in the recessed wall nook/niche. The plumbing fixtures have since been updated with beautiful Symmons “Origins” set. The feature wall is a random 3-color flood of hexagon tile: white, gray, and “greige” (grey/beige/tan). The two sidewalls are 24“x12“ porcelain tiles in a complimentary gray, with some greige and white accents in it. We also had the original and beautiful 1951 cast iron bathtub refinished by miracle method. This bathtub (my guess is it was made by American Standard) has beautiful vintage curves in and contour lines to it that may (or may not) be a thing of the past, And it is the most fitting in ideal style for our 1951 Cape Cod style home. Please note that these photos were taken before our tile installer did the grouting, which was done with "Natural Gray" epoxy grout made by Laticrete, and the the grey color of the grout is AMAZING.

    Old window removed.

    New window in, time to demo pink tile down to studs!

    “My, how studly!”

    Hardie tile backer board installed, all seams taped/mudded, then all painted with Redguard waterproof paint.

    Detail of the recessed nook/niche. The sides are the bull nose version of the 24x12 tiles, and the four white horizontal pieces are the same bright white quartz planks used to frame in the new window.

    It took a while for us to figure out what to do with this bathroom, but now we could not be happier. The only thing that was outsourced was the install of the tile, and connecting water lines of the new shower fixtures which required the plumbing in the wall to be changed.

  • Eva Gonzalez
    4 years ago

    We have a window in our shower. I buy a vinyl shower curtain that come all sort of designs. I measure my window and how far down I want to go. I cut the shower curtain to fit my window that is in the shower. I put up a rod and use the shower hooks. I am able to cover the whole window with the curtains. once they look kind of worn I buy another curtain.

  • Melissa Littrell
    3 years ago

    Looks fabulous! Perfect solution for our upcoming project. Thank you for sharing the photos along with the written description of how you solved the “problem” window a shower dilemma!

  • Jim Williams
    3 years ago

    I would love to see if anyone has preserved a historic double hung window in the bathroom that will be in the shower and how they might have kept it. The curtain seems like a solution. Anyone used a custom made glass piece hinged to access the window? Looking for ideas. Scrapping the window is not an option.


  • Cal Walters
    last year

    We are in the process of preserving a wooden window with diamond glass panels. Water abatement is my highest priority. We have an added problem that the shower window will face the street! Mid project as I write. We will be using many of the double waterproofing underlay ideas discussed below and then multiple coats of the red guard. We are choosing subway tiles with bull nose edge on the lower edge of the sill, that will be sloped inward towards the pan. Even though the rest of the shower will have bullnose at the seams, this are will be invisible - as described shortly. On the top edge of the window, we are building out a slight tile flare - again with the bullnose edged tiles - so that any water getting this far - or any condensation will be carried away from the window and won't have the tendency to roll under the corner caused by using quarter rounds. Finally, tucked under this flare we will have 2 - 1/2" pins with end fittings to hang a sheet of 1/4" tempered & sandblasted glass with a silicon edge seal to minimize tile bumping and improve water movement away from the windows. At least this is the plan now.


  • felizlady
    last year

    You need to thoroughly waterproof the entire wood window. Then I would suggest a heavily-patterned frosted plastic window-film for privacy. Once you install it, you should check from outside to see if it gives enough privacy with the lights on. If it isn’t, you can add the waterproof shutters or blinds. Of the bottom of the window is at shoulder heigh, the window film may be enough.

  • btydrvn
    last year

    We have a rod with a curtain in the back of our shower as well as in the front...for different reasons but it has worked perfectly for 20 years...just close both curtains when showering..open up the rest of the time

  • btydrvn
    last year

    The two brown poles are for shower curtain front and back ....the front rod is for decorative drapery panels..that do not close...the curtains hide behind the panels so they can be basic just functional panels

  • cameronpage
    7 months ago

    Hey Cal Walters, how did your project turn out? I'm trying to do the same thing, save a wooden window that is in a shower and it's very tricky, those old wooden windows just aren't the same as the new vinyl ones. Tips?