conifers_gw

Harbor Freight Greenhouse Assembly

conifers
14 years ago

Harbor Freight Greenhouse Assembly

Step 1

Parts #rd 34 (2) The longer pieces on Bottom of frame

Part # 16 Left (Back of Greenhouse) of Bottom Frame

Part # 17 Right (Front of Greenhouse) of Bottom Frame

Parts #1 (2) Standing Upright (Looking in from where your door will be) in Opposite Corners: Front Left and Back Right

Parts # 29 (2) (Looking in from where your door will be) Standing Upright in Opposite Corners: Front Right and Back Left

Note: All bolts were "hand tightened" in the beginning and will all be fully tightened later.

{{gwi:299035}}

Step 2

Image shows how Romex wire was brought into the Greenhouse. A channel was hand chiseled and silicone caulked. Depending on how you decide to build your wooden base, etc. results will vary. This is how I chose to build mine.

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Step 3

Upper side rail gutters have been installed (2) # 36s. All bolts are still being hand tightened.

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Step 4

Part # 21 attached to # 29 and # 1 on back wall of greenhouse. The flange is on the inside of the frame with the flanged "lip" being on the bottom.

{{gwi:299038}}

Step 5

YouÂll be installing (6) # 10Âs. They will bolt to the bottom frame as shown in the first photo and they will be secured using the T-bolts on the top of your frame (part # 36) by sliding them into the channel located on each # 10. ***VERY IMPORTANT*** at this point youÂre going to need to slide an extra T-Bolt into four of you # 10Âs before tightening up the T-bolt on your # 36Âs. This extra T-bolt will later be used to attach to your cross bracing supports #Âs 22 (4). This is a step not mentioned in the directions. The next series of photos will show all of this.

img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v280/Cultivar/Harbor%20Freight%20Greenhouse%20Assembly/HarborFreightGreenhouseAssembly005.jpg">;

{{gwi:299039}}

HereÂs showing one of the cross braces and why you slid the extra T-bolt in. The next Photo will show you which of the # 10 pieces to slide the extra T-bolt into.

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(Showing which # 10Âs the extra T-bolt was slid into for future task of assembling the braces (# 22Âs))

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Step 6

Photo of pieces # 8 and # 9 installed left to right repectively on back side of greenshouse. These are the two long pieces standing upright. We tied a temporary string to hold the front uprights together at this point.

{{gwi:299042}}

Step 7

It was at this time we decided to secure the frame to the floor of greenhouse. You may want to use your own judgement as to when this step is necessary, however we realized at this time we needed to secure the Frame to the wooden base.

**Note** Had we secured the frame to the base in the very beginning as the instructions recommend, we would have to undone it and done it all over again. We used Pan Phillips Zince 10 x ½ with Zinc Flat Washers # 10 to secure it. The aluminum is pre-drilled but not the wooden base.

Now that the frame is secured to the wooden base itÂs now time to "using a level" go back and make sure it is all square and then go back and tighten every bolt.

{{gwi:299043}}

Step 8

Front diagonal braces (2) # 25Âs are secured to front of greenhouse which at this point really stiffens up the entire thing.

**Note** After these braces are put on, the Front ALSO should be square. We had a temporary piece of string holding the front together. At this time our temporary rope was removed. The entire frame is extremely rigid at this point.

{{gwi:299044}}

Step 9

ThereÂs a lot going on hereÂ

(2) # 23Âs and # 6 and # 7 are going to be attached. BOTH # 23Âs will be attached FLANGE UP AND FACING OUTSIDE. For #6 and #7 youÂll need to attach them by undoing the bottom bolts on the cross slants and by securing #6 and #7 respectively from RIGHT to LEFT. Photo shows this work as being finished.

{{gwi:299045}}

Step 10

YouÂll be installing (4) # 13 parts. (2) will be installed in the front and (2) will be installed in the back. The first photo shows how these parts are attached to the front and the second shows how they are attached on the back. They fit in conjunction to the pitch of the roof in each corner.

{{gwi:299046}}

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Step 11

(Preparing "Crown Beam" part # 35 with (6) # 11Âs). ***NOTE*** At this time again, youÂll need to slide an extra T-bolt into two of your #11Âs. The #11Âs that needs the extra T-bolt are the ones being used for your pop up vent. See illustration Page 5 Figure B for exact placement.

These series of photos show a generic illustration of how the Crown Beam and itÂs componets are attached.

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{{gwi:299049}}
{{gwi:299050}}

Step 12

Photo of completed roof frame.

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Step 13

This is a photo of the CROWN BEAM in the FRONT of the GREENHOUSE. This Photo shows the channel in which part # 33 slides in. Part # 33 is the louvering mechanism for your pop up vent. See illustration Page 5 Figure B for further visual understanding.

{{gwi:299052}}

Step 14

(Not a good photo). This shows how the pop up vent is put together using parts #30 (2) which are held together by part # 32 (bottom of vent).

{{gwi:299053}}
HereÂs another photo showing the same thing I just took.

{{gwi:299054}}

Step 15

The next two photos show the installation of part # 15 and the very small part # 18 which will screw into part # 15. These photos will also show part # 51 and how it is installed.

#15 will attach between your (2) # 11Âs that you EARLIER (damn these instructions!) slid the extra T-bolts into. Then of course youÂll attach part # 18 as shown. Part #18 is what holds the louver arm.

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And another view

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Step 16

Part # 12 will be attached first to the holes between the top of the door frame in order to mount the door track, piece # 14. Part # 14 mounts to piece # 12 with slide in T-bolts. Part # 12 was attached first.

Photo taken from above after both parts were installed.

{{gwi:299058}}

Step 17

Installing part # 14 (Long Bar that connects to part # 19) Part # 19 was installed first. Two photos illustrate how this installation looks.

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And a close up of Part # 19 as to how it is secured (Photo detail of # 19).

{{gwi:299060}}

DOOR ASSEMBLY

Using Sheet Metal Screws (packet #44) screw directly into the allotted channel for each frame piece. Going from top of door to bottom.

Photos going from top to bottom

#24 which is underneath # 31 (I missed a photo but youÂll just have to figure out what I mean by saying #24 is UNDERNEATH # 31)

#26

#26

#27

#20 on LEFT SIDE

#28 on RIGHT SIDE

Photos:

This photo shows Top of Door. Part #31 on top of #24 (#24 is put on first)

{{gwi:299061}}
This photo shows left side of door (#20) 2 sheet metal screws holding #31 to #20.

{{gwi:299062}}

This photo shows both parts #26

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These next two photos shows part #27 from the front and from the side. NOTE: This is the only part of all of the door parts that only is held in place with one sheet metal screw per side (see photo).

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Photo of Completed Frame With Door

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PANELS

We taped them (temporarily) on the inside to various parts of the frame and panel as needed to draw the frame and panel together then every panel was silicone caulked (clear silicone) from the outside. Just as a note, I used 9 tubes in total. You can use whatever kind of silicone you like but I went for the 50-year stuff. IÂll remove the tape tomorrow. HereÂs my finished product.

{{gwi:299069}}

I hope this makes life easier for many of you.

Dax

Comments (45)

  • javan
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wonderful pictures and instructions. I wish I had had them before I built mine. It was an adventure. Thanks again; you will save many people some aggravation. Jim

  • milwdave
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi Dax,

    Your photos are GREAT! Thanks for posting them. Did you find it as difficult as people said it was to put it together?

    Dave
    Milwaukee

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  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dave,

    My Dad and I took our sweet, sweet time. We worked from 9:00 a.m. Thursday till 4:00 pm and had the entire structure built at this point except for the door. We of course had to take apart things and add T-bolts and on and on so by the time 4 o'clock came around my Dad who is in his mid-sixties was both frustrated and tired.

    Yesterday was a breeze. The door became noticibaly clear to us that it had to be screwed together with the sheet metal screws which not a mention is published in the directions, and we had some difficulty figuring out how the track, Piece # 24 was to be attached. Fortunately by that time, there weren't too many pieces left so that eventually got sorted out somewhat quickly.

    All I can say is a person has to be somewhat mechanically inept to put this thing together. Both my father and myself joking commented on occasion about how people who might not have put very many things together in their life might never of gotten this damn thing built. This little project could be understood by "anyone" as being of their worst of nightmares.

    I am now however the proud owner of my own greenhouse and I couldn't have done it without your guysis help and suggestions! There's a lot of thought that goes into a project such as this prior to building and some of it I definitely overlooked. So thanks again.

    Many thanks...

    Sincerely,

    Dax

    Check out this good looking guy.
    {{gwi:306952}}

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'll add one more comment to all of you. We decided that a piece of wood should be fastened underneath part #17 and to the wooden base.. (The bottom track for the door)..so that just in case anybody ever decided to step on that "overhanging" aluminum track, the lumber would act as a support for it.

    As I mentioned before, this thing can be built a number of ways and should be modified at times to suit an individuals needs. As in my case where the track could very easily be bent, we just knew that adding "something" would "improve upon" an already well done job.

    Thanks again Milwaukee Dave and all.

    Best Regards,

    Dax

  • milwdave
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Just a quick note on the door tracks....if your door is sticky use some silicone grease, not spray, on all the track surfaces. The door will slide much easier.

    I see they changed the construction of part 27...mine has a black insert that attaches the door to the track of part 17....hmmmmm.

    Dave
    Milwaukee

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Well that makes sense Dave.
    I suppose that's why there are two holes per side on the bottom of that piece. My door does work well however. I'll take a look and fix it. Other than that I think I'm pretty well dialed.

    Thanks,
    Dax

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Thanks for the tip Dave.

    I was gone all day and my dad stopped over to take a look at that door and after he removed it from the track he decided the silicone beefened that thing up on its own. Furthermore, in order to get that little plastic part in there we would have had to remove the siliconed panel. It's good to go in other words.

    Thanks again though.
    Dax

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I thought I'd show my conifer set-up. Also, I found a great heater that you can set the desired temp as low as 45 degrees F and it automatically has built in a "Frost Watch" that turns it on if the temps ever drop to 44 degrees F. Charley's greenhouse sells this 'Safe Heater' for 99 bucks but I was able to find the same exact heater for 59 bucks. (I'll provide a link).

    For Conifer Grafts I have the enclosed poly structure and after they "pushed" and shown significant growth...I have the back benches for them to continue the cycle. I'm also using the back benches for deciduous grafts and for growing my seedling understock. The benches were purchased at my nearby Lowe's Home Improvment Center and stand 18" tall by 18" wide by 36 or 37.5" long. I also was able to purchase a crate of real nice sturdy nursery flats in a bundle of 25 for 39 bucks including shipping. The flats are 17" x 13" and fit perfectly on/in both my benches and my conifer grafting structure...and they fit snugly between the boards running along the top of my conifer structure should I ever choose to do other things besides grafted conifers underneath in the sandy area. All and all I couldn't be happier.

    Here's the photos first and then the link to the heater.
    Dax

    {{gwi:306954}}

    {{gwi:306955}}

    {{gwi:305955}}

    Lots of room to move around too!

  • Vamptoo
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dax,

    What a great job you have done. A big rasberry to those who think we can't have fun in our HFGH's. LOL

    Thanks for the link to the Heater. I'll show it to DH tonight.

    Cindy

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Thanks Vamptoo!

    "What do those chumps know anyways!!!"

    Harbor Freight, Harbor Freight!!

    Take care,

    Dax

  • elle8b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dax
    What a great set of photos and instructions. I put mine up last year, but for all those future HFGH owners I say Thank You.
    elle

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'm not on this forum much so if it should happen that this thread vanishes into the archives...I've saved this step-by-step assembly as a Word Document and I can paste it again at anytime.
    Maybe my gardenweb name "conifers" will be easy for some of you to remember.

    Thanks guys and thanks for everybody elses help that also helped guide me along.

    Dax

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I need to follow up on this thread because I've learned again that I was terribly wrong about something. For those of you who might be using (2) heaters on a standard 120 Volt outlet you ***must be aware*** that the total "load" in terms of Amperage that a 20 Amp Circuit Breaker can handle is only 16 Amps. And really you need to be below the 16 Amps for the heater to run continuously. I learned a valuable lesson today.

    In my climate (Zone 5) I'll need two seperate outlets at a rating of 120 Volts each respectively in order for me to run Two heaters that use 1500Watts each potentially.

    So if you don't understand any of this, be sure that you get the needed information from somebody (there's a thread currently running) so that you can be ***darn sure*** that you're greenhouse can be heated properly.

    Had I not learned what I did today...my world of conifer grafting would have gone kaput at some point.

    Dax

  • agardenstateof_mind
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dax, we can't thank you enough for the photos. Oldest son started on the GH assembly this morning; at 1:50 the frame is complete and he's working on the door! No panels in yet, as we decided to complete the frame, place it on the 2x10 foundation, make any necessary adjustments, then put in the panels.

    I helped a little, but he's really carried it and I think he's just about made record time, thanks to your photos and descriptions, and everyone else's experiences, too. Our only problem has been that my printer's not working ... so we had to keep running in from the yard to check the site ... lol ... dog must think we're nuts ... this is where wireless would come in handy!

    I'm wondering how soon I can move a chair and table in there without looking like a complete fool :-)

    Ken & Sue in Glassboro ... how are you doing with yours?

    Thanks again, everyone.

    Diane

  • shipp53
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    couldn't have done it without you dax well may we could have but it would have taken a lot longer
    thanks

  • agardenstateof_mind
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Trying to get it ready for colder weather now, and searching for info on sealing any gaps and especially installing a solar pool cover. Specifically, how does one vent this with the cover on? If anyone can direct me to the right thread, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks!

  • morrowsmowers
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Our 15 year old started the frame and stopped, thinking I had to build the wood foundation first -- he is away at a friends for a few days -- we want to do the frame first to be sure the 2 x 12 foundation is a perfect fit and then we will attach it to the base, put in the panels, etc. Hoping to have it done within the next week.

    Ken & Sue in Glassboro, NJ

  • agardenstateof_mind
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wonderful that your 15-year-old was willing to take that on! I wish my 16-year-old twins had more interest, though they're beginning to show a little more now that it's up. Surely some great science experiment possibilities there. (At least one of the gh distributor sites has a special section for schools, including project material for classroom use ... worth checking out if a science project is assigned.)

    We ended up doing the same: completing the frame then setting it on the foundation. We found the 1/2 x 1 inch strips the directions called for were unnecessary. We did put a layer of foam insulation between the foundation and frame - both to help seal any gaps and prevent a chemical reaction between the aluminum and treated lumber. Those 2x12's are going to make a world of difference for you! It's amazing how much the panels do to firm up the frame.

    I wish I could come up with some new hints or tips to share, but nothing yet.

    I've got a few things moved in there, even though the shelves aren't finished yet, so hope I can get it tightened up before Thursday night's predicted 29 degrees.

    Good luck on completing the gh - it's fun when it really begins to take shape!

  • roxy77
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dax,

    A million thank you's for posting this. We would not have made it through the day without it. It only took us from 9am to 3pm to get it up, it would have taken a whole weekend with out it.

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!

    Roxy and her Fiance

    Now we just have to get the floor figured out and get the benches in. But I need a nap first, phew!

  • conifers
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    You're welcome guys!

    Good stories here.

    Best Regards,

    Dax

  • jimmydo2
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I love the Benches/tables you picked up at lowes.. They would be perfect for my greenhouse. Are they actualy Benches, Tables or shelves? I was wondering where in Lowes I should look for them.

  • domeman
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I keep seeing comments such as ..............

    CAUTION - BONDING AND COMPATIBILITY (all laminates containing polycarbonate)

    * Certain sealants and adhesives may not be compatible with the polycarbonate material. Crazing of polycarbonate may result when improper adhesive or sealant materials are in contact with, or close to the polycarbonate, edges and surfaces included. Edge sealants applied by Saint-Gobain Sully on glass edges are not a protection against non-compatible sealants and adhesives. As a consequence, avoid any direct contact between the gluing sealant and the polycarbonate.

    Perhaps the 'correct' sealant needs to be used.

  • mraroid
    14 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    How do you post pictures in your message?

  • mikeschn
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'm gonna start putting my 6x8 HFGH up this weekend. I'll try to get lots of pics too. If anyone needs anything special, let me know...

    Mike...

  • mikeschn
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Got the HFGH up this weekend. Turned out nice. The 6x8 is the perfect size. The photo shoot started out good enough, but then the rains came... Yes, we continued in the rain... I'm so glad we did, cause the next two nights were really cold...

    Here's how it fits into our yard...

    {{gwi:306957}}

    Now to dig out that Solar Greenhouse book and figure out how to store that thermal energy.

    Mike...

  • belleville_rose_gr
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    i just ordered this greenhouse and can't thank you enough for step by step instructions. One question i have is do you need to caulk in the panels or was just a step you took to seal in the panels. where about in illinois do you live?

  • conifers
    Original Author
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I don't know. I didn't read about it or ask before doing the caulking. I just assumed I wanted that thing airtight and rigid. Rigid being first.

    I caulked it inside and out I believe.

    I'm in Rock Island, IL.

    Glad to be of help:):)

    Dax

  • belleville_rose_gr
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    well my gh kit arrived but now having a icy weekend so will wait till the weather clears. i have the base built so just need assembly. I live in Belleville 20 miles east of st.louis mo

  • emtnest
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Oh My Gosh.... my daughter and I have been assembling our HF 10'X12' greenhouse and what a job...Have been working on it for a couple of weekends..have the frame up and now have to do the doors and windows... all of the pictures on here have been a help, plus I had to make a call to the 800 number and they emailed me more pics to help with assembly.I think they change up things from time to time because some of the directions didn't add up...in fact their directions are HORRIBLE. If anyone needs me to take a pic of any area email me and I will. Dottie

  • funnylady
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I Have 3 HFGH's 2--10X12, 1--6X8. Love them all and had no problem putting any of them together by myself. Husband thought that I was crazy for wanting greenhouses in FL but it gets cold here in the winter. I grow tomatoes, green peppers and egg plant all winter. I also start seed in Feb so I don't have to buy from garden supplies here. I spend to much money that way. I start abot 2000 plants every year. Give alot of them away to friends.
    Love you greenhouses and don't know what I ever did without them. I'm now retired so I have all the time in the world to be out ther doing what I love.

  • wayne_nc
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    new flyer from Harbor Freight list a 10X12 greenhouse on sale for 599.00 down from 719.00 thru 02/26/2007.

    Is this the best price I am likely to find ?

  • mollyd
    13 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wayne,

    They offer this price almost every month. In the past year I have yet to see anything else.

    MollyD

  • imqtpi
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dax/Conifers...

    I just wanted to say "You Rock!!!" for putting this post up on GW!

    (Plus, I want to keep this thread "active" for any other GH Newbies tackling this project!)

    We've *almost* completed construction of my 6x8 HFGH (it's only taken 2 months!!!). Prior to starting construction, I printed up HFGH's instructions *AND* your illustrated instructions. I went back-and-forth between the two print-outs throughout construction (Yours - without a doubt - were FAR better!!!).

    Anyway... I just wanted to post a most sincere "THANK YOU" for posting this!!! I can't even begin to tell you how helpful it was!!!

    -Nancy (aka imqtpi)

  • milwdave
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Yes Nancy, Dax's are the best.:)

    Dave
    Milwaukee

  • conifers
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Dave, you're still the rage of freestyle HF greenhouse construction. I give you an 88.3 for uncorking the mystery of why constuction tools will be less associated with the art of the so-called woman and soon to be more associated with the woman's perception of taking over 'the man's world' wearing tool belts, spitting in puddles, and drinking beer from a bottle. I'm thinking man in bikini sporting gold necklace and grey hair. The good ole' boys...

    Of course, my father has always taught me to be think before I rush into any project and I think that is relatively easy to see exactly that this step-by-step ordeal came out real good and that also this greenhouse came out beautifully.

    Nancy, I'm proud to add to the "manual" to help these idiots re-invent the written language and to dot all the "i's" and cross all the "t's" for them! hahaha - hehehe - hohoho! Plus I'm glad there's a greenhouse that anyone can afford, poor or rich for that matter, and that we all get a glimpse of the good life.

    Our health is # 1!

    Dax

  • laurriebasiletti_msn_com
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I am saving this link as I am about to order my first HFGH and want to thank Dax for the wonderful instructions! I know I will be referring to these quite often when I get started

    Laurrie

  • jcampa
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi! I have a 6x8 that I am putting together right now, but first thing that I've had trouble with is the frame size that the greenhouse sits on. In the instructions the measurements are 75x971/2 but its actually somthing like 75x 99 or so.... did anyone have this sort of problem????? Or did I do something wrong? As many have already said the instructions that comes with the greenhouse are truly horrible!!!!

  • greenhouser
    12 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    The size is off a few inches. We had to add a 2X4 at one end. The instructions are awful.

  • kellyb_ec_rr_com
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi Dax,

    My husband and I built this greenhouse two weeks ago. Last night we had a storm and it blew out 8 panels, two are gone. Any suggestions and where to go to replace them and have you found a way to make a greenhouse wind proof?

    Thanks,
    Kelly

  • ang16505
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi all - just found this site and wanted it to stay up a while longer... If I would have had these instructions when I put up my 10 by 12 HFGH - it would have saved a lot of headaches for my husband. However, it has been up for over 2 years now (nasty winters included). I still love it!!! We have it heated with natural gas - a little pricy this past winter, but my plants don't like the cold! lol Anyway, during the winter we completely cover the GH with painter's clear drop cloth. It helps hold in the heat. Also, I didn't seal it with silicone, and not once did any panels blow away. I guess I'm lucky for that. Also, this winter I "insulated" it with bubble wrap. I also use old fish tanks and fill them with water to contain the heat from the sun during the day. Not too sure if that helps, but it doesn't get too cold in there, so I'm not going to get rid of them any time soon. As for getting replacement panels, can you try to contact the company (if you haven't already) to get new ones from them?

    Happy planting all!!! Angie

  • chuck60
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    It might be that I should start a new thread, but since I am asking about HF greenhouses, here goes:

    I have a south-facing brick wall of a shed I would like to use as part of a greenhouse structure. It is 22 feet long but only 8 feet high, and the roof is a 2/10 pitch. In looking for materials to use, I found this and other threads that indicate the HF greenhouses are about the best buy going. I was wondering if I could split a 10x12 and make a 5x20 lean-to greenhouse. I figure I'd have to change the roof pitch and probably find some extra aluminum H channel, but even so the price for equivalent components might make this a viable option. Anyone done something similar?

    Chuck

  • mudhouse_gw
    11 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hi Chuck,
    I love my HFGH 10x12, but I think splitting it in two to make a 5x20 lean-to would require a huge amount of rethinking and re-engineering. The roof pitch in the kit is predetermined by angle brackets at the corners, and by a formed angle in the framing piece at the top of the side wall; I don't think you could use that major component if you changed the roof pitch. The framework really doesn't lend itself to cutting the structure in two as far as critical bracing. Not saying it couldn't be done (anything is possible for hard workers!) but personally my husband and I think you'd be better off to consider building your own structure (which would allow you to go wider than 5' if you wanted.) It's nice you will have a solid structure to anchor to.

    I now know the twinwall polycarbonate panels that come with the HFGH kits will not last more than a few years in my own sunny climate, due to (in my opinion) a lack of UV protection, even though HF continues to advertise otherwise. The panels represent a huge part of the value of the kit, since true UV protected twinwall polycarbonate is expensive, so I now advise folks to take this into consideration, depending on climate, when they consider the kit.

    Some of the close-up photos in my blog may help you see what I mean about the pre-formed angles in the aluminum framing at the GH corners: Mudhouse blog for 10x12 HFGH

    Also, here's a link to a helpful site with many links to info about building your own greenhouse: Free plans for building greenhouses and solar spaces

    I also agree, I'd encourage you to start a new thread to get more opinions from other folks...lots of folks here more knowledgeable than me, and some of these older threads with many slow-to-load pics get skipped by folks who might be very helpful to you.
    Sheri

  • mighty_turf
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    My question is I just put together a 10x12 HFGH. I need to install panels and some homemade supports but I must be blind. I have on the front doors rubbers pieces that are flapping around a foot long like extra rubber. I can't see where this is supposed to go?? They are attached to pieces number 33, They have a slot in them like they are to slide on something. Need a little help on this.
    Also, where do you buy your Bayliss openers for the roof?
    thanks, Ken

  • mudhouse_gw
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hello Ken, I just sent you an email also, but will do a shorter reply here in case you see this first.

    It's been over 8 years since we built our Harbor Freight 10x12, but your question made me remember that I had maybe 3-4" extra inches of black rubber door gasket, extending past the top edge of the door. The door gasket is only supposed to be the same length as the door. It forms one vertical strip, top to bottom, and when it's in place properly, it will match the door frame exactly. No excess at top or bottom.

    This will sound odd, but I have a memory of simply wiggling and "walking back" the excess gasket into the groove, without have to trim off any excess. I just kept compressing and moving it back, until it all fit.

    It's better to do this than to cut off much excess, because over time, the rubber gasket may shrink a bit. Mine have, after 8 years of exposure to our very hot summers. They now stop a bit shy of both the top and bottom of the doors, but they used to be exactly level with the top and bottom. So, see if you can "walk back" the extra gasket, before you trim off any extra. Hope this helps.

  • DarrellRG
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Do you know if there is anything that would prohibit me from moving the base frame back on the 4x4 base so the front plate does not hang out over the edge? In your picture i do not see anything on the bottom of the door on the 6x8 GH that hooks underneath. The pics on the 10x12 model show a little black hook (part #51). I do not see a similar piece for the 6x8 model.