crystalgeorgia

care for curry leaf plant

crystalgeorgia
15 years ago

I have this curry leaf plant ( also called curry patha). I have it in this small pot which around 4-5 inches.

Should I move it to a bigger pot?

Also how long can i keept it outdoors? in zone 8.

any other care tips.

Thanks.

Comments (77)

  • ramguru
    11 years ago

    Thank you for the suggestion Padma_2009 and sorry to hear that you lost your plant. I was planning to let the plant recover first in the current pot while giving it my generous Neem treatment and then repot it in a week or two if I still have the option left which I am hoping I do.

    When I do, I will be sure to give it some B1 and rooting hormone along with plenty of compost to help it settle in.

    I just returned from my yard having removed all the mature infected branches and giving the hole plant a careful wipe down with cotton balls soaked in rubbing alcohol followed by a wash in cool tepid water and a second treatment of Neem. The plant still has some new sprouting leaflets which I hope will help it and put it on the path to recovery.

    Fingers crossed! and toes too. Hope to post some updated pictures.

  • padma_2009
    11 years ago

    Hi Ramguru,

    Wish u all the luck. I know how difficult it is to get a curry leaf plant :)
    I managed to get another one just a week ago..Yay.. This plant is just 6" in height.
    The last one was in a pot and the drain holes in the pot were blocked when it rained for a week and the root rot set so I tried to change the pot. My bad!!!!
    Padma

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    10 years ago

    I am new to gardening and the curry leaf plant is going to be the first attempt.. I wanted to know if this plant would require lots of sunlight? I live in houston, tx and my apartment is placed in such a way that there is no direct sunlight even in the balcony.
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  • jjay65
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    hello all!
    new member and new to house plants. i was given three curry plants by a friend and they have lasted 18 months, growing about 12 inches. it is spring now, and suddenly the largest of them is starting to shed branches and leaves, and some brown spots (insects?) are visible on the stem and some dark spots on the leaves. can anybody help with this? i have tried spraying with lukewarm soap water and it has not helped. they are currently potted and indoors with access to indirect sunlight afternoons and evenings. the spots are similar to the ones posted in the image above by ramguru but i do not have an ant problem. will post pics once i figure out how to. thanks...

  • nostalgian
    10 years ago

    Hi :

    I have been really having hard time to get a curry leaf plant. Does somebody have spare seeds or a plant that they can send. I have mustard and carom seed plant to exchange.

    I am in MD

    Thanks

  • donbon
    10 years ago

    I purchased 6 curry plants from Mountain Valley Growers.Four are for me and two are for a friend.The smell that these give off is wonderful.Can I keep them inside rather than planting them outside? And also what type of fertilizer for indoor plants.I have already transplanted them to a gallon container.I only water them when they feel a little dry.Thank you for any suggestions.They will be greatley appreciated

  • indu_modali
    10 years ago

    Nostalgian
    I live in Bowie, Maryland. I have curry leaf plants growing in pots. I can afford to give you seeds(fruits) in early fall or whenever they are ready to be planted. They definitely sprout very well. If you can afford to pick them up from me, I can give them. Only one plant I let the seeds grow. I cannot mail them. Pl email me at indumodali@hotmail.com. Thank you...Indu Modali

  • meisocal
    10 years ago

    I have a curry leaf tree that toward the end of winter and the beginning of spring, it was infested by mites because it had been watered too much. Additionally, at the end of last summer, I figured out that the growing buds had to be pinched to force the sprouting of branches.

    The mites have since left, and the pinching has initiated the sprouting of actual branches with leaves and flowers; however, the lower branches with leaves look pathetic. Will the tree eventually grow lower complex branches (not leaves branches)? Should I remove the lower leaves?

    I purchased the tree when it was about 6" tall. Now it's about 2 feet tall. I have owned the plan about 1 year. I live in inland southern california with a mediterranean climate for most of the year with the summers reaching as high as 100F. Would it be recommended that I transplant the tree into the ground or should I wait until next year? I currently have it growing in at 18" pot.

    Please help.

  • markj99999
    10 years ago

    I just want to reiterate what others have said about this plant liking it HOT. I live near the beach in southern California, and it's never very hot, nor very cold. I bought a curry leaf plant from Logees, and it arrived very healthy. I gradually moved it outside, where it did NOTHING in our 70F days. No growth, no wilting, nothing. Like suspended animation, for months.
    So, I decided to move it back indoors, into our glass solarium which gets very hot (+90F) during the day. And it took off, growing like crazy. It tripled in size in 2 months.

    So, yeah, Curry Leaf tress like it HOT!

  • meisocal
    10 years ago

    Just to report back. Since we are having a mild summer in comparisson to last year, the curry tree that I have has now taken off because the heat is here. It has even flowered and little berries are growing. Maybe I can have some seeds to plant this year.

    Does anyone know if it would be better for me to transplant into a larger pot at the end of this hot season or whether I should wait until it gets hot next summer. Additionally, how do you know when the tree needs transplanting. The pot is starting to look dwarfed in comparisson to the height of the tree.

  • seedssun
    9 years ago

    Hello,

    Do you have Curry leaf seeds?
    Do you have any other Asian/Indian veg seeds? We can exchange.

    thanks

  • nancy_lam2010_gmail_com
    9 years ago

    Hi, I really would love to get one curry plant and one pandan leaf plant. i am new to this country and I live in orlando, Florida....any one got any ideas please?

  • Ranidevi
    8 years ago

    I just joined the forum. I had a curry leaf plant for over 10 years � 5 feet tall, every year I would get at least 20-30 small plants stemming from the roots that I would give away. No deer problem, but �dear� problem; friends visiting would walk around the yard and happily break a branch without my knowledge because it really looks so flourishing. However, now for the past 7 years I have been going to India most of the time (building an ashram www.ranidevi.com) and although I had appointed people to water and take care of the plants, slowly all my plants began dying.

    Is there anyone out there that can spare one? Perhaps in exchange for some other perennial. Last year I tried my hand with Tulasi � put the 3 different varieties in a pot and gave to several friends. I live in Maryland and can pick up. You can email me at nurtureindia@yahoo.com.

  • Panna
    8 years ago

    Hi

    I have curry leaves plant from last 4/5 months. 2 week back I foung some leaves have turn black. And also found some kind of infestation on the stem and on back side of leaf it looks like small yellow / brown eggs or insects
    please see in the picture

    And advise me something to get rid of it

    thanks in advance

  • bumblebees_mom
    8 years ago

    Panna, that looks like te start of a scale infestation, you need to carefully wipe the bumps off with a cotton ball soaked in rubbing alcohol. You can then use neem oil or horticultural oil sprays to keep it under control. This is a common problem when you have to bring plants in for the winter.

  • meisocal
    8 years ago

    Major cause of this problem is not enough air circulation form the humidity coming off the damp soil. After you ensure all the leaves are cleaned off, I place it near a heater vent if you have forced air heating and also lay off watering so often. When you bring it in during winter months, it's almost in suspended animation unless you keep your house at 80F.

  • shaanp
    7 years ago

    Lots of curry leaf plants. If you live in Southern California, email me. I don't ship them out. You have to come and pick them up.
    johnpetersusa@yahoo.com

    This post was edited by shaanp on Sat, Jul 6, 13 at 13:08

  • laknarasim
    7 years ago

    Hi all,

    I live in Phoenix,Arizona, extreme hot weather during summers - 110-120. I just got a curry plant from LA, its been two weeks. Being september mid , i left the plant outside last night , i found black tips in the leaves, and the leaves also started to fall. I do not see any insect on the plant or leaves. Why has the leaves turned black on tips. Since Arizona being extreme hot weather during summers, do i need to get the plant indoor during summers too ? Also what is the proper time and way of watering the plant?

  • melea
    7 years ago

    I live in Alaska. My curry leaf plant lives indoors and is about to go into it's second winter. Last year it lost all its leaves and then sprouted new ones. It looks as if it is going to lose it's leaves again. Is this normal or is it stressed? I would also like to harvest it's leaves if it is about to lose them all. Would it further stress the plant if I harvested it's leaflets?

  • cara353
    7 years ago

    In response to Laknarasim, I too noticed dark tips on my curry leaf plant after I had moved it to a permanent location outside my house - see photo. These are not from mold or insects. We had a couple of chilly nights (low 40's one night and high 40's the next) I covered it the first night, but left it uncovered the second and I believe that the dark tips are it's reaction to being too cold. So it will be bundled up now if we go below 50F! From what people here say, it seems to like really hot weather, and it does go dormant in cooler weather. They do best in sandyish soil (like Florida has) regular potting soil can be too moist for them. So far no flowers or berries and I am going on year 4.

  • sopjac
    6 years ago

    Does anyone know if this picture is a Gamthi variety of curry leaf plant.

  • sopjac
    6 years ago

    This plant is the slowest growing curry leaf tree I have. I have a dwarf and several regular ones, but this one is odd, because leaves color is different and slow growing...

  • shaanp
    6 years ago

    Curry leaf plants in my backyard grown from seeds. I live in San Bernardino, California. email me if you are interested.

  • shaanp
    6 years ago

    More pictures of curry leaf plant.

  • wsmano
    6 years ago

    Asian Curry plants for sale. Please ring on 97760494 if you are in Melbourne.

  • wsmano
    6 years ago

    Please ignore earlier message

  • farm96744
    6 years ago

    Just picked up this little tree from my local nursery. Lots of flowers and buds. Should I hold off repotting? What potting mix would work best? Does anyone use foliage pro on their curry leaf tree?

    This post was edited by farm96744 on Tue, Mar 4, 14 at 1:00

  • natkat
    6 years ago

    Hello,
    I am planning to get 1 or more curry leaf plants (murraya koeniigi) for medicinal and culinary purposes.

    Question: I have read the plant likes sandy soil and dislikes getting "soggy". I will grow in pots ⦠should I use succulent potting mix? Or recommendations on best soil mix for potted curry plant?

    Also I have read the plant dislikes being re-potted. So do you suggest to pot in a 5 or 10 gallon to make sure it has room to grow? I live in an area with HOT DRY summers and 27 degree winters ⦠so plan to have it indoors during November - April and outdoors May - October.

    any advice appreciated ⦠also anyone in my area with plants or seeds? I am in Ojai, CA (1.5 hours north of Los Angeles)

    Thank you & kind regards

  • farm96744
    6 years ago

    I just caught two asian psyllids on my tree, which seem to prefer the curry leaf tree over the citrus that I have! I do know it's related to the citrus family. We're so far negative for HLB in Hawaii but seeing the psyllids is enough to drill things in on how serious the situation really is.

    If you're in Southern CA where there is the threat of both psyllids and HLB. It would probably be best to get seeds and keep indoors by a sunny window. Or source from a non-quarantine state and be very very vigilant and/or spray.

  • fruits_veggies
    6 years ago

    hi farm, i would like to have your inputs regarding Asian Psyllids.

    I live in Dallas, TX. i have couple of curry leaf plants and a kumquat tree that I got from local Costco, I think my Kumquat is infested with asian psyllids and they also spread to my Papaya tree, which was near the Kumquat tree.

    My plants were in the garage for the winter and I didn't notice these bugs/asian psyllids. Almost 40% of Kumquat is dried.

    Attached are the close up pictures

    {{gwi:385459}}

    {{gwi:385460}}

    {{gwi:385461}}

  • farm96744
    6 years ago

    Hey Fruits,

    The good news is that if they did spread to your papaya tree, then they most likely are scale and not citrus psyllids which are specific to citrus and closely related species like the murraya curry leaf tree.

    The bad news is that unlike psyllids which quickly emerge out of the covered scale like stage and you can then spray; scale can be very resistant to spray because they stay under that thick covering.

    And since the trees are for edible purposes, the other method of dousing the soil which a systemic chemical wouldn't be good.

    You'll need to manually pick off each and every scale. then spray with neem or bayer to get all the mobile nymphs. this will get the scale infestation under control. there will be one or two survivors, but you can eventually pick them off.

    Looks like there is also some spider mite infestation, which probably accounts for the rapid drying, so spraying will also help take care of that.

    Remember to trim off all the dead dried out twigs.

    To summarize, pick off the scale, spray, then bring them outside! Make sure you let the top layer of soil get bone dry before watering. And then drench the pot completely. Don't fertilize until you get rid of the bugs.

    It's not going to be pretty (back when I was on the mainland, my scale infested citrus was shipped from Texas so I've literally been in the same boat). Hang it there, and they'll pull through!

    This post was edited by farm96744 on Tue, Mar 18, 14 at 2:05

  • fruits_veggies
    6 years ago

    Thanks farm for the detailed response.

    I'm relieved that these are not asian psyllids. I did check all my curry leaf plants and none so far have been infected with these bugs or spider mites. It took 3 years for me to get my curry leaf plants in shape :-), but I'm worried about my jasmine plants, which were close to the Kumquat, hope none got infected.

    I bought neem oil spray from local nursery yesterday and applied to my Kumquat and Papaya trees, before that I wiped the trees with clorox disinfect wipes. I know it is going to be hard work but determined to get rid of them from my plants.

    Thanks again farm. Could you please post some pictures of your curry leaf plants, i would like to get an idea for pruning/shaping my curry leaf plants.

  • Himal
    6 years ago

    Hi i am living in Johannesburg South Africa.

    I have had this curry leaf plant for more than 10 years. recently there seems to be an infestation of some kind on the leaves of the tree.

    Can somebody please help me?

    Thanking You in Advance

  • mick_ps
    5 years ago

    Anyone can help me ? I am actually living in Valencia Spain and last September i bought a curry leaf plant from Reunion island on a visit and it is about 10 inches tall.Since January it has lost its leaves and now its small branches too first the leaves becoming yellowish then a bit dark or brownish.Now i only have the stem ( small trunk) in photo nº 1

    I also brought couple of small pants uprooted from a garden and i planted then in a pot and one started to shoot as can be seen in PHOTO Nº 2.About 3 inches high and then it lost its leaves and now even the stem is drying from the top.

    is it possible for you to answer both questions or shall i write the second one in a different post?

    What can it be?i tried to see if there were bugs etc but could not find any.What could it be? what treatment can i use to help it or any treatment which could be generic for any kind of bugs.Thank you very much for your time and help .

    Mick

  • devpgoyal
    5 years ago

    Hi can you tel me how to take care curry patty in Atlanta. It will be better off out side of inside the house?

  • cara353
    5 years ago

    Hi Dev: As long as the temp at night is over 50 - you are good to keep it outside, preferably in a pot. That way you can take it in during the winter. It likes hot temperatures and plenty of sunshine. I kept my curry plant indoors in front of our glass sliding doors in Florida and it LOVED it there because it got so much sun..it did not do as well outdoors for some reason. ..even during the summer. If you do put it in a pot, try to use a citrus / cactus potting mix. The curry leaf likes that kind of soil because it has sand in it. Good luck!


  • hmqj
    5 years ago

    CrystalGeorgia. You have a beautiful curry plant. Would you be willing to share a cutting or some seeds/flower from your plant. I live in Scottsdale, I would love to have a curry leaf plant. Thank you

  • Richard Christian
    5 years ago

    I had the same scale bug problem above ... my mother suggested using alcohol. I wipe down the entire plant with alcohol including all the leaves scraped off those bugs with my fingernails and clean the entire plant including trimming off any parts that were just not looking like they would survive. I did not replace the soil I simply spray the soil with ant killer and soap which kills white flies and other insects. The plants survived that infestation and is doing great now the problem is with these plants we want to take them out in the summer and every summer these damn bugs come back can somebody tell me how to protect them from this when you're outside because I think basically the ass bring their little colony over and grow them on the plant and if they're going to be on your deck it's difficult to avoid that type of thing. I spray for ants often but they keep coming back. Back in the good ol days we could use diazinon and do a kill of every crawling insect but that's not allowed anymore because some stupid people over used it and it ran into the estuary. But now we're stuck trying to fight these things using so many difficult tools insects are so strong and resilient its seems like its impossible to ever win this battle.

  • hmqj
    5 years ago

    I live in AZ and just bought a curry leaf plant on line. I have it in the pot and I watch it daily to make sure its doing OK. Is there anything I need to do to help it flourish. How much should I water it and what is the best fertilizer to use.

  • hmqj
    5 years ago

    Crystalgeorgia where in AZ do you live? to have such a lovely curry leaf plant. I live in AZ too. I wish I could get a cutting from your plant.

  • loveveggies100
    5 years ago

    I got my new curry leaf plant from Logges.com. They sent me another one after I told them that the one sent earlier was turning black in just 3-4 days. It is a small sapling and I am worried about the harsh winter in Cincinnati.

  • harsha zone5b
    5 years ago

    So seeing someone posted there is variety in curry leaf plant from India and one that is found here. Can someone point to resources that has Indian curry leaf plant, i need to use it for cooking. Or if anyone knows what the variety is called.

  • hmqj
    5 years ago

    I live in Scottsdale, Arizona. Does anyone have curry leaf seeds to spare? I will be willing to pay. Thank you.

  • loveveggies100
    5 years ago

    Anyone living in southern California near LA can contact Mr. Rustomji for getting a new curry plant and holy basil. His mail id

    Sammyrustomji@yahoo.com. He might also sends seeds, but please enquire.


    My curry leaf plant is growing and can't complain. I water once in 3-4 days. I also put diluted buttermilk water once in 15 days.


    I have noticed those black spots on the leaf tip and I think it is because if excessive heat from sun. Keeping them indoors in a way helped.

  • tbhargava18
    3 years ago

    Hi,


    I am about to receive a curry leaf plant that I ordered from walmart. I live in Madison, Wisconsin in the USA. I am concerned about growing it here, since it gets extremely cold and lot of snow in the winters. Will it be a good idea to grow this plant here and indoor?. I am really fond of the curry leaf flavor in my food and wanted to always have it. Please suggest how I can take care of the plant.

    Also, does anyone in area near Madison, WI have an Indian variety of he curry leaf plant and can give me seeds as I am no sure what variety I will receive from walmart.

  • hldzion
    3 years ago

    tbhargava18 - just make sure you receive Murraya koenigii Curry Leaf plant. There is another plant sold as "curry plant" and it is quite different. As for taking care of the plant - read all you can online and talk to friends who have it. In your area it is definitely an indoor plant from mid Sept to mid May at least.

  • HU-452030451
    5 months ago

    I have put fresh cow dung in my curry plant after aonth it shedded all the leaves andd looks like dying temprature is moderate what should I

  • cara353
    5 months ago

    If you fertilize with manure, you should make sure to use aged manure, not fresh..it's too strong. Also, curry leaf sometimes does shed it's leaves when stressed. Try re-potting with CITRUS potting soil, give it sunlight, some water and wait a few weeks to see if it will sprout new leaves.

  • hmqj
    5 months ago

    I have green seeds on my curry leaf plant. Can I plant these green seeds?

  • Pyewacket
    5 months ago

    The fruit needs to mature before you can harvest the seed. The seed inside will be quite large compared to the size of the fruit. I don't actually know what the mature fruit looks like because I got mine in the mail and the fruit/rind had already been cleaned from around the seed. I believe that is required by law to stop the spread of citrus greening disease.


    Curry leaf tree seed must be fresh to be viable, if it dries out it won't grow. Apparently I posted here years and years ago when I was living in another state, that plant died pretty quickly. I got seed from a grower in Hawaii about 5 or 6 years ago and most of those plants are still alive and most of the seed DID germinate, all of it, eventually, as far as I remember now. Mine are currently not doing as well as I could wish because where I live now they only get a month or two of outside time.


    I DO NOT put them out until it is at least 50F at night here, this year that didn't happen until mid-July. I expect to have to bring them back in soon because night time temps are already back into the 50F range, it won't be long before they start falling below 50F. It is OK to schlep them in and out during the daytime, and I used to do that, but I've become old and decrepit and its too much for me to do that every day any more.


    Right now mine are past due for a repot, the organic portion of my Growstone-peat-bark planting mix is pretty well spent. Mine flower every year for the past 3 or 4 years but they never set fruit, I'm not sure why - lack of pollinators possibly because I live in the High Sierra Desert area at 5400' altitude.


    I wish my Walmart carried curry leaf plant LOL!

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