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riparian_gw

will willow sucker cuttings root ok

19 years ago

I have a wantabe-mg question for a MG. I have not gotton a response from other forums. I read a few technical notes that said "cuttings from willow suckers lack energy" to root. Is this true and why. I have a nice host tree with many suckers that I planed to use along a creek bed. Thanks, Riparian Restoration

Comments (18)

  • 19 years ago

    A storm blew my neighbors willow over so he cut it up and laid the logs on the groung in a pile. Every single limb that was in contact with the soil sprouted and rooted.

  • 19 years ago

    There's a perfect example. Willow roots easily - still don't know about the suckers. Will make a point of finding out.

    Summer

  • 19 years ago

    Thank you Summer. This spring our Fish and Wildlife Div has agreed to conduct a study of the riparian zone where I live. The state biologist wants to use indigenous cuttings as part of its restoration plan but we only have a limited number of host willows not ravaged by grazing. I purposed to use sucker cuttings from the limited host trees but then recently learned that suckers are to be avoided. Having studied a number of riparian restoration technical manuals all that referenced willow suckers said to avoid them because " they lack the "energy" to consistently root after planting". The success of this restoration in large part will be determined by the availability of on site material which will be a focal point in this study/assessment for funding the restoration.

  • 19 years ago

    Something just doesn't sound right here. I would be contacting the author of that technical manual for a clarification. That assessment just seems to be in error.

    IronBelly

  • 19 years ago

    Riparian,

    Interesting. Please post a follow up on the progress of the restoration project & your observations.

    Summer

  • 19 years ago

    The only thing I can see in that quote that draws attention is the word consistantly. What percentage does the author consider consistant? I can think of a number of reasons there might be problems with some of the suckers and wonder what was the criteria. If I was planting a lot of anything, especially something that had the reputation of rooting easily, I would want them to have non-identical DNA to protect them from various genetic problems. Sandy

  • 19 years ago

    An anecdote: My daughter's church floral arrangement at her wedding had curly willow in it. When I finally started to discard the faded flowers, I discovered that the branches had started rooting. End of story: I planted two and gave others away. One of them became so large within a few years that it had to be cut down because the view was obstructed out of my second floor window! It was in a moist location and it was too near my septic lines.

  • 19 years ago

    seems as thoough we talked about willow cuttings in my MG class. as i remember it willow has a high concentration of auxins( growth hormones) and that they root very easily. also the water that you root them in can be used again as it will have some of the auxins in it...can anyone confirm this.....i would think the suckers would have the same auxins as the host.........give it a try ...they're free

  • 19 years ago

    The auxins that develop root systems are not quite the same as the ones that start them. Growth hormones work in combination with factors such as sugars, sunlight or gravity and a bunch of other things. Yes, the auxins are very active in all willow species. The bark of the black willow was used very early in Indian horticulture to improve propagation odds. Asprin, which was developed from willow infusions was often used by our grandparents to improve propagation. The active chemicals that affect growth are now isolated when willow is used for propagation , so don't use it for your headache. Jessamine

  • 19 years ago

    Suckers are shoots that come up from roots so if you cut some root with the sucker it would already be rooted. But yes generally a sucker will not root if cut with no root attached because it is "too weak", it simply has not yet decided whether it is a root or shoot.

  • 19 years ago

    The shoots are located at the base of the host tree, are they stems or am I being deceived?

  • 19 years ago

    What area do you live? Is there a way to get some cuttings from other areas but of the same type of tree? There is a large restoration area in Othello that has all different types of willows.

  • 19 years ago

    Flowerfan, I am located in Lincoln Co. The restoration area is private land located on Cottonwood Creek which feeds Hawk Creek to the Columbia. The restoration you are refering is I think part of the Crab Creek preserve controbution to Moses Lake? I did use the "sucker growth"??? because of time restraints, but may need more willow material for next season. I plan to continue planting willows up Cottonwood creek on some state land. It's so much fun and interesting too!!!

  • 17 years ago

    COMMENT ON POST: Kimmsr Jan. 30, 05; 7:37

    I chopped an underground sucker root that sprouted a single shoot [3ft.] above ground and transplanted it. It had no hair roots...only was attached to mother tree. It is hearty.

  • 13 years ago

    I just cut some suckers from my willow out back. I'm going to give it a try and see if they root. I'll let ya know how they do!

  • 4 years ago

    @momoftwins1_comcast_net what was the result?

  • 3 months ago

    I live I eastern KY I see these roots or stems on Mt willow tree can I cut or dig these up and replant them I want lots more willow trees on my property would love to have info on this if