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Kohler Choreograph?

cplover
October 5, 2015

So we are planning on adding a tiny master bathroom to our home. Hubby is dead set against tile and in looking for alternatives, I have found Kohler Choreograph. Has anyone seen or used this product? Looks promising, but am hesitant to try it since it is so new and fairly pricey. I would prefer to use tile, but hubby is sick of grout, so this maybe a compromise to acrylic/fiberglass unit.

Comments (205)
  • Rob McDonald

    I would imagine you could use tile floor. I went with with the solid shower base as it has the lip that the shower walls fall inside of so there is not chance of leaking on the corner where the wall meets the floor.

  • PRO
    Lehman Associates, P.C.

    Hello Rob, I purchased the mirror through Wayfair.com, a great source (as well as Houzz) to find good products at reasonable prices.

  • Ashleigh Verdier

    Osirises - I have a message out to Kohler right now waiting to hear if you can use these with a tile floor. I don't really want a tile floor, but my shower space is 30" x 66" and no one makes a pan for less than $1000 in that size. Kohler did say that you can use the panels with any shower pan or bath tub. Home Depot has a nice looking pan with a seat and shelf built in, for $300 and one of the reviewers shared pics with the Choreograph vein cut dune walls. It looks very nice. I'm ordering the vein cut dune, and flat dune walls for two bathrooms that I'm renovating in my new house.

  • osirises

    Thanks for the info! So far both contractors I have met with have never heard of Choreograph!?, although the Kohler rep at the showroom told me it’s so popular, that’s why it has a 6 week lead time. I’m waffling- maybe this is the type of product that competent DIYers use? If one does tile on the floor maybe be consistent and use it all over? Argh I can’t decide!!

  • PRO
    Lehman Associates, P.C.

    Ashleigh, I am not sure if Kohler makes a 30" x 66" shower pan but you can check with their "Groove" pans. They work perfect. On the other hand, yes, you can use Choreograph walls with a tile pan with no problem.


  • nancyinmich

    Ashleigh, have you considered using a 60 inch shower pan, but then putting a 6 inch deep "toe shelf" or ledge in at a comfortable height? The walls will be 66" apart above the toe shelf, but the pan will be 60" wide. You build a 2 x 4 and cement board structure a foot or 18" above the floor height on the one side, then waterproof it, cover with your Choreograph scraps or tile. You could make it slant quite a lot if it was just to rest a foot for shaving and washing, so it would not have to be a place for water to pool. Since most of the wall is still at 66 inches, no need to move the wall, you just have to do a bit of construction on the bottom bit.

    It would be like a bench, but for feet. I think of benches and shower pans like this: To my feet, the shower is as wide as the shower pan is, but to my shoulders, the shower is as wide as the walls above the bench are. See. For this, your toes see the shower pan and think the shower is 60 inches wide. Your ankles agree. But your knees say, "no, this shower is 66 inches wide!" You don't have a shower pan sitting under a bench, and you won't have one sitting under the toe shelf. But the 66" wide walls that you want to hold your Kohler Choreograph will be holding all but the very bottom of your wall.

  • K B
    Can Choreograph be cut? 96" panel on one side needs to be trimmed to fit 60" wall.
  • Ashleigh Verdier

    Nancy - I love that idea. I'm going to give this some serious thought and figure out what it would take. I wanted a bench for shaving anyway, and I had just given up the idea because it was too much trouble. But in this case it might be the easiest and best way to handle this. Thank you for the idea Nancy!


    KB - Yes, you can cut them down. There are specific instructions from Kohler on how to make the cuts, you'll need saw horses and a circular saw, and they recommend cutting from a specific side. Their website has the instructions on the product page. You can buy panels that are 60" wide, and if it is the height that is an issue I would recommend buying the 72" tall panel instead. It is about $200 less for that kit than the 96" kit and you have only a foot to trim instead of two and a half feet.

  • PRO
    Smith Construction

    Curious how much does a contractor charge to install? How much time does it take from demo to completion?

  • osirises

    I’ll keep you posted once I get the detailed estimates. 3/3 contractors haven’t heard of it so far...

  • knaijaqueen

    Just commenting to continue to follow this thread. I'm thoroughly convinced to go the solid surface route for my shower reno!

  • Ashleigh Verdier

    Just an FYI, it is taking a very long time to arrive. I placed my order for the Dune walls on May 14th and yesterday the bath store told me the current ship date isn't until June 23. Plus there is about 5 days of shipping before they arrive here. I'm thinking at this point I'll be trying to install them beginning of July with that schedule. If you want to use them, anticipate 8 weeks from order to install I guess rather than the 4-6 weeks Kohler says.

  • HU-42876753718156

    Removing our tub and installing a shower only. Have looked at Kohler’s Choreograph, but then visited a showroom with a product called Tere-Stone. It’s over 70 percent stone. I really liked it. Has anyone heard or used this product?

  • nancyinmich

    I have not. If you don't get more answers here, start your own thread on the Bathroom Forum to ask about it. Maybe someone not getting notices from this thread will have experience with it.

  • nancyinmich

    Houzz user, I looked up Tere-Stone and read this from its site:

    "Consisting of natural stone, Dolomite (approximately 74% material
    composition), Terephthalic resin (approximately 24% material
    composition) and proprietary components (approximately 2% material
    composition), TERE-STONE® is
    cast with an "NPG" Isophthalic get coat system. While having a gel
    coat normally invokes a negative reaction, Taylor's gel coat system is
    an integral component to the base material and is resistant to stains,
    burns and abrasions. Scratches can be easily removed simply by buffing
    and polishing the surface. With a material composition and consistent
    color throughout the base material, similar to solid surface products,
    damages to the surface can be repaired utilizing a consumer-friendly
    patch kit."

    I think if you read further up this thread you may find a discussion of why some of us prefer a true Solid Surface product to a gel-coated one. if not, go to the top of the page at the Bathrooms Forum and do a search on Solid Surface. You will find threads about it. You need to understand how repairable a solid surface product really is. The Tere-Stone is NOT a Solid Surface product. But then, neither is the Onyx Product shower systems or the good old Marbleite (which looks a lot better these days, but is still gel coated).

  • Chisos

    following

  • nancyinmich

    Okay here is my non-Choreograph, solid surface Transolid shower. It is curbless, 37" deep and 61.5" wide finished dimensions. I got the trench drain shower pan, the ADA shower walls and wall extension to take the walls to the ceiling, then bought another sheet and some molding to do the ceiling, as well. My contractor did the installation for everything that meant cutting a hole in the wall material, from the lights to the foot rest shelf in the lower right corner. The wall kit included the half-round molding for the top of the wall and the corner moldings and front edge moldings. We got the top edge moldings and the top corner moldings because we were doing a full-coverage application.

    The ADA shower pan, shower walls, wall extension, adhesive, two sheets of 36" x 96" 1/4" material for the ceiling (I only needed one, but they later sent me a half dozen trim pieces that they did not think to send with the original order via overnight or next day delivery with no extra charge, so I got it back in the end.) cost with free shipping and 5% discount (a coupon which seems to always be in effect) was $3262. Sales for Transolid are through Bath1.com.

    Delivery was within a week of ordering.

  • Agnes
    Thank you everyone for all of your great info. Question for you, if doing a slab like Cambria in the shower, will it be relatively easy for an installer to drill all the holes for the plumbing fixtures and grab bars?
  • beaniebakes

    Nancy-congratulations on the new shower. It looks wonderful. The grab bars are attractive and not institutional-looking at all. All showers should have them, in my opinion (should be code.) Does the slide bar have a shower head on it? I can’t quite make it out. What faucet handles were used? And I love the linear drain. I hope you have many years of enjoyable and safe showers!

  • nancyinmich

    Hi Beaniebakes,

    Yes, the vertical bar does have a hand-held shower head slider, but the handheld was sitting on the holder that is attached to the water hose stub when the picture was taken. I just ordered a holder for that, too, since I was not sure where it would be situated in the shower when I was ordering things. It turned out they ended up right next to each other.

    The shower plumbing is Strom, The Sign of the Crab. Rio Grande style. There is a temperature control valve in the center, with the rain shower and regular shower head controls above it. Since the Temp Control Valve had a tub control going downward that we were not going to use, I suggested that we put the hand held control there, as a sitting user could reach it easier there. So the hand held control is the one below everything else. Each porcelain button has the name of what it controls written on it. That is what I loved about Strom! I could buy the buttons with names or with pictograms indicating the use of each handle. I don't like pictograms, they make me think too much.

  • nancyinmich

    Agnes, Cambria quartz is just like stone, so drilling anything is for a stonecutter to do. Once you understand that, then yes, one hole is like another - for the stonecutter. No DIY with Cambria! Look at my shower. Consider if you would ever be putting in safety rails, or if you were going to have multiple shower heads. Are you going to have the ceiling done in Cambria, too? If not, then a rain head like mine would be a relatively easier addition to a regular shower head. But a hand-held and the bar to hold it is at least three holes. How much does the stone guy charge per hole? Find out before you commit.

    Solid surface is a lot easier to work with than stone. It is something to think about. Price out Cambria, too. They have been pricing it pretty high in many places lately. I was going to go with a Cambria Parys counter, 16" x 64" and they wanted $2800. I went with black walnut for $500. Their greed lost them a customer.

  • cconnie

    Hi everyone. Great thread! I've tried to skim everything but there's a ton of info. We are looking for a solid surface that can be installed directly over existing tile. Does Choreograph work that way? Corian? I did see that transolid can. Thanks!


  • Agnes
    Thank you Nancy for the excellent words of wisdom. You're shower looks beautiful and we are going for something like that as well. How do you like your linear drain at the entrance of your shower? We were thinking like you solid surface all around including ceiling. I was thinking of maybe doing one feature wall in Cambria and the rest in a more budget friendly white solid surface. I'm new to this solid surface world so is that feasible? Locally we are a very small community so not sure there are the craftsmen here to work with ss. What should we know/look for? Thank you again as I appreciate everyone's input and advice.
  • nancyinmich

    Agnes, you want a carpenter or contractor or handyman who knows how to scribe to make the surfaces fit together. No wall is square. The sheets of material ARE square, so to fit in your space, they need to be trimmed to fit.

    Some shower kits, like mine, divide the back wall horizontally or vertically. Others, like Swanstone, give you a one-piece back. You have to decide for yourself which look you prefer (or like me, if you will settle for the other look!). Trim pieces may be involved with the division of the back wall, or may not. Mine did not use trim at that point. My trim pieces that you see going around the shower are at the point where the regular wall height ended and the extension kit started. There is also the nice squared off trim around the outer edge. Then there is a cove trim on all of the inside corners. Other shower wall sets may have cove trim on the inside corners, or may simply butt them. I am not aware if any will sell you the extra cove set so you can trim out the corners between the ceiling and the walls, like Transolid did. (They just kept sending me trim pieces until we got the right ones. I think they realized they goofed by not having figured out which ones to send me in the first place.)

    I love my linear drain, but I back it up by having a drain in my floor. If my linear drain should fail, or any of the bathroom plumbing leaks
    or overflows, I have a drain in the floor in front of the leg of the
    vanity that will catch it. That means that the floor of the room is slightly sloped because it is essentially an entire second shower system! My contractor bought a Kerdi shower floor system that sloped the floor to the drain (it was super-hard foam), and covered it with Kerdi membrane that went up the wall 5". The room's entry area was outside this "shower" area, and has a Kerdi foam ramp underneath that gives it a slight slope up from the room threshold to the "shower" area. This also keeps the water in the room's "shower" area if a major flood occurs, and away from the room's door. So far, there is no need for the second drain, but I could imagine a washcloth covering the main drain, or over-spray if a shower user did not have the curtain closed right, causing water to go out onto the floor. I also have three shower heads in the shower. I use no more than 1 1/2 at a time, which the drain can handle. If someone turned on all three, water could escape the shower. They would run out of hot water pretty quickly, so it would have to be a short shower!

    These are the kinds of considerations you have to take into account when you have a level-access shower with a trench drain that slopes to the front of the shower. I would not do it without the room drain, and I believe that it is code to have the room drain. I just like having the room drain in general, too. They are standard practice in other parts of the world and I don't know why we never did them in the US.


    As for your feature wall in Cambria, it could be very attractive if the stone were used in the countertops, too. You would have to choose the stone and the solid surface very carefully to get the right look. I imagine you could butt the SS to the Cambria and caulk the joint, but you would have to talk to both the Cambria and the manufacturer of the SS to be sure. Are you sure that you don't like any of the Choreograph choices? They have a very zen feel in their sedimentary rock look. (Though I understand that you have to order way ahead of time due to slow delivery.)

    One thing I don't like about my Transolid product is that the color/pattern differences in each panel are obvious and bother me. The amount of veining and gray cloudiness over the white vary enough that one section of the shower looked really different to me compared to the rest. Adding the trim pieces to section off the panels really helped me to get past that, though. I was surprised that this worked, and is a good aspect of having the trim.

  • Agnes
    Thank you Nancy for your valuable info and time!!! Much appreciated!
  • jswander01
    I would appreciate any information or advice on how to cut and seal Choreograph around a shower window.
  • H B

    Cutting instructions can be found online, needs a special blade. I cut down samples (12”x12”) to make two tiles, and I used construction glue to adhere them to wall and caulked around the edges. Not sure what the best approach would be in your case.

  • jswander01
    Thanks H B. Reading the instructions will be my next step! (I’ve enjoyed your earlier posts and I’m glad you’re still checking in on this thread).
  • Lucy

    We installed choreograph walls and love them. They are easy clean with just a wipe. We used the recommended glue and braced the walls to create firm adhesion. Left over night or two. We like them so much, we are in the process of putting them in our new lake house.

  • Javon Steffen


    I am almost done with a big house remodel. And we used the choreograph white one the long wall in our master (the glass wall partition isn't installed yet) and in our spare alcove shower. Both look great! It took some finding to get a qualified installer in my area and a couple of the trim pieces came in a little scuffed. I found replacements at home depot that worked just fine. I also got a sample of the choreograph ahead and paint matched it for the paint throughout my whole house. It looks so clean. I also ordered a few extra panels and used them as a backsplash. I haven't seen anyone use it for this method before so it was a little risky but so far it's been really easy to clean up and flows well.

    I used a lot of these threads in my research so I wanted to share a few more pictures of how it can look.



  • Javon Steffen





    I am finishing up a house remodel (my first and probably only but I loved how much I got to learn). And I used these threads in a lot of my research. I used the choreograph white for a long wall in my master shower/tub area (the glass partition wall hasn't been installed over the curb yet), a spare bath alcove shower, and even a backsplash. I actually got a sample ahead of time and color matched for the paint that went through the whole house. It keeps colors very cohesive and lets the architecture of the design be the focus I think. Since it's still such a new product I wanted to share how it can look in some different configurations. So far I've loved it, the ease of cleaning, and the matte finish.

  • Karen Mikolainis

    Has anyone used the textured choreograph, like this?

  • nancyinmich

    Debbie, I would start thread in the forum to ask this, since so few people on this thread have done Swanstone. More will see it there.

  • adrw

    I am wondering if anyone has used these Choreograph panels (trimmed as necessary) to fit above the walls of an existing tub in lieu of tile? We have an old tub, grandfathered in size and could not fit a newer tub in the space and still have a door of a reasonable size, so plan to keep the tub and do something to make the walls more waterproof and cleaned up. I had been looking at the Choreograph white panels (know they won't "match") and found this thread. Thanks for all the super helpful attention to details and general information. Has anyone framed out a tub enclosure with these panels? Any particular advice in this case? Assume the base would have to be calked to the tub, which has a small lip against the walls. Thanks, Anne

  • H B

    We have choreograph above a tub (photos very early in this thread with the purple trimmed grohe fixtures). Choreograph has very good instructions, they probably address the tub to wall intersection. Happy to post more photos if you like. And we have kohler acrylic tub (both white) and no, they don’t match, choreograph is slightly grayer. Installed nearly two years with two teen girls pretty much living in the bathroom LoL.

  • Christina Rowley

    H B and anyone else with both Swanstone and Kohler - if you had to do it over again, which would you select?

    We‘re looking to redo our whole master bathroom, which is long and narrow (5ish ft x 8/10ish ft). I’m looking to do it in a gray color scheme, so gray wood-looking vinyl tile floors with light gray vanity and light counters. Our shower is 36x60 and we’re looking to do a semi-frameless sliding glass door. There are so many options that it’s overwhelming! Thanks in advance!

  • H B

    I’ll share my thinking, as I did each for different reasons....the choreograph we used is “white” which is actually slightly grey (get samples if this is important to you; although Koehler can he horribly slow, like months, in being able to ship these....it’s possible to purchase 12” square samples to get a large enough piece to be useful). We did that bathroom first. (Tub and choreograph kit surround)

    Then with our second bath, I didn’t want white, so got Koehler samples in some of the vein etc. and realized that the pattern was not through the material, which I was concerned that in the event of a scratch, it would look very obvious. Swanstone material is through (I don’t know the correct expression for it) so that was preferable. Think we used their color called tundra. (Koehler cast iron shower pan, swanstone kit walls, no niches used, used choreograph handrails) I think the tundra is quite a nice white and grey fake stone looking swirl pattern. (Ymmv) we used Koehler sliding glass (not frameless) because it was the right price point for our needs and have been very happy wth it.

    both are easy to keep clean. I didn’t consider tile because I hate grotty looking grout (and don’t care to clean it) and after reading too many gardenweb stories, did not trust any tiler doing shower walls. Both Koehler and swanstone have clear directions for handling and installing the material, which is worth reading through and ensuring whoever installs, follows the directions.

    Good luck deciding!

  • nancyinmich

    HB, I thought your Swanstone shower was done in Ice? I almost chose Swanstone (deciding between Tundra and Ice, depending on what the rest of the room ended up with) but their ADA base did not come in a deep enough size. I chose a completely new company to me, Transolid, only because their ADA base was 37.75" deep before the walls went up.

  • H B

    Nancy, you are probably correct, my memory is not great for names of stuff like that!

  • Christina Rowley

    Thanks for sharing! Hoping to check out a showroom offering both options soon! I assume the cleaning process is basically the same for both (just spray cleaner on and rinse?).


    We just moved and I‘m looking to replace tile in the maste bath shower actually. It probably was installed like 10 years ago with large tiles and thick grout lines. It literally grows mold and is incredibly hard to keep clean, I can’t stand it!

  • nancyinmich
    Cleaning depends on both the mineral content of your water and whether you use bar (real) soap versus liquid body cleanser. Body cleanser has no fats, so does not leave a soap scum residue in the trench drain and on the walls and fixtures. I like the trench drain because it allows me to have a level, relatively small shower (3’ x 5’ , though I don’t fully trust the drain not to spill over, so I have a floor drain in the room , too.). It does require more cleaning than the walls and any other kind of drain. I take out the hair every other shower or so. About twice a month, I spray the cleaned-out drain and wipe it clean with TP. I have shoulder length hair and hubby has very short, sparse hair!

    I still have not washed my walls. The shower went into service in July. I squeegee the walls and curtain about once a week, though.
  • PRO
    Hudson Smith Interiors

    The cleaning process with Choreograph is basically nothing. I tested it by going for about 3 weeks without cleaning the shower. Afterward, you could see some mold growth on the caulk, but the walls looked nearly perfect. In our other bathroom, which is tiled, I would've had to really scrub the grout lines after 3 weeks.


    Every couple of weeks I wipe down the walls with vinegar and water (which is my go to cleaning solution). That's it. No scrubbing, no chemicals. Almost two years in, and I still love the choreograph. I wish I had the $$ laying around to rip out the tile in the other bath and replace it this stuff!


    Also, I can't believe how long this thread has gotten!

  • PRO
    Hudson Smith Interiors

    @nancyinmich, I really like how your transolid bath came out. Out of curiosity, how was the cost as compared to choreograph? I'm thinking of spec-ing the transolid for a client, but no one around here seems to know much about it.


    Also, I just re-read your post from months ago about THS. I also found them around 2003, while starting a kitchen reno. What a fabulous community...all these years later it's still great and so helpful. And I agree that Houzz doesn't make the most of the knowledge that's here.

  • nancyinmich

    Husdson Smith Interiors, if you go to the bath1.com site, you can get the prices for almost every size of Transolid shower. Just remember that if you order it, you can get 5% off if you put in the code in the checkout. That said, my ADA shower at 37.75" x 63" (before the walls go up) with the shower tray with the trench drain, the basic wall kit (which goes up to the half-round molding in my pictures), the wall extension kit that takes them to the ceiling, and two panels of plain 36" x96" transolid in my color for the ceiling, cost me $3262. Oh - and if they offer a shower floor but not a wall kit in that size, call them. Mine was not listed for sale, but when I called to ask when/if it would be available, they said that they had it there! They made a custom kit for me and posted it on the site, where I went in and clicked it to order.


    It turned out that I only needed one piece for the ceiling, since the trim covered the edge where I did not have the extra 1.75" ceiling depth needed with the 36" ceiling panel. One ceiling panel came damaged and I am sure they would have replaced it if I needed it, but they later sent me a whole bunch of trim gratis because they forgot to spec out the trim for the ceiling addition, which would have been one 3" x 62" flat piece for the front of the ceiling, plus all of the corner trim pieces for between the walls and the ceiling. They ended up sending me a corner wall trim kit of two 96" long pieces of corner trim - much more than I needed, but that is how it comes! So I would bet that the trim and the damaged panel were a wash in the end. I wanted the ceiling covered, too, since I had the experience of using a wallboard for a shower surround above a tub that looked like tile, but was meant for walls, not showers. It lasted me 20 years and was still in good shape when I sold, and I believe it was because of the excellent installation combined with having the product also on the ceiling, which kept any water from getting behind the panels. I just don't understand why all shower walls do not go to the ceiling - at the very least, if not also covering the ceiling to seal that enclosure UP!


    They really do ship the same day. I had my shower - on two pallets - in a week. The trim they sent often got here overnight. I do live in the next state, though! They are in Ohio. I was very pleased with the responsiveness of Bath1 once we figured out we needed more trim. Once they sent the wrong stuff, and I was told to keep it. No problems whatsoever in dealing with them. I have enough extra stuff in my basement to cover a big counter or table with a 1/4" solid surface and trim to use with it.

  • Christina Rowley

    I see that a few of you have the veincut dune showers - does it look more gray or tan? I’m looking to do grays in our bathroom and the saleswoman said the veincut dune has a gray tint but it’s looking more tan to me in pictures.


    I do LOVE that transolid gray and white marble look!!! So pretty!!


    I’m so grateful that this thread exists and that you guys have stayed active in it years later!

  • beaniebakes

    Christina... have you seen samples? I stopped at a plumbing store showroom and they let me take the sample box home for a few days. Also, samples can be ordered through Kohler’s website. There are two sizes. I ordered a 12” square of the plain white for $10. I ordered it through the plumbing store rather than online and it arrived within a week.

  • PRO
    Lehman Associates, P.C.

    Hi Christina. The veincut dune is not a cold gray. It does have a little bit of warmth to it which makes it more timeless. Carefully select your wall color to match and then, throw in your splash of color in accessories, towels, etc. It can work well with everything from greens, to blues, to reds to oranges. The dune becomes the consistent background and you can change the splash colors as styles (or seasons) change.


    Your lighting color temperatures will also effect the color of the panels. Here is what it looks like in natural daylighting. It becomes very gray but do not use a cold, steel gray paint color. Select one that has a very slight warm hint.


  • Javon Steffen

    Here's an update of my shower with the glass wall installed for the final effect of the choreograph in a tub shower combo configuration. The plain white choreograph panels were used in 3 sections on the back wall from corner to corner so it extends behind the toilet as well and around two small windows. One transition strip is shown and the other is right next to the point where the glass meets the wall. I really like the grab bar. And after using the shower for a few months I can say that the choreograph panels are one of my favorite parts because of how easy they are. They look just like painted drywall and because of that they don't distract the eye and instead encourage focus on the best elements. Instead of having so many competing tiles and elements that the bathroom always looks busy. But I'm a bit of a minimalist.


  • Karen Mikolainis

    How do you like the shower barre? We are planning on getting one. Thanks! Also, what faucets did you go with?

  • H B

    Love the barre, have one in each bath. Make sure to block behind it.

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