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mkrilmas

Terrible Experience with Caesarstone

Mike
December 6, 2017

I have Caesarstone counters in other properties and have been happy with them. Unfortunately, my most recent experience has been a nightmare. I had Caesarstone counters installed in a new kitchen and chose Rugged Concrete (4033), which is a new product from Caesarstone. Although the product looks very cool as it mimics concrete, it does not function practically as a kitchen counter. Every little grease mark, including fingerprints or anywhere you place a dish is extremely visible and very difficult to clean. If you place a wine glass, you need to scrub the counter with Vim to remove the ring. When I complained to Caesarstone, they sent a technician who advised that it was necessary to frequently clean the counters with Vim and a specific acetone (nail polish remover) from Shoppers Drug Mart. I am very unhappy with the counters and will not be keeping them. My fabricator offered to take care of the labour to replace them and when I asked Caesarstone to help by giving me the new material for cost, they said the best they could do was 10% off because the counter was not "deemed defective". They're customer service was also horrible to deal with (Diana and Ruta) and continually blamed me for not expecting the product would be like this. I did not ask Caesarstone to lose one penny to fix the situation, but they insisted on making a profit a second time on the same project.


The rings in the below photo are from a wine glass that had nothing but water on the base. The rings are dry and have already been wiped with warm soapy water.




Comments (201)

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Exactly the question, but lets assume it's this, and an earlier Houzz comment

    "We had Caesarstone honed Raven installed in our kitchen in July & we love it.

    CARE:

    We'd read about the "extra care" that it requires and that scared us some, but we took the leap because we love the color and the matte finish. We find that everything wipes off very easily. It does show circle marks from wet glasses and if you leave oil on it for a while you may see the mark, but I have found that using a blue SOS pad gets even oil marks right off.

    The manufacturer recommends cleaning with a blue Brillo/SOS pad, Comet Scratch Free with Bleach, and Soft Scrub Gel with Bleach. I have used all 3 and like the Brillo/SOS pad the best. We did have one weird mark on it shortly after we got it (I am not sure from what) that I had to scrub a bit to get off, but it did come entirely off.

    It is definitely easier to maintain if you wipe it down after you are finished cooking. We don't use any spray cleaners on it, just wipe it down with a damp cloth or with soap and water after using. We use the SOS pads probably once a week or when I am doing a thorough clean of the kitchen. We are pretty laid back in our household (we certainly don't keep an immaculate kitchen) and even with that we have had no trouble keeping the counters looking good."

    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/raven-caesarstone-counters-dsvw-vd~2680010

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    donnamsb

    Sorry to hear your experience with Raven from Caesarstone. It is a known product and colour for extra care issues and considerations. It does have a tendency to show marks more easily than other colors no matter the brand.


    The major issue with Raven or colors like Midnight Black and especially Vanilla Noir many inexperienced installer after installation is complete. Can sometimes apply a type of sealing agent to the surface to enhance the overall appearance of the product.


    NOTE: these type of sealing agents are NOT for engineered or quartz products. Quartz products simply will not hold the sealing agents. They generally will leave a film on the surface.

    Hence you will get water marks from a glass, the condensation or water is reacting with the surface coating that has been applied. It is quite noticeable if you use a litle CIM on the surface. It will leave a white residue. NOTE: we do not recommend the use of such products as they are abrasive and also caustic. (high pH level).


    Our suggestion would be ring the installer and see if they have used any products like Ager, Hydrex or similar on the wipe down of the countertops once installed. Note, that they may say no even when they have used such a product to cover their own butts.


    Caesarstone is currently made in Israel and USA, though it can be manufactured from other sources as well from time to time.


    We would suggest that you send us some photos to help you further with a solution. As this issue can be fixed.




    There are a few issues with the above comments from JAN MOYER. Being that the manufacturer in this case it is Caesarstone but it also applies to any quartz or man made stone material.


    1) The current care guide does not mention SOS pads or any other such scrubbing pads. They are abrasive and will damage the gloss finish on any quartz products. This includes any products containing bleach.

    Current Caesarstone Care Guide.....


    See the below photo on the new marble ranges which have a higher gloss finish or polish finish to them. Making them more prone to these issues if not correctly cleaned.






    2) Both Soft Scrub with bleach and Comet scratch free with bleach are highly corrosive and caustic with a pH higher than oven cleaner and almost the same as a leaking battery.


    Hence they will eat into the surface over time making any quartz or natural stone surface. Including caesarstone brand and granites dull and harder to keep clean.

    One contains Sulfuric Acid along with some pretty harsh chemicals. If you look at any of the Quartz manufacturers you will see that this will VOID the warranties on any product.


    Links below are for the MSDS of both products. mentioned.

    https://www.uline.com/PDF/SS-7137.pdf

    http://sds.chemtel.net/webclients/cheneybrothers/508065sds.PDF








    Caesarstone Warranty information on these products. Whilst Caesarstone foolishly recommend the use of these products which they do know they will damage the surface over time. We would highly recommend that you always neutralize these products with a pH neutral cleaning agent.


    See caesarstone's own care instructions




    NOTE: using these products that Jan has mentioned above will VOID the warranties.

    Please see section 4 and 11

    Chemical damage is that ... any chemical. It use to be a range of pH 6-8 but has been adjusted for obvious reasons.




  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Note........... I cut and pasted from an older Houzz post.......ONLY to highlight the ISSUES. Not to recommend steel wool or any other abrasive. .....

    Personally, I still love my white Corian : ) Still looks great after nearly 20 years lol . The only thing I'd change to? Marble or soapstone , kid you not.

  • donnamsb

    I'm definitely adamant about following manufacturer's instructions. I've never used anything other than a soapy, wet sponge or a Gleen Cloth (which is just a plain microfiber that you dampen to get a streak-free, lint-free surface). My parents also have Corian counters in their kitchen, which was installed in 1998. It still wears like iron. Regarding marble, it sure is gorgeous, but it is subject to etching even though it's sealed. We have 2 different kinds of marble in 2 different bathrooms. It seems like White Thassos is more impervious to etching from something as seemingly harmless (like the water in those daily disposable contact lens packages), than Carrerra marble. My friend has a soapstone counter from Italy and it has stayed perfect for well over a decade. There's a certain name for that particular soapstone, but I can't remember it at the moment.

  • donnamsb

    To Gayle Minto...Hello! My Caesarstone Raven is polished. And for the record, the fabricator we used (Oceana in Lakewood NJ) did a great job. We've used them before, so I'm not attributing any difficulty with performance of the engineered quartz to them. Nor to me. I care for what we own meticulously, and the primary reason I chose an engineered quartz counter was for ease of care. I'd never use any chemical or abrasive on any counter, man-made or natural. I've followed their instructions and I'm not a sloppy cook or someone who leaves a mess behind to clean up later. Thus, my "surprise disappointment". I certainly didn't count on this.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    donnamsb


    Raven and Vanilla Noir or similar are just one of those colors that will show everything.

    PS soap and water will leave a soap scum build up over time, just like it would to a glass shower screen. Soap resides attract stains and other contaminants. We would recommend as a daily cleaner Stone Power Cleaner which will remove all stains, bacteria etc.


    But a mix of 70% methylated spirits with 30% water will leave the surface clean and germ free. Though may not remove all the stains etc.

  • donnamsb

    Thanks for your helpful advice! I just wish I knew those colors would show water rings....I wouldn't have chosen it if I ever suspected plain that old water (literally) on the bottom of a glass would cause such a problem. If the glass "sweats" because it has ice cubes in it, I have to use a coaster. I will say that some of the rings seem to disappear after many months. I wonder if the surface has enough porosity that it takes the water into the very top of the surface, and yet enough density that it takes several months for the water rings to release due to evaporation. Who knows?

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    donnamsb Like we have said, it may be a case of the installer has used a sealer or sealing product on the surface.


    NOTE: All quartz no matter the color or manufacturer will NOT accept a sealer coating nor has one ever been applied at the factory.


    As noted previously some installers will use a sealer or enhancing product to make it look good at the time of completion. Which is what will be causing the water ring marks from cold water etc. This will have to be removed, there is an easy way to do this. If you email us we will let you know what that is



    Thank you

  • Gayle Minto

    Caesarstone tells me to use Softscrub with bleach on my counters (concrete finish) From Caesarstone: "Honed, Concrete and Rough surfaces may require additional daily and weekly care. Due to the nature of the surface design, it is recommended that common household spills like liquid droplets and rings are dried immediately. As with any matte product, owners of Concrete, Honed and Rough finishes may experience seeing an increase in smudges from everyday living.
    Weekly, the surface should be cleaned with Soft Scrub Liquid Gel with Bleach and thoroughly dried".



  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    Well, so much for "low maintenance." Sounds like the cleaning advice for marble.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    I'm on record. We're going to look back on Quartz as we do........:.::Formica:)

    Give me marble or soapstone .

  • Rita / Bring Back Sophie 4 Real

    Amen ^^^^ And judging from comments I have seen on threads here, that process has already started. Quartz is being oversold as hassle-free and hard wearing- and at such a premium price too- I'd rather have the cheapest Carrara than the most expensive quartz. Those with ersatz marble are likely to be the first in line to change to whatever the new, new thing will be. I am a Corian, soapstone or marble kind of gal too. Some granites and quartzite work for me as well.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    And as quartz ages, it won't age well, like marble or soapstone. As one of my design teachers once said, it doesn't WEAR out, it UGLIES out.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC not entirely correct. Any stone will deteriorate if any corrosive or caustic chemicals are used as general cleaning.

    We have seen blue pearl granite go loss 60% of its gloss or shine from the use of general everyday cleaning products.


    The secret is to use a cleaning product in the range of Ph 6-8 which is easy to find.


    All you need to do is enter the name of your cleaning product into google followed by the term "SDS" or "MSDS". You will see in Section 3 the ingredients list if they are hazardous or dangerous chemicals used.

    Section 9 will have the pH level.

  • Mitch W

    Our Raw Concrete still looks as nice and beautiful as the day it was installed.

  • lin15
    I ignored the negative comments regarding the concrete look and I have babied my Caesarstone Raw concrete since the day it arrived. There are no kids to smudge it up but .. strangely large round marks are appearing in areas I do not cook in. It’s on my island and not even near the area where you would think it should be. I’m flipping out.
    I love the look but beginning to think I’m going to pay dearly for nothing. A call is in to fabricator.
  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    The fabricator won't help. But good luck.

  • PRO
    Quartz - Stone Care, Cleaning & Repair Experts

    lin15 send us a photo to have a look at. You will be better off calling Caesarstone and asking for the technical manager to arrange an inspection.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    You can call Caesarstone, and maybe they will listen, but they won't do a thing about it. I've tried.

  • Holly Stockley

    Diana, you could say the same for most man-made substitutes of natural materials, I think. Hardwood floors vs. laminate or LVP, vinyl siding vs. clapboard, slate floors vs. vinyl slate-look. The genuine article is going to acquire a patina with age. The substitute is just going to look tired and terrible. And more obviously fake, with time.

    Of course, may of us (myself included) sometimes choose the fake for budgetary reasons. (I can afford neither real cedar siding nor the terra cotta roof tiles my house "should" have). But I go into it knowing that "maintenance free" really means "must be entirely replaced when it starts to wear.

    The real difference here is that quartz is often as expensive or even more expensive than than the real deal, whereas most of the other immitation products are significantly less expensive. The industry has successfully convinced people that a wad of resin with a little rock suspended in it is superior to the rock. I think the formica analogy was apt. Sooner or later, people will get tired of paying $$$$ for something that doesn't age well, doesn't develop a patina, and just looks bad with time. Whereas I've seen marble and soapstone counters that are 100 years old or more. No, they're not "glossy." They have a worn, soft look but are still lovely.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC

    Holly:


    Most "natural" stones are heavily resinated at the factories. This is because in their natural state they stain or etch more easily. They would be nearly unusable if they didn't have plastic sucked into them.


    It's just incredibly ironic when the natural stoners bleat about nature and purity when in fact the only thing separating them from engineered stone or Corian, plastic, is a matter of degree.

  • jemimabean

    This thread has been super helpful to me (but man, what a journey it is to read it all the way though). We’re buying a new house and are about to launch into our first ever kitchen renovation project. We had Glacier White Corian in our last house and we have soapstone in our current house. Both have had pros and cons, but in choosing countertops for our new home, I think that we’ll pick between one of them. I love the look/color of the Caesarstone Raw Concrete, but could not handle the stress and upkeep described in this thread. What a bummer for those going through it. :(

  • Stephanie
    I love natural materials like marble and soapstone, but ultimately we chose quartz for our recent kitchen remodel. Natural materials have a beauty that is timeless but you also can’t argue with how popular quartz is and that’s for a reason. There are bad choices in each category that will have potential issues, but generally quartz fills a need in the market. We had quartz counters in a previous home in a bathroom and they were good looking and basically maintenance free. That’s what people want. Just my opinion.
  • HU-774496045

    Ceasarstone Ocean Foam, which is a polished product, looks good and seems easy enough to clean with water and microfiber or something simple. The Caesarstone Sleek, in “concrete” finish, which is very matter like is NOT. Shows everything. Every drop, fingerprints, smudges etc.....in other words, the result of daily life. I’m still po’d at myself for ending up with this stuff. I had Corian in old house for years and it was an excellent product. So easy to maintain. I feel like the “easy care” is a bunch of marketing bs. There was absolutely no finish placed on either product by the fabricators. Zip. No idea what to use if I don’t use what ceasarstone recommends, i.e., soft scrub with bleach on the concrete finish.

    Ceasarstones 3 non-polished finishes are “honed, sleek and concrete they rec the soft scrub on all of those.


  • motownfilley

    I am so appreciative this article was made available! We are in the process of kitchen and bath remodels and will not consider quartz countertops. This has saved us a lot of time. Thank you HOUZZ.

  • jmm1837
    motown - the comments here refer only to this particular type of quartz. The more standard versions do not have these issues. Just as some real stone is high maintenance and other types quite low, so it is with quartz.
  • Gayle Minto

    Not sure why my last comment was credited to Hu07744......, anyway, jmm1837, if you are buying a product billed as "more durable than granite" and "a virtually maintenance free" it is completely unacceptable to end up with something on your countertop which requires baby-ing to this level. When you read things such as "Quartz countertops are just as strong as granite but have the added benefit of being more flexible making them less likely to chip or crack. Quartz is non-porous and does not require any sealing - ever. These stones offer a virtually maintenance free kitchen work surface." and from Consumer Reports: Quartz--This mix of mineral, color, and resin is meant to mimic stone but is more du­rable and requires less maintenance, making it a good choice for a kitchen that gets a lot of use. Hot pots, serrated knives, abrasive pads, and most stains were no match for quartz." I also thought I was educated on certain aspects such as quartz not being able to withstand heat (due to resins) and accepted that. IMHO, quartz is quartz...unlike the multiple options of natural stones/rocks which comprise, among others, soapstone, granite, marble, travertine.

  • jmm1837
    No, quartz does have variations. The original versions, like Ocean Foam, do live up to the marketing hype (more or less) - not bullet proof, but tough, durable and easy to clean. They don't take heat well, but then neither do many types of stone. It's the fancier, newer types of quartz that have these problems.
  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    Not totally true. I have Caesarstone "Raven" and it has water marks that I can't get out. It's also chipped. Marketing BS indeed.

  • donnamsb

    Hi Diana,

    I also have Caesarstone "Raven", and it's so "water-sensitive", it's atrocious. Water rings on a kitchen counter that's supposed to be as tough as granite, but easier to care for. Let that sink in, people (no pun intended). Water rings. Water. rings. Marketing BS, indeed.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    Hey Donna, I've written this before, but I'll say it again--I called Caesarstone and they responded but never did anything other than saying to use Soft Scrub with Bleach, which did not work on the water rings. Very frustrating.

  • donnamsb

    Hi Diana,

    From reading through so many of these posts, it's apparent that pursuing any remedy from Caesarstone is utterly futile. Our kids are grown and out of the house, so we don't have even a "heavy-use" kitchen. Also, there is no "coating" or sealer applied to our Caesarstone. As I said, water seems to be one of the major arch-enemies of "Raven". I've never used Soft Scrub (with or without bleach), nor any abrasive cleaner (nor would I, ever)! It seems counter-intuitive to use such a thing on a polished surface, which is obviously porous enough to be affected negatively by even something as benign as water, anyway. I guess every Caesarstone customer had better just learn to suffer in silence.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    Well suffer yes, but not in silence. I tell everyone about my experience, both here on Houzz and anywhere else. I think that the dark colors are worse, but I have no proof of that. I do know that my daughter has Silestone "Lagoon" which is a white marble-look quartz, and she has had no problems with it. And it is a very heavily used kitchen (3 kids).

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    Your dark carpet shows lint, your black cashmere coat shows salt. ....your linen shirt wrinkles, and your adorable dog has bad breath. You live here, and spring/summer refuses to arrive until WHO THE HELL KNOWS WHEN. Possibly never for 2019........usually lovely if/when it arrives : (

    Raven quarts shows water spots, and Concrete shows lots of things. ...............

    We don't expect ten year 24/7 "perfection" from anything we buy. But we somehow EXPECT it from a counter surface. Is it reasonable? No.

    Corian, nearly "perfect" isn't organic enough, and WHOA not "new" enough

    Soapstone, as anti microbial as one can get, heat resistant as one can get, fixable, sand-able, BUT. You will see imperfect spots, tiny scratches, a little chip or a minor ding.

    Granite: ..........depends which. Honed? Glossy? Bold? Simple? Plain? It's love or hate.

    Quartz......Man made, not organic. Can chip. The best? Best? Fine and spidery veined marbles. jmho

    Marble.......we could write a novel here, depending your tolerance for imperfect

    Quartzite......depends......

    Butcher block, stainless, and on we go

    That's the long way to "perfect" above, until you realize it doesn't even exist. : ) I realize the topic is specifically Caesarstone, .....but you can pick ANY of them apart and the actual consumer experiences that go with them.

  • PRO
    Diana Bier Interiors, LLC

    I agree with everything you've said, Jan. Nothing is perfect. The problem is that the quartz manufacturers mislead consumers into believing that their product is perfect/bulletproof, and it's not.

  • jmm1837
    To be fair, how many stones marketed as wuartzite are actually dolomite? As always, and with everything, the motto should be, "buyer beware." I wouldn't eliminate all quartzes because some are higher maintenance than others, any more than I'd eliminate all stone because some of it is mislabelled. I'd do my homework on the one's I'm interested in.
  • donnamsb

    Hello Diana and Jan...Diana, funny you also commented positively on your daughter's Silestone, because I have had a very positive experience with Silestone, too. We've got it in our powder room off the kitchen, and it was a very heavily used surface when all of our kids were still at home. I think we've had it since 2004, and it still looks as good as the day it was installed. Actually, I had posted on Houzz about it a while ago, in an older Caesarstone thread. A close friend also has Silestone in her kitchen, and she is not at all easy on it. Her Silestone performs beautifully, in spite of her treatment of it. And Jan, (like Diana), I agree with you. This isn't about expecting absolute perfection, constantly. I'm quite familiar with lots of other materials. We also have Calcutta marble in one bathroom, White Thassos and Carrara marble in another, granite in a third bathroom. We have a bluestone floor in the foyer. Because they're natural materials, I didn't expect them to be bullet-proof. (Ironically, all are sealed with DuPont Bulletproof sealer, though)! In other homes, we've had limestone, slate, even butcher-block Formica from the 1970's. By the way, the Formica wore like iron. It was impossible to kill it. But I agree with Diana, that quartz manufacturers (at least Caesarstone) DOES oversell their performance. I did a whole lot of research when I was choosing each appliance and surface material when planning our kitchen, and couldn't find any issues with water. Even our fabricator said they weren't aware of any issues. So, I'M CALLING YOU OUT, CAESARSTONE! SINCE YOU'RE DISINTERESTED IN HONORING YOUR WARRANTEE, AT LEAST HAVE THE DECENCY TO LABEL THE FINICKY COLORS IN YOUR LINE, SO THAT BUYERS CAN DECIDE IF THEY ARE WILLING TO LIVE WITH THE DEFICITS IN THEIR PERFORMANCE.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    What a word, that "warranty" . A paste from the actual residential. The link to full at bottom.. Now......read it, and try to figure out what it DOES cover. The answer? Basically nothing. And certainly not rings, or water spots,: ) Read it. Even a big crack, is a probably not.

    (v) Given that Caesarstone® Slabs are manufactured from natural materials, each slab is unique and variations to shading, quartz distribution and reflectivity do occur and are naturally occurring characteristics of the material. Consequently, (a) samples are indicative only and may vary from the final product; and (b) naturally occurring variations in appearance caused by artificial or natural lighting are not covered by the warranty; Changes in the appearance of the slab from reflected light is a natural part of the slabs.

    And BEST TO LOWER YOUR LIGHTING AND DROP THE SHADES?

    (vi) inspections of the surface of the slabs is to be in a normal viewing position with the slab being illuminated by “non-critical light”. “Non-critical light” means the light that strikes the surface is diffused and is not glancing or parallel to that surface.

    file:///Users/Apple_Owner/Downloads/2015%20Caesarstone%20Warranty%20Guide.pdf

  • donnamsb

    Hi Jan! It's not worth the paper it's written on! BUT...if we can save just one potential buyer of Caesarstone from a huge, costly mistake, it's good!

  • PRO
    Renov8or

    I used Ceasarstone pure white in my kitchen. After living with it several months, I haven't had any problem with rings or etching. Grease marks come off with a degreaser like Dawn. The only problem marks have been rust stains from the little feet on our coffee press. I used magic eraser and it helped. They're very faint now - well DH says only I see them. :-) We now use a trivet under the coffee press. The OP's photo is disturbing. I'd be very annoyed if I had that happen. Our surface isn't as glossy. Is it possible some sealer was applied? Or does it come in various glosses?

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER

    @renovbar


    Metal marks and rust marks will come right off of quartz with ordinary rust remover. Put a tray under your coffee pot. : ) Gently swipe on, softly scrub, and immediately rinse well.

    A simple brush with a belt buckle can leave a seemingly permanent mark on white quartz. This gets it OFF.



  • PRO
    Renov8or

    Thank you, Jan!

  • Mitch W





    Here are two pics of my year and a half old countertop - Caesarstone's raw concrete. The one on top is in between my sink and stove, and is heavily used. It gets splattered by grease from the stove, dirty dishes get placed upon it, water from the sink splashes, the cat walks on it (and leaves cat prints!), the dishwasher is under it, etc. etc. And it has not a single stain. The bottom photo is opposite the stove and that counter is 9' long. What plain water doesn't remove from my countertops, the Stone Guys' Benchtop Power Cleaner removes instantly and without a trace.


    I have no fear of leaving water glasses or wine bottles on the counters. The cat, on the other hand, is really annoying!

  • lin15
    Hi.. is that the correct name for the product from the stone guys? I can’t locate it.
    Thanks!!!!!
  • Mitch W




    That's her! Didn't mention this, but as part of our renovation, I had some shiny white Caesarstone installed for the windowsill, in both the kitchen and bathroom. Rosie is sitting on said window sill and making a mess, I'm sure, since she just finished breakfast.


    And that's the countertop shown between both stove and sink. You wanna see cat prints - every morning the stainless steel has tons!

  • lin15
    Your kitchen looks like mine... I searched the web but no product with that name ...
    maybe it’s listed different?
    Thanks ...
  • Mitch W

    Here's their website...Stone Guys. I was able to buy on Amazon, but the company is in Australia and it currently is out of stock. maybe they'll see this and get some more product to the US.

  • Mitch W

    I contacted the Stone Guys and they wrote back the following: They do have stock but it is on hold at the moment, we are currently sorting that out with amazon distribution.

  • Gayle Minto

    Been out of stock for a very long time. I'd like to try it.

  • lin15
    Here’s a theory my husband has regarding rings .. mine are in an area that I do not use on my very large island. In order to transport stone they use pressure pads to pick up the stone. All of my circles are the same size .. but not the size our fabricator used to move our stone. Which makes him wonder if during processing the stone the pads were used at the factory and then the stone becomes sensitive to moisture in the future when it’s in our homes as they are very strong and could penetrate the product. Just a thought ... my stone is raw concrete.

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