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Stove/Oven Range Downward Draft System

HU-874585772
March 14, 2019

I need some input from someone who understands the ins and outs of using a downward draft system for a range. We really want to put the range on the kitchen island, but the Jenn-Airs that have built-in systems are around $3,000. I see that telescoping downdraft systems are around $500-1000, but I need to know what kinds of ranges will work with these. Can it be any range? Do I have to look for a certain specification on the range? Are these really expensive to install and maybe not saving me any money? I'm going to stop at a few stores to discuss these options but I want to be somewhat knowledgeable before I go. Here's a link to the one I'm looking at: https://www.bestbuy.com/site/broan-eclipse-36-telescopic-downdraft-system-stainless-steel/7055768.p?skuId=7055768

And as a note, this is for a new construction home, and I'd prefer to avoid putting an overhead hood in the middle of the kitchen.

Comments (51)

  • PRO
    Virgil Carter Fine Art

    In my experience with these and Jenn Aire ranges, the exhaust hoods are not high enough to pick up more than a fraction of the steam, grease, fumes, etc., from range-top cooking. Overhead exhausts are much more effective.

    HU-874585772 thanked Virgil Carter Fine Art
  • Matt

    I'm currently in the same boat you are. As the other poster said, take advantage of the online installation instructions. It's all going to come down to your cabinet size, which range you pick and the distance your ductwork needs to travel to the exterior.


    For a 36" unit, i would not got anything below 600CFM. Also, the higher it telescopes, the better so that it has a better chance of extracting fumes/steam from tall pots and pots near the front of the range. Keep in mind if your cooking something that really needs to be exhausted (heavy steam or oil) those pots/pans should use the back burners closest to the vent.

    HU-874585772 thanked Matt
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  • M Miller

    I’d save yourself expense and trouble and difficulty and install the range along the wall with a ducted hood. So much easier! And if you have a romantic notion of cooking facing your guests, or seen it in unrealistic TV shows, actually most of the time spent in the kitchen is doing prep, not at the cooktop. Much better to prep on a beautiful uninterrupted expanse of island with your friends and family, not splattering them with cooking, and getting smoke in their faces.

    Most people who get downdrafts are forced into it by existing construction. You don't have that constraint, and have the luxury of being able to plan for proper overhead exhaust - along a wall.

    HU-874585772 thanked M Miller
  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    Ranges occupy the space that a traditional downdraft cooktop combo uses for the mechanicals. The Best Cattura will fit in a cabinet behind your range, but you will reduce an already anemic performance even further. Downdrafts are better than not having ventilation. But that’s faint praise. Cooking vapors and heat naturally rise. Take advantage of that with a truly effective overhead vent.

    Or redo the design to get the cooking zone off of the island. The typical remodel does not have enough room for the 8’-10’ island that really needs to happen to get a prep sink and cooking zone on it. Most island cooking zones are too small, resulting in cramped prep space, inadequate ventilation, and awkward ergonomics because of turning back and forth to that needed water source. Or, prep just occurs on the perimeter, with your back to the island.

    HU-874585772 thanked The Cook's Kitchen
  • PRO
    Sina Sadeddin Architectural Design

    Downdrafts are just above pointless. They just don't work on anything above boiling water. I suggest you move the cooktop off of the island or put in a real vent hood.

  • HU-874585772

    Thank you everyone for feedback thus far! I'm insisting on doing this because I am trying to recreate my last kitchen. The workflow of this arrangement was perfect for me. I had a Jenn Air with downward draft and it worked extremely well. I didn't find it to be inferior to a traditional hood vent, and actually preferred it because all of the air was sucked down and out of my way. I will have an 8' x 4' island to put this on, but have room to make it a few inches deeper if needed. I'll be making this island a bi-level to give a barrier between the cooking surface and the other side of the island. Very good point about having an uninterrupted island for prep. I will have about 3 feet on either side of this cooktop for prep, so should have enough space there.


    Besides having a nice workflow, it was also nice to sit at the island and eat dinner with the food still warm on the stove nearby, or to be able to do food prep AND cook or bake without turning my back to the kids. I can keep an eye on those boys while doing most of what I need in the kitchen, and that is important to me. No one's mentioned this but I don't want to put the sink in the island because I know it will get cluttered with either dirty dishes or dishes that are drying on the counter. Thanks for the feedback, everyone's opinion is quite helpful!


    The difference with this one is that I'm making it bi-level, and my last island was 12'x4' and completely flat. So I'm hoping I'll still like the workspace.

  • HU-874585772

    Matt, what did you end up going with for your draft system and range? Or haven't you decided yet?

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    The logistics of any of that are very tricky. There is the housing of the downdraft that has to be factored in, and will not fit underva range. Plus the rise of the downdraft. It’s very easy to have the downdraft hit the raised bar, and not provide enough protection so that the bar chars both.

  • PRO
    RES 3d Sketches

    Are you sure you would save money on a separate popup system vs a Jenn-Air integral system? Won't a good independent downdraft system cost as much or more? I believe the Bosch unit would.

    The pop up one are awkward but they prevent people sitting at an island from being exposed to cooking splatter. Its not a good location for a range IMO.

    Here is good guide:

    https://blog.yaleappliance.com/free-ventilation-buying-guide?hsCtaTracking=27392708-6e45-4edd-a80a-55222b91e993%7C20f3919e-6f15-4e17-b30b-b93f294bd88e

    .

  • HU-874585772

    RES 3d Sketches, I have no idea if it would save money or not. I feel like there's some design requirements or installation costs that may or may not make this really expensive. I'm hoping someone on here can enlighten me on that! Thank you for that resource, I'll check it out!


    The Cooks Kitchen, it sounds like this would fit better on a completely flat island rather than bilevel? Maybe that's why my last kitchen was designed with the island flat..though it didn't have a telescoping vent. I think the cabinet designer told me he would start the bilevel rise at 25 inches, but I have some room to extend that.


    I wish I knew how they did it in my last house! We bought it as is and got spoiled with such a huge kitchen. That kitchen was so amazing that we decided we had to build a custom home when we moved because I couldn't find a house on the market with a satisfying kitchen. Didn't realize we had a $3,000 range in there when we sold the place!

  • Matt

    We have a 30" GE induction cooktop and we ordered a 30" whirlpool telescoping downdraft which included the 600CFM blower. I haven't installed anything yet, but based on all my calculations and what not, there's no reason this all won't fit into the 36" cabinet that will be below the cooktop. The ductwork will go straight down from the blower housing into my basement and make a single right turn to the exterior wall for about a 7' run.

    The blower on this unit 10" deep plus the thickness of the telescoping assembly is around 2", so i'm only loosing about 12-13" inside my cabinet.

    Ours will be on a ~40in x 9ft flat island.

    HU-874585772 thanked Matt
  • cpartist

    Have you considered two sinks? A cleanup sink on the perimeter and a prep sink on the island? This way you wouldn't have dirty dishes OR grease and splatter from a cooktop on the island? And since 70% of our time is spent prepping, you'd still be facing the boys as you did the majority of the work.


    You say you'll have 3' on each side. I don't consider that a large amount of prep space. In fact, I consider that the bare minimum. And how will you prep if you don't have a water source nearby?


    Also are you sure your last kitchen was so great or is it that you adapted? We humans are incredibly able to adapt.

  • HU-874585772

    cpartist, If I was working at the stove, the sink was directly behind me. Just had to pivot a bit to wash something, then back to my stove or counter. Very easy and quick. The dishwasher was next to the sink, so that was a really nice triangle to work in between the stove, the sink, and the dishwasher. I had a drying rack and the occasional dirty dish by the sink, so I didn't like to prepare food there, I prefered to do most of my prepping on the island next to the stove so I could chop something up and then toss it right in the pan.

    If I put in 2 sinks, they'd end up being almost across from each other...my kitchen won't be big enough for that to work. I wish it was though, then I'd never have to turn around!

    3' of cleared space on each side will be plenty for what I need, though you did make me realize that the fridge will be on the right which is also the side where I prep, so there could potentially be some congestion on that side to think about. Thanks for that insight! I'll also have a long peninsula along the one side (serving as a separation between the kitchen and dining areas) that will have a large flat surface for when I bake or need a larger prep area.

    Didn't have to adapt to that kitchen, it was awesome. seriously... awesome. :-D

  • cpartist

    Have you considered posting your kitchen layout here? Just to possibly get some other ideas you might not have thought of? Of course you can take or leave everyone's ideas.

  • smileythecat

    There are numerous discussions on this site about downdrafts, lot of folks don't like them. I have had four in the last 3 houses. Currently have a KA that works pretty good, rises 18 inches, takes care of the back burners, not so much the front. In my experience,none of the three homes could have had a conventional setup due to the layout of the kitchen's ducting.

  • Anita Richardson
    I have a jennair cooktop with downdraft vented to outside. Have had for eleven years and love it. No problems
  • Matt

    Thank you smileythecat! It gets exhausting (no pun intended) when people consistently down talk the downdrafts. I wish more downdraft owners with positive things would speak out. We get it, hoods are far more efficient. But sometimes from either layout/construction of a home or the user experience of working on the island drives the need/desire for a downdraft. The alternative is nothing at all, and i found out the hard way what happens when you mention that on this board. So embrace it when people say they want a downdraft and help them make it happen, don't make them feel bad for wanting that.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    I had a telescoping down draft and Meile dual burner units. This was new build and i had to design that cabinet deeper to accommodate that downdraft. The under cabinet mechanisms are tough to manage. The performance was marginal and I would avoid if I build again. We have KA with downdraft in current rental. It is not effective and it has plenty of power. When on lowest setting it pulls gas flame and distorts heat under pan. It is in large island and sink behind. Has 4’ space to left and 3’ to right. Not enough space. The island is “L” shaped so I am not a fan of it in island especially if not total flat surface. A raised side of island is even more limiting. Erase your views on previous kitchen and really study this space. Last house we had huge island, flat uninterrupted surface with range and hood/vent on outside wall. Sink on that wall. Best layout ever!! Loved it. I really encourage you to rethink your kitchen. I have had every darn configuration of kitchen, having moved frequently for my corporate career. I speak from experience and in designing many kitchens. I would love to see your whole kitchen plan. You will get some great insights from people here even though some might not suit the golden nuggets will be worth it. Wish you the best and glad you posted this much so you could further your knowledge on these important, expensive decisions. Good for you!!!
  • Matt

    @Flo... Was the telescoping downdraft Miele brand as well? Just curious so i can look up thier offerings to see what drives a deeper than standard depth cabinet.

    HU-874585772 thanked Matt
  • Matt

    Nevermind i found info on the Miele units. They are almost twice as thick as say the Whirlpool brand like i bought. So i could see that forcing a deeper than 24" cabinet.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    Matt- No I didn’t use Meile downdraft. I can’t recall which brand I put in but depth was a problem on all at that time. This was a long time ago. It was new item so I was on cutting edge. Haha!
  • PRO
    RES 3d Sketches

    I've put those telescoping exhausts in houses and the owners don't seem to like to use them.

    I installed two 30"Jenn-Air downdraft ranges side by side 28 years ago against a very nice ft wide brick wall that the original coal fired stove sat against in 1891 because I didn't want to hide the brick. One has gas on top and the other has electric with a griddle; both have electric convection ovens. No problems with them yet.

    There was a removable ring in each system that allowed greater air flow and the 2 duct runs were not long so the fans move a lot of air. My wife says it makes the flames bend toward the intakes but its not much and I doubt it reduces the heat from the burners. The intake grilles provide a place to move a pot in a hurry.

    When we need a greater exchange of air, opening a door or window does it quickly. A 10 ft ceiling and high transom windows helps.

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  • barncatz

    I could be wrong but I thought that most downdrafts will not work with a slide in range - because the back of the range juts out (or some such reason). I thought the Best Cattura downdraft does work with slideins. I also have a vague recollection that there's a range mfg that offers a downdraft that works with their unit.

  • PRO
    RES 3d Sketches

    The gas and electric Jenn-Air downdraft ranges are slide-in.

    The Best Cattura stands 18" high and takes up quite a bit of space in the cabinet and appears to cost over $1,500 not counting installation.

    I've never seen an overhead hood that wasn't in my face or a head knocker. I don't even have wall cabinets in my kitchen.

    I would just buy the Jenn-Air and enjoy it.

  • opaone

    I wonder how many of the people on here who have downdraft systems that they say work so well are also houses that you walk in and smell stale odors from meals past and can't wait to leave the house. Or they get sick from poor indoor air quality. Or both.

    Downdraft systems simply do not work. If all someone does is boil water for beans-in-a-bag then they're fine. If it's for a house someplace where windows are open all day and the house gets an enormous amount of fresh air every day then they may be OK for an electric or induction range. Otherwise they are just not effective.

  • HU-874585772

    Saying that all downdraft systems are ineffective is a generalization. And I'm not a fan of over generalizing because it rarely holds true. Believe it or not, some people have great downdraft systems that work well! Maybe if you cook Kimchi or liver/onions... or if you have a tiny kitchen...you'd have a problem. But my kitchen was 27x13' and there was plenty of ventilation. My JennAir fan was effective..I could see the steam being sucked down into the vent...which was kind of neat to see the steam take a turn like that. The added bonus of having a downdraft is that it pulled the steam out of my way so I could reach across my pots without getting burned.


    That JennAir by the way was installed 24 years ago and still works perfectly. I felt that this system worked so much better than the traditional range/hood setup that I'd had my whole life, I wanted to replicate it in our new house. If I truly felt it was garbage and ineffective, I wouldn't be so determined to spend so much more money to do this. I do, however, wish I had written down the specifications of that fan system before I sold the place...just so I had a comparison of how powerful that fan was compared to other options because apparently there are a lot of bad downdraft systems out there if there's this much negativity towards them.


    Now, I would entertain a debate about whether a JennAir that has a downdraft installed between the burners is more effective than a system installed at the back of the stove... thus having less 'pull' on the steam from the front burners. Maybe that is where the issue lies.

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    Just look at the scientific papers on ventilation and flow dynamics. The Schlieren photography is very clear. Science very clearly shows that capture area is more important than CFM in ventilation. Overhead hoods start a 100 yard dash 80 yards ahead of downdrafts, simply because of that fact.

    The first thing that needs to be acknowledged in kitchen design is that downdrafts attempt to pull against naturally rising heat, odors, grease, steam, and smoke. A “capture area” for those cooking byproducts does not exist with a downdraft. The fan has to have triple air movement to overcome that immediate construction deficit.

    Downdrafts work better for the rear burners when they rise taller. They don’t work at all well for front burner cooking, where most people do their high heat cooking. They are not as effective as even a moderate CFM overhead fan.

    Because of the high CFM ratings needed to overcome those naturally rising cooking byproducts, all downdraft systems require Make Up Air systems. That adds another level of cost to one of the costliest choices in cooking ventilation. Many appliance salesmen are unwilling to kill their sales by mentioning that inconvenient impediment to both high BTU cooking choices and high CFM ventilation systems. The would rather let that be a surprise for the homeowner who has to scramble to comply.

    There are drawbacks to all decisions in design. Decisions made solely for aesthetics seem to have more regrets than those made to improve function. Lighting and ventilation typically receive little attention, as both functions aren’t as exciting as your choice of quartzite counter. Most people focus on the aesthetics of both rather than the functions of both. Focus on function first. It has its own beauty.

  • opaone

    "Saying that all downdraft systems are ineffective is a generalization. And I'm not a fan of over generalizing because it rarely holds true."


    No, it's actually basic physics. As Cook's Kitchen pointed out, the effluent rising from cooking is quite hot and has a lot of upward momentum. It takes an enormous amount of energy to overcome this momentum.


    For example she mentioned 'triple air movement', but even that's not nearly enough. It takes about 7 times as much airflow (CFM) just to make a 27” deep hood perform like a 30” hood, to simply bend the column of hot effluent a little. So, rather than 600 CFM you’d need about 4200 CFM. To bend this column of hot effluent enough to get even a moderate amount to be collected by a downdraft would require tens of thousands of CFM's.


    More: https://www.gardenweb.com/discussions/5161173/hood-faq


  • HU-874585772

    opaone... I love it even more that my JennAir defied physics!! That must be why they're $3,000.


    And the previous post is right about making decisions based on function. I have a good workflow with my design having the range on the island with a downdraft. If I move it to a more traditional spot against the wall, I'm going to lose my nice work triangle and end up with regrets on a kitchen that has a poor workflow. For me, super ventilation is not a higher priority than workflow. I'm not really sure what anyone is cooking that makes your homes smell so bad with residual cooking odors. I don't need an industrialized strength ventilation system for my stovetop...lol. This should work well enough for me, and isn't that what design is all about?


    I'm not here to debate which system is better than another. There's science behind it, I get it...I get it.. This type of system doesn't work for everyone and overheads are better..I get it. I've had a lot of great commenters on this post, and you've been awesome in bringing up some interesting points. It has been quite educational for sure! But somehwere along the way it became a debate about downdrafts being inferior without giving guidance on how to make the best decision on choosing one model over another. I'd welcome any advice on how to pick between different brands or different features. what kinds of specifications should I look for to get the best one I can get for the money. Because I need to pick one out, not feel shameful that I'm getting one.


    And Matt, good luck man, sounds like we're either going to love this or hate it!


  • dan1888

    A Best Cattura is going to give you the best shot.




    Induction requires less capacity because you aren't also dealing with waste heat like you'll have with gas. Bosch 800 or Benchmark slide-ins would be a choice. 17 levels of power control.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan

    I can't quite figure out, why this would be good on an island?? When the vent is up, it totally blocks views to the folks at the counter?? Maybe I'm missing something, or just totally against islands with ranges. This particular model/brand looks amazing and probably functions quite well if it isn't too noisy. What are the decibel ranges??

  • PRO
    RES 3d Sketches

    Capture efficiency" (CE) is a measure of the pollutants captured by an exhaust system. "Capture area" is related but is a measure of the hood size not a measure of capture efficiency and its effect is not consistent because of so many other factors.

    The studies by Singer & Deep at Berkeley Labs showed that "the hoods did better at capturing pollutants from the two back burners of the stove than from its front burners. Hoods that achieved airflows recommended by the Home Ventilating Institute’s HV1 standard showed capture efficiencies of about 80 percent or greater for back burners but only 60 percent or greater for the oven and 50 percent or greater for front burners. Open hoods had higher capture efficiency than those with grease screen- and metal-covered bottoms. The hood with the highest capture efficiency, exceeding 80 percent for front burners, was a model with a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners, but it generated sound levels too high for normal conversation. The capture efficiency of hoods meeting ENERGY STAR criteria was less than 30 percent for front and oven burners."

    "Conclusions - Exhaust pollutant capture efficiencies (CE) for common cooking exhaust devices vary substantially with airflow rate and device design, but not so much with installation height [14" to 30"] In these and previous experiments, the best CE was achieved for cooking on back cooktop burners at airflow settings in excess of 200 cfm. Installing standard hoods farther from the wall does not consistently improve performance for front cooktop burners but does harm CE for back burner use."

    [“Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods,“ by Woody Delp and Brett Singer]

    AS of 2018 manufacturers are are supposed to publish CE ratings but I have yet to see them. I can think of no reason downdraft systems can't meet or exceed the CE ratings of some of the common overhead systems at CFM ratings below 400 and therefore not be required to have a make-up air systemm. The CFM of the Jenn-Air downdraft range is 310.


    HU-874585772 thanked RES 3d Sketches
  • threelittlelights13

    I love my range in my island. We have the same set up in two houses and it’s fantastic! I cook breakfast nearly every day, sometimes lunch, and dinner 6 days a week. As long as the island is large enough and the layout is right, it’s great!!

    I understand why its not ideal for everyone, but the majority of the comments above are heavy on competitor sponsored science and clearly lack actual life experience.

    Anyway, we have a best cattura behind a kitchenaid induction range. The Best Cattura was the only one we found that could go behind a range. The majority of downdrafts are designed to go under a cooktop with the blower motor underneath. The blower motor on the cattura can be put in several different locations, in our case under the floor! Good luck!

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  • PRO
    Springtime Builders

    Please put health before less important design considerations. The science being discussed here is not "competitor sponsored". While limited, the research put out by LBNL in references above is very important. Gas range exhaust and cooking pollution should be a primary home health concern.

    Powerful exhaust fans in homes with other combustion appliances is dangerous.

    These are health-safety issues that are so important, building codes are looking into further regulation of vent hood efficiency in addition to the > 400CFM Make Up Air MUA requirement. This is serious stuff with public health implications.

    Downdraft's paradox is that to capture efficiently as a vent hood, you have to crank CFM up to ridiculous levels. This can be dangerous if the home has other combustion appliances, even if they are considered "sealed combustion".

    Perfection is rarely possible in construction, but it's helpful to know best practices. Most effective pollution removal starts with a wall-backed vent hood with an inverted "bowl". The hood area should cover most of the front burners at a relatively low height ~30"? Safest airflow seems to be in 200-400 CFM range.

    For high performance, follow the engineer's advice from the bottom of this document with >400CFM MUA system configured something like this:





    For high performance 200-400 CFM, that's easier and safer, you can just do this:


    MUA is supplied at 10% greater rate in tempered area to ensure vent hood sucks.

  • PRO
    Jeffrey R. Grenz, General Contractor

    Installed, replaced and fixed many downdrafts as my parents loved the concept, great for those who never turn on the vent.


    I haven't put them in a home for 20+ years.


    I would consider a flush ceiling mounted vent. Google it.

  • saccharum

    We had a Jenn-Air downdraft that failed catastrophically: while baking something in the oven it cranked itself up to 500 degrees and would not turn off. We had to shut the breaker to get it to turn off. We'll never go back to Jenn-Air (or Whirlpool).

  • cpartist

    I would consider a flush ceiling mounted vent. Google it.

    Those work as long as the ceiling is 8' high or lower.

  • PRO
    The Cook's Kitchen

    Ceiling vents have a whole host of issues, starting with inadequate capture area, and a difficult filter change operation that means that it rarely happens. That creates another set of issues. They don’t work nearly as well as their advertisers would have you believe. That goes for most new “innovative” ventilation systems that try to get around traditional venting technology.

  • PRO
    RES 3d Sketches

    My 2 Jenn-Air ranges are 28 years old and have had no issues. Everything breaks eventually and the timing is often a matter of luck (except for Viking). Jenn-Air is made by Whirlpool and its sister brands are Kitchen Aid, Maytag and Amana.

  • saccharum

    They must have built them better 28 years ago! Ours was less than 10 years old :(

  • PRO
    RES 3d Sketches

    The technical issues are interesting but to remove stove top pollutants from your house its necessary to turn on the exhaust fan every time you turn the range on. I suspect most people only turn it on occasionally or when the air in the kitchen is uncomfortable. Extreme situations are better served by opening a window or door when its too late to capture pollutants.

    It seems inappropriate to judge exhaust systems by stricter standards than people use to determine when to turn them on. I keep turning the downdraft fans on and my wife turns them off (although she will often open the back door or climb on a stool to open a transom window) so the entire issue of exhaust fans in our house is moot.

  • HU-874585772

    @saccharum, nothing seems to be made to last anymore! It's sad. :-(

  • Sue
    What an interesting post! In my current home I have an island KA downdraft and I’m not a fan. I have a gas stove and the draft pulls the flame over so I have to move my pot over. The smells just don’t seem to leave. In my new house I have a real hood that sucks all the smells out!
  • PRO
    Springtime Builders

    Effective vent hood operation will hopefully catch on with experiences like Sue's. You don't appreciate it until you live with it. Opening windows seems crude for new construction. Designers can address noise with inline or exterior mounted fans but good habits need to be developed for remembering to turn them off. It would be nice to coordinate a quiet fan with a light or other indicator.




  • cpartist

    I turn my fan on the minute I turn on one of the cooktop hobs. I have a new house and want to keep everything clean and smelling good for a long, long time.

  • PRO
    Springtime Builders

    cpartist, I think you went with induction cooktop. Did the Houzz forums contribute to this decision? Has anyone suggested to OP that induction has become a better choice than gas?


    Does the same design mentality that leads to poor performing island/peninsula cooktop venting lead to cooktop choices that increase cleaning needs and indoor air pollution?

  • eandhl2

    I can speak from experience. First a Jen Air, noisy down draft So so effective. Loved the island range & didn't want anything blocking the view. Next we had a Thermador range with a telescope vet. Worked perfect on back burners, I used a wooden spoon to tilt a lid directing Steam to vent from front burners. This was a good improvement from the JA. Sold & no island, range on back wall vent up and out about 14 inches. I admit this is the best.

    HU-874585772 thanked eandhl2
  • PRO
    Springtime Builders

    I think that touches on the main design problem inherent in this post. Blocking view of very small area should be considered less important than occupant health.

  • cpartist

    cpartist, I think you went with induction cooktop. Did the Houzz forums contribute to this decision?

    No I wanted one 9 years ago when we bought our condo here but at the time I was concerned because DH has a pacemaker and at the time they still weren't sure. Now they know the newer pacemakers are fine with induction (have to keep the pacemaker at least 6" from the surface. LOL.) So this time went with one. I'm in FL so wanted something that wouldn't generate heat in the kitchen.

    Has anyone suggested to OP that induction has become a better choice than gas?

    Definitely a better, cleaner, cooler choice.

  • barncatz

    I wasn't referencing a downdraft range which I understand are slideins because we owned one.

    I was trying to answer the OP, who asked if ALL slidein ranges work with separate pop up downdrafts and I was answering, "no". I didn't see that anyone had answered that yet. Another poster after me answered the same, "no", but more clearly.

    So you can't buy, for example, the Samsung induction range and put any old downdraft behind it unless you want a space of at least a few inches between the back of the range and the downdraft. That gap will have to be covered by some material.

    I'm crabby. Time for dinner.

    HU-874585772 thanked barncatz

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