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hoang_ton

Princesse Charlène de Monaco - 2019 - Zone 8B

Hoang Ton
last month

Big beautiful fragrant blooms. Great as a cut flowers. Good disease resistant. Love this rose. I just bought 3 more to form a big bush.



Rose - Princesse Charlène de Monaco · More Info


Rose - Princesse Charlène de Monaco · More Info


Rose - Princesse Charlène de Monaco · More Info


Comments (17)

  • Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA

    Hoang Ton,

    Mine is young, just planted in 2019, and impressed me quite a bit. If it continues to put on size as it did last year, it will be a large bush. I hope it is sufficiently winter hardy here not to get much winter dieback. Black spot was not an issue so far with my PCdM.

    I hope yours stays on course for you, too.

    A lot of very good roses are coming out of Meilland these days.

    Moses

    Hoang Ton thanked Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA
  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw

    Beautiful color! Time to check it out.

    Hoang Ton thanked Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
  • Lisa Adams

    Gorgeous, Hoang! PCDM is one of my very favorite cutting roses. I have two of them, even though they will grow nearly 12F tall, if allowed. (Yes, 12F tall!) She takes well to frequent pruning, thank goodness. Lisa

    Hoang Ton thanked Lisa Adams
  • dianela7bnorthal

    Gorgeous, thank you for sharing this beauty. I got 3 own roots this fall and have been worried that I should have gone with some grafted one. Almost all my own root hybrid teas look so weak and small here so far. Your video and pictures look amazing.

    wow Lisa can’t wait to see your rose some time. Are your bushes narrow and tall or getting wide? I planted mine around 3 feet apart and maybe I should have planted them closer.

    Moses is your PCdM grafted or own root? I am hoping they will do well own root, but I haven’t had that much luck with own root hybrid teas so far.

    Hoang Ton thanked dianela7bnorthal
  • Hoang Ton

    Lisa, yikes! My PCDM is on fortuniana rootstock which mean it will be a monster.

  • rifis (zone 6b-7a NJ)

    Moses:

    Did you spray your PCdM for BS prevention this past year?

  • Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA

    Dianela,

    My PCdM is own root, which with my climate (shorter growing season), and winter effects, should help keep it in bounds, size wise, but time will tell. It is reported to get big. I wonder if it could be used as a short climber?

    The Kordes line of short climbers, Arborose, like my young Quick Silver, is definitely exceeding its supposed 5-7 root cane length already, by a couple feet, 9', and I predict it will continue to enlarge as it ages to a 12' wide climber. Not complaining whatsoever, though, just reporting my results.

    Moses

  • dianela7bnorthal

    Thank you Moses for your reply. It makes me feel great she is doing well own root for you. I love hearing that it likes to be big a big girl, hopefully that means it has plenty of vigor on its own roots. I planted Amazing grace, star of the Nile, Peace and Princess Elize own root and have not gotten good results so far.

  • Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA

    Dianela,

    I hope Princess CdM's vigor, and ability to get large, as Lisa from California reports it gets 12' tall for her, translates into extra good winter hardness because from now on, no roses in my garden will get winter protection.

    Actually, my PCdM was planted as a liner just last year, and is looking very good as of today, but 9 weeks of cold weather are still ahead, with a normal yearly low reached of -5F (not yet!), in my zone 6b, and February is the coldest month here. If she pulls through, and puts on good size this coming 2020 growing season, I will be further amazed at her. Then, as an older bush I can breathe easier next winter, 2020-21, Lord willing, she being more mature, and be potentially better able to fend of any possible winter kill.

    Moses

  • Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA

    Rifis,

    I did spray PCdM with the Bayer Complete Insect Control for rose midge fly, along with the Bayer Disease Control for Roses....., both mixed together in the same spray solution: 1 T. Insect, and 1.5 T. Disease, together per gallon of water, and sprayed every 2weeks, more or less. Less as the season wound down to its end because of sheer dog tiredness of spraying. A battery powered sprayer should keep me on task to the end this coming year. I hope so.

    My judgement is that although she was sprayed, she may have fared rather well without spraying.

    I have found that young roses show less disease immunity than older ones, so PCdM's obvious vigor will only make it more disease resistant in time. I have NOT found midge fly resistance to improve with a bush's maturity. Midge hits ALL roses of any age equally savagely. In fact, the more healthy and robust a rose bush is, it gets especially intense midge pressure.

    Moses

  • rifis (zone 6b-7a NJ)

    “Like” still not working with my device.

    Thank you, Moses.

  • rifis (zone 6b-7a NJ)

    I’m thinking: mixing the 2 would obligate you to spray more than the developing bud for midge control, or miss much of the foliage for BS control. No?

  • Lisa Adams

    I wish mine were own root. They are on Dr. Huey, I believe. Mine have remained narrow, growing only about 3’ wide. Both of mine grow straight up, sky high if I let her. New canes are bendable, and I’ve had some incredible blooms on perfectly straight laterals of 3’ in length. Lisa

  • Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA

    Rifis,

    Extra spraying of the tips is not necessary for midge. More is not better. Just enough is best, any more is just waste.

    On roses like: Quietness, Earth Angel, Quick Silver, etc., which get no black spot here, when it's their turn to be sprayed, only to about 4* down on the developing tip is sprayed. These growing tips are not sprayed any more at all once the developing bud thereon is garden pea sized. Midge no longer lays its eggs on tips at that state of maturity here. Essentially, if there are no vulnerable growing tips at all on one of my black spot proof roses, it gets no spray applied at that session.

    The method I use for midge control also keeps rose slugs and cabbage butterfly caterpillar damage to about zero, since they target upper growth also.

    The most midge vulnerable growing tips are those growing from basal breaks. They grow so quickly, and although the Bayer insecticide is systemic, it does not translocate to new, additional growth made after the last spray session. It only is absorbed into plant tissue with which it initially makes contact. Since basal breaks grow so quickly, just a few days after a spraying, they are vulnerable to midge attack. Every two week spray sessions are not frequent enough for basal breaks getting adequate protection.

    Moses

  • rifis (zone 6b-7a NJ)

    Moses:

    When you spray your more black spot-prone roses with the insecticide/fungicide mixture you have prepared, do you spray only the growing tips which are most midge-prone, and avoid spraying the rest of the foliage?


    Interesting: on a tablet such as mine, not only can I not “ like” a comment, but I also cannot even see who has “liked” ( using a “ like”-enabling device) a comment.

  • Kenneth zone 7A - Southern Middle TN

    At this point what rose don’t I have lol I have this beauty and I love her smell .

  • Moses, Western PA., zone 5/6, USA

    Rifis,

    The black spot prone roses get a full bush, top to bottom spray with both the insecticide and fungicide mixed together in the same solution. Only the black spot proof roses get the growing tip spraying, and then only until when the growing tip's flower bud reaches pea sized.

    After reaching that size it seems is not hospitable to midge maggot development there. I think it may be too tough for the maggot to eat, or a natural defensive chemical may have developed by then at the immature bud, or perhaps the scent trail given off by the growing tip the female midge fly normally follows to locate it, is no longer given off by the maturing tip. These are all unknowns to me, just thoughts. I do know that once a green, developing bud at a growing tip gets to a nice green pea size, it is safe from further midge damage.

    Moses

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