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Help me spruce up my orange brick home!

Jo Shi
24 days ago

Hi there,


My fiance and I are looking to add some curb appeal to our generic orange brick home. The roof was recently replaced and we'd prefer not to paint the brick (but would consider it). Any suggestions regarding paint colors, landscaping, etc. are welcome!




Comments (61)

  • PRO
    Yardvaark
    24 days ago

    In the seond picture, it seems there is a tortoise examining the trash. Where could this town be? The entrance would be more inviting if lighter. Consider painting door and surrounds white.

    Consider placing annuals below windows for a windowbox effect. Fill in around it with groundcover. Place another groundcover around the tree.



    Jo Shi thanked Yardvaark
    Featured Answer
  • nanakeroyd
    19 days ago

    Just a few examples of front yard enhancements







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  • nanakeroyd
    19 days ago

    Examples of sage green with orange or reddish orange brick





  • lynnwinkler
    18 days ago

    Get rid of the fake shutters. Go with a sage green door and trim. Remove all the leggy shrubs that block the windows and replace them with low growing perennials or shrubs. Put your garbage cans away.

  • janzian
    18 days ago

    Your house it adorable, congratulations! paint that garage door.

  • terrib962
    18 days ago

    The brick is nice, but the black roof is in a different color-group. So - best option to get rid of the situation of house and roof clashing is to paint the brick. It is nice being orange, but a brown roof would have blended better. I say paint the brick a shade of white or off-white and all the trim around the windows and doors a dark charcoal - that will really pop with the contrast. And remove the horrid fake shutters. If you have shutters, they have to be as wide as the windows to be like real ones. They are so 80's and ugly. I would add a flower bed along the driveway and more beds somehow and less grass. Your roof cannot be changed at this point, so everything needs to blend with the black/grey. I have looked at many photos of houses over the years and yours just does not pop. Read up on painting brick - that is the best thing to do at this point. Then choose a color for the door - any color - red, blue, great, teal, pink, any color to contrast with the off-white house and black roof and trim. Have fun!

  • liberalie
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Gutters downspouts are not trim... paint them the same color as the brick so they will

    disappear.... same with garage doors, hide them with trellises or paint them same color as

    brick and add great lighting. Use paver stones the same color as roof on a wider front

    walkway. Pop out a new paler blue front door with glass and a great lantern and add pale blue

    wider shutters. Remove old

    shrubs near house and come out about ten feet with a low circular garden of dwarf

    gardenias and flowers. It is a darling house.

  • jmlg
    18 days ago

    Clearly you need tough skin to ask for advice!


    Personally, I would not paint the brick (or at least not all the brick) - it is part of the original architecture. While painting may give the building a fresh look, it does not add much value and creates a maintenance liability. I would be inclined to work on bringing more interest and colour to the garage door, front door and the trim across the facade.


    It's a little hard to see the entrance in this photo, but in my opinion, it should stand out much more than it appears to - perhaps that garage side wall leading to the front door could get a treatment similar to the area around the doorway (as it is now or with changes to both areas).


    I think you could do some work on the front garden, which has lots of potential. One idea would be to open up the front door area and add paving right across the front of the house, with perhaps some potted standards beside the windows. You might also consider planting all the way along the (expanded) path to the front door.


    If you were to add a raised garden bed to the front of the house (say, 18 inches high) using low retaining walls positioned a little further forward than the garage (say, 6 feet or so parallel to the house facade), you would de-emphasize the garage and add a nice feature to your entrance, as well as a view from inside the house. With low plants in the bed you would enhance the light inside, with taller plants add more privacy. Depending on the aspect and the streetscape, you might like to add a seat to the paved area between the bed and the front wall.


    I would also think about more planting at the front of the property. If you're looking to update your look without major changes the building, you could use a more contemporary style of landscaping.


    Good luck - I think you should be able to update and enhance this house without too much expensive structural work.


  • jantrader
    18 days ago

    Change the garage door! That huge expanse of white, no windows is not attractive. I agree sage green goes very well with brick. Landscaping goes a long way, expand it out into the yard for sure.

  • HU-517240727
    18 days ago

    I would build out a wide (at least 36 inch path) curving from about 7 feet from the garage door and sweep the curve of the path to the left corner of the house with the double window, You can lay out the curve with a garden hose -- start at the edge of the driveway (seven feet from garage door). Where you have the planter at the right corner of the garage door I would create a small curved crescent planting area to soften the edge and guide to the curved path.

    I agree that the window shrubs need to be relocated. Blue is the opposite of orange in color design, although the sage green is complementary as well. I would use a muted blue/green for trim and paint the white wall space around the front door (to make white door pop).

    Right now the angles of the garage and the narrow walkway to the door are too sharp. if you are walking up to the door from the driveway try imagining walking on a path --swinging to the right and stepping further from the house and then curving gently to the edge of the front of the house -- the 8th picture from the top echoes this idea (brick tudor with lamppost)

  • cda1028
    18 days ago

    Change the garage door. Right now it’s the major feature, too big, too white, too utilitarian. Sage green is lovely and a classic look with orange brick. In our downtown residential area, piedmont NC, many houses are getting front yard sitting areas of all sorts that people are treating like traditional roofed front porches. They don’t have to be next to the house, just a spot that looks socially welcoming. The whole mood of the town is positive because of them, especially since we’re home and outside craving connection given the current pandemic.

  • tartanmeup
    18 days ago

    If this roof colour isn't optimal with this brick, it's not glaringly obvious the way a solid black roof would have been. From what I see on my screen, I wouldn't be tempted to paint the brick because of this particular roof. Brick outlasts a roof. If you are tempted to change the colour of your brick because of this roof, you might want to look into mineral paints like Romabio to "stain" or limewash the brick. From what I've read, these products are less maintenance than regular paint. I think the suggestions of widening the entrance path, working on the landscaping and painting the garage door will do wonders to enhance your house's curb appeal. I think Yardvaark's comment that the "entrance seems pinched" is on the money. That's the first thing one notices. Remedy that and you're 90% there. If it matters any, generic is not a term I'd use to describe your house. :) Good luck with your decisions. Hope you'll share pictures of your "after".

  • Brmmac
    18 days ago

    After reading all these wonderful comments, three key and fairly inexpensive recommendations were made. ONE) removing the tulip brush. TWO) German smearing the brick. (see photos on Houzz). THREE) keeping landscaping low (boxwood hedge) maintenance free below windows.. Definitely use a sage accent on your shutters, façade accents, and front door. Your planters could be a black accent for your roof. If you decide to paint your garage doors accents to tone them down and shutters use Sherwin Williams Resilience paint it's great for this job. Check out those German Smear photos before you paint. Painting the front of home will be your biggest change.

  • katbradbury
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Landscaping is definitely not my forte, but I love the ideas from yardvaark and jmlg. First big impact would be simple foundation plantings, annuals and ground cover to hide the tree roots would make a big impact. Replacing a garage door would make a huge impact, but be very expensive. Creating a curved walk would be beautiful, but require jackhammering out the existing walk.

    Your house is adorable. What stands out to me is the WHITE trim and downspouts, large flat expanse of garage door, small shutters on the large window (shutters should be 1/2 the width of the window) , the strange trim above that same window and the spotlight above the garage door. Trim paint, new shutters and trim over the large window and a substantial lantern style light fixture over the garage door would do wonders. In my experience, most people use light fixtures that are much too small for the space.

    I would spend some considerable time driving around neighborhoods and pouring over exterior photos on Houzz to get an idea of brick/trim color combinations that you like - there is no right answer.

  • wolverleen
    18 days ago

    Your home is beautiful! The orange brick and slate grey roof are light and uplifting colors. Maybe use the grey color above the front window to paint the shutters and garage and eliminate the white. My parents have this same garage/front door approach and they have an expanded low lying landscape in front of the entrance that is very inviting. See pic below. Extend the landscape to the red line and fill with low lying landscape. Remove the shrubs that are too tall across the front of home. I like the flower pots on either side of garage. Looks like you removed the tall shrubs on either side. Nice improvement. Very pretty!

  • Bernadette
    18 days ago

    This house says "Welcome to my Garage!", and it's not clear at all where the front door is located. It is not very welcoming to people because the emphasis is on car storage. Check out the Houzz boards on making your front entrance for humans more prominent and make the garage door recede into the background. The soft landscaping will fall into place once the hard landscaping has changed to put the focus on "Welcome to our Home".

  • skyarts
    18 days ago

    I would paint the garage door the same soft grey as the trapezoid shape above it (inexpensive) or (more expensive) replace it with a door which has a row of paned windows to tie in with the house windows and break up the expanse. Wolvereen's gardening plans will also help bring out the front of the house - but I would shape the garden with a concave curve rather than the convex curve he/she has proposed. Then you just need to add some floral colour, You likely have a lot of dry shade from that mature tree, so coloured foliage such as coral bells, hakone grass would keep the interest going 3 out of 4 seasons. And paint the front door with a pop of colour.

  • debc25
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Maybe you could put the tall plants in the planters by the garage instead of the lower flowers. They are too tall in front of the windows and block the windows. I like the keystone design over the window. Maybe paint the garage door something other than white. It really make the house look like it's all garage. It has become the centerpiece of the house. Have you considered azaleas (low ones) in the bed around the front of the house? It would brighten up the front when they bloom. At our former home in Louisiana, we had large azaleas in front of our home that were very overgrown. I trimmed them back drastically and they came back beautifully. The color in the spring was so nice. Just keep them low. If you get Encore Azaleas, they will bloom a second time later in the year.

  • nanakeroyd
    18 days ago

    Hey there Jo. I am sure after reading all the comments that you probably want to go cover your head under the blankets and go back to sleep. Let’s breathe for a moment. Look at the positives. Do you love your house? Then it is simply a matter of giving it some TLC. The house has some really cute lines to it. The gray roof is fine. The shrubs and landscaping are in need and there is no easy way to blink and fix that. Dig, my dear. Carefully remove the things that detract from the look you want to achieve. Take out the shrubs and start over with the landscaping. Pressure wash the driveway And sidewalk. Clean the windows. Make sure that tree is not going to mess up plumbing with those giant roots. First things first. Now.......let’s look at the positives.....new roof...great. Gray? Not a problem. Seriously look at the sage green family for color contrast as the base color in sage green is gray. I personally don’t dislike the shutters and sage would add some nice contrast. Take the bricks out from around the pots in front of brick longside the garage doors. Remove the non matching pots.. looks like you are on a culdesac from the curve of the street. Don’t take pictures of your trash in front of the house....reminds me of love it or list it. Find someplace to stash those cans out of sight. Now.....focus.....look at the blank slate.....no shrubs, no cutesy stuff...... now ask yourself...what do I like about this house and what do I want to emphasize? Do you want the house to say Welcome Home when you drive up? Ok...if so then what would make you and your fiancé smile when you drive up to the house? I grew up in Dallas. There are some seriously great neighborhoods therefor you to reference in your endeavors. I suggested Highland Park and the Azalea District in Tyler....beautiful areas but there are others....University Park, also around the Hillcrest area as well and I am sure many others since I havent lived there in 50 years. Turtle creek, Swiss Ave......old established areas with incredible homes and landscaping. You can take a plain house and with serious effort create an entire new personality for the house. I leaned years ago a trick.....if you like upscale on a beer budget then with good taste and a few really good pieces whether to the decor inside or out you can bring the entire look up a notch or even higher. You need low shrubs, color contrast, and if you are using pots on either side of the garage door they must match and be planted with matching whatever’s.....look at sites such as Frontgate for pots. They have some nice square ones that would do nicely. A nice door mat with some class is great. Think classic and upscale. Doesn’t have to cost a fortune but make it look Neiman Marcus. Think of easy maintenance......you are probably young and have other things to worry about besides the yard.....if it is too complex it will drive you crazy unless gardening is your thing like it is for me.......I have thrown out several suggestions n several posts but you have to take away the negative before adding the positive and don’t make rash decisions....think long term. take your time........hugs

  • nanakeroyd
    18 days ago

    Forgot to mention.......with good design ideas and attention to detail, the cost of improvements even when a realtor says plants do not raise the house value, actually can give you more bang for the buck when you sell one day and most people do over time. We bought the house we just moved from 8 years prior. Yes we did some interior painting and normal repairs and replaced some carpet, upgraded the closets with wood organizers and a few cosmetic projects. However, the biggest thing we did was to transform the little haunted looking house on the hill to something that looked like it walked out of the pages of Veranda. We bought the house for $189,000.........we sold it 8 years later after my gardening endeavors and hard work by both my husband and myself for the highest price per sq ft in the entire 9000 house subdivision. It sold in one day. Soooo, the moral if there is one is to love your house and give it a nice dress to wear and it will love you back.

    Everything that is planted we did ourselves...every design was our own....we bought it when we were in our 60s...we are now in our 70s......the selling price....$313000. Not a bad profit for 8 years!


  • Lizzy L.
    18 days ago

    I would paint the brick white, and the shutters a dark gray. Others on here have good advice about landscaping.

  • Diana Allocco
    18 days ago

    Black shutters - would make a huge difference while you save for more expensive fixes.

  • Martha Bailey
    18 days ago

    Dig out that old shrubbery and start with a few basic (boxwood or yaupon) shrubs for foundation planting.

    Paint the shutters black. I think you will be pleased.

  • skmom
    18 days ago

    Cute home with lots of potential! I would paint all of the trim, shutters, and garage door some kind of color, I’d check out some kind of green- and sage green would probably be at the top of my list to consider. I’d paint the downspout next the garage and walkway a matching color from the brick so it visually blends in, but the gutter on the roofline would be the trim color. I’d get a nice, decorative light above the garage because the spot lights don’t look good. Not sure yet what color I’d paint the front door, but not the trim color, something to coordinate with it though. Your garage door is nice, it just needs to not be white. I’d get rid of the trimmed bushes that are blocking the windows... I know they took time and attention to train them up that way, but they were just placed in a poor location and detract from the house instead of boosting its looks. I would also change the bed shape to allow for more flowers. I like the renditions already offered up. I like your pots by the garage, but I’d change the color of the pots out. (Did you get them from Costco? I have the same ones, LOL!) Anyways, I think the red pot isn’t doing the orange brick any favors, I’d probably spray paint them chocolate brown or something. Get rid of the bricks around the flowerpots, it looks haphazard, nice stone pebbles in that area so you don’t get mud splashed around would look good though since it’s such a small area.

  • Jonny Quest
    18 days ago

    I think your home is very beautiful it just needs color and landscaping to make it yours.


    How long do you plan on staying in your home? How much maintenance do you want?,Do you have Any gardening skills and do you want to take the time maintaining a lush garden or would you prefer to spend your time and cash on other pursuits? I‘d answer those questions first.


    Painting brick is a nice idea but you’ve now changed a maintenance free surface to one that will occasionally need painting to look fresh. I don’t advise it.


    What you may consider first is looking for color on the shutters, keystones, front door and garage door to tone down the orange of your brick and which complements the roof color. Consider using more than one color on windows to add dimension If this is something that fits into your budget.


    I understand your plight with the orange brick. The brick on my Chicago-land 60s tri-level are a salmon color but when I decided to switch to vinyl siding (low maintenance) I chose a taupe siding and then used a cream color for the windows and storm doors, and a deep red for the doors. My doormats and planter pots are all black.


    in terms of landscaping removing the existing foundation plants is needed. These were badly cared for (horrible pruning) and I’m not sure they can be saved. I am not going to recommend plants because I don’t know where you are located. Some have mentioned azaleas but if you’re not in the warmer zones of the US, these will not Survive. There are azaleas for northern climates but are not as showy as those in the south. I’ve tried them and they were a disappointment in my yard.


    But more than anything take into account how much time you want to spend tending your garden before you begin ripping things out or planning a garden. Determine if you can find a good landscaping company to tend your garden if you don’t want to do it yourself. Spend some time looking at their work.


    Look at what your neighbors have done and let that also be a guide for which plants will do well in your yard. At some point shrubs may need to be pruned and perennials divided. Consider this as part of routine maintenance.l and who will do it.


    I agree with another poster that the tree may damage your home’s foundation. The previous owners of my home planted a river birch within 8‘ of the foundation. I’m sure when initially planted the look was beautiful but I inherited the foundation issues and repairs that come with such a large tree planted so closely to a structure.


    Think about the style of home landscape you like but consider if it suits the style of your home. I love cottage but maintaining my cottage garden is a lot of work. Explore what you like and go beyond what’s in houzz in terms of garden style. Houzz has beautifully designed garden spaces but not much in terms of how homeowners will maintain those spaces. Also think about where you will be storing the tools needed to take care of your garden space.


    Also in terms of gardening there is no hard and fast rule that says all landscaping needs to be done at one time. Make a plan and then add different things each year. If you work with a landscape designer mention this to that person especially if you are doing most of the install yourself.


    Think about your climate as well and how much rain you receive so that you can minimize supplemental watering once your plants are established. It’s expensive to do it and you may not be able to do that depending on your locale. Also make sure your garden beds are designed so that if you need to do supplemental watering you have an accessible source.


    when you are selecting plants it’s a good idea to have seasonal interest for all four seasons. Azaleas are wonderful but unless Encore type they only bloom in spring. And that’s assuming azaleas will work in your climate.


    Don’t assume local nurseries and big box stores are your only sources of plant material. Mail order and local garden clubs are also a great source of plants and information.


    consider incorporating hardscape into your landscape design. This could be walkways, stones, or anything that isn't plant material.


    Consider if you want to use the space or if you just want to provide a beautiful face to your home.


    my response is probably heavily geared toward landscaping but that’s like because I am a bit of plant nerd and love transforming my space using plant material.

  • Jonny Quest
    18 days ago

    One last thing you need to do something with water draining off roof. The downspout on walkway to front door is to close to your home. This likely contributed to the problems with the concrete. Consider moving to an area where water will drain further away from house preferably into your landscape rather than washing water into your municipal sewers (or minimize it).

  • ladas
    18 days ago

    Don’t paint the brick! There’s no end to the upkeep. When you replace the landscaping pay attention to the mature size of the new plants. You have a fairly narrow space on either side of that window, so don’t put in anything that will need heavy pruning to fit the space. Same issue with under the window, which is not that far above ground level.

  • sef715
    17 days ago

    Your house has a lot of potential - congratulations!

    I would first paint the trapezoid above the garage to match the roof and remove the eagle mounted up there, so that area blends in instead of stands out! It detracts from everything -

    I agree with needing new garage door. It’s so prominent that windows in it would break it up and make it look more like an extension of the house. Wood would be a warm and interesting look.

    Perhaps make the path to the door a different material than the driveway, such as using a warm, natural stone that echoes those around the garden beds. This change will delineate the entryway from the driveway.

    I say keep the brick - and work with the roof you have. I agree that sage would look great, with real shutters, which should each be 1/2 width of the windows to be authentic. That would add tremendous curb appeal. You can find many different styles of shutters - to reflect the style you want to have.

    If in the budget, new windows would also help - less panes and on the outside of the glass, with a dark color would add some pop and tie in the roof.

    Love all of the landscaping ideas above!

    Best budget fixes are paint and landscaping (i’m all for less lawn).

    Lots of comments = many ideas to choose from :) Prioritize your projects and all of a sudden everything will come together and look exactly how you want it to.

    Best wishes!

  • carol beachlady
    17 days ago

    Remove the overgrown shrubs out front. Extend the front garden beds to create a landscape of lower plants, colorful annuals, which can be enjoyed from the street and those 2 rooms on the front. Create a paved patio area linking the front garden, the driveway and the front door. Run the gutter from the garage roof under the front walk out to the lawn. If there is a little slope, perhaps a rain garden would work. Rain water would be reabsorbed, rather than running off to the street. Front door now is in a hidden alcove and not welcoming. Not sure what that is above the garage door. If those are floodlights, please remove, and install more subtle landscape lighting. Imagine coming up to the front door in the evening for a party and those floodlights are in your face - ! A new color scheme for shutters and wood trim.

  • briandbec
    17 days ago

    First thing I noticed was the shutters. Come up with a dark accent color to paint those shutters And the downspouts, probably based on the color of the roof. You can paint the door the same color or go bold as an accent, like lemon or plum. Just stay away from the blue of the flowers In the pot by the garage. It really makes the orange stand out. And those hedges - they make the windows look like they have push broom mustaches.

  • jlj48
    17 days ago

    To begin, remove tall shrubs, paint front door white or replace, remove red planter and add landscape lighting. Then stand back and see where you are.

  • nanakeroyd
    17 days ago

    I have posted several comments but I decided to show an example from my own home we bought last Fall before my husband’s triple bypass. Attention to detail is so Important and can make or break what you are trying to Achieve. This is our front door currently and I finally now that my husband has recovered have had a chance to spruce up the entrance.


    This house does not have a porch like our last house across the front of the house but instead a small covered area much like yours Jo. The wreath and mat from Frontgate, the bench an old one we got 10 plus years ago from Sam’s. Yes, the original cushions. The urns just purchased because we had to leave our last ones when we sold that house. A new porch light and a plaque given as a gift from a dear neighbor in the past. I wanted the entrance to say hello, welcome even with Covid Everywhere. A refuge from the storm. I think it works.




    Last porch and tried for same effect.



    House before the porch house........remember, what you see when you are at the front entrance should say, this is who we are.


    Welcome.

  • Little Bug
    17 days ago

    Jonny Quest??!! I remember you!! 😁

  • pennycooll14
    16 days ago

    I love your brick house. I am not a pro but my humble advice is to take out the shrubs that covers your home. As your home is flat they make it look overgrown and rundown. Yes ! Definitely some painting here and there on your trimmings and garage door. Organize also your area for garbage collection

  • Brenda McCulley
    14 days ago

    There have been many great suggestions for your landscaping. Don't get too hung up on trying to sort through them all. Landscaping can be ever changing. Do the basics and gradually add to it. Don't be afraid to move a planting if it's not working where originally placed. Your house is adorable. Now I have to go back and read all the comments to get ideas for my own house and the garage door!


  • Margie Kieper
    14 days ago

    I would remove the bushes that are in the way of the windows and replace with things that would grow low (not above the bottom of the windows). If the brick is too orange (I am with you on that!) maybe you could whitewash it that would only leave a small amount of the original color showing.

  • Justin Samuel
    13 days ago

    Why not paint your house and trim white, keep the shutters put something vines can grow up on the side of the garage by the front door and to the left of the window on the far right. That would give your house a cute European farmhouse look.

  • Justin Samuel
    13 days ago

    The vines also would give more of a safe feeling, as if your house was “protected” by them. And I think the garage door looks great the way it is if you painted the brick/siding white

  • Justin Samuel
    13 days ago

    And maybe paint your door the same color as your shutters.

  • Justin Samuel
    13 days ago

    Regarding the landscaping, you don’t need anything too much because the vines would take care of that. So on the far right, I would do a row of hydrangea bushes, and in front of the bump out, put a row of three large shrubs (as long as the shrubs come up to the window and the hydrangeas come up to about a quarter of the right window) the shrubs would look good in a dark green, and on the sides of the garage door, you could put 2 flower pots with some pale pink or red flowers to create a good soft color pop. Wow, now that I think about it your home could look amazing!

  • Justin Samuel
    13 days ago

    The fact that there wouldn’t be any curves, would give your house an organized, healthy, and natural look. Plus it would make your landscaping easier to maintain.

  • Justin Samuel
    13 days ago

    Style is always better than contemporary.

  • Justin Samuel
    12 days ago

    Another thing for your landscaping, is you should plant some simple bushes around your tree. Something that adds good balance through out the yard. Also for the mulch, a dark brown or black would go great.

  • wolverleen
    12 days ago

    Following on to my post from Jun 24. Here is a pic of a similar home entry with the door inset and the landscape extended. I think this looks so welcoming. Good luck!

  • Justin Samuel
    11 days ago

    You probably don’t want to add any large curves because your ranch is skinny enough it will just make it look messy, especially the bump out.

  • nanakeroyd
    11 days ago

    Usually, I don’t comment too much in regards to others posts but I have a couple of things that I disagree with from above posts. Your house is traditional not contemporary. Vines are a bad idea and messy for next to the garage area. Keep the entry clean and simple with as suggested earlier....seasonal wreaths and pots that match and attractive. As in the above photo you can see that if you plant shrubs next to the garage keep them small and simple not intruding on the walkway. Seriously check out the roots on the tree to make sure they will not damage plumbing. If not then consider planting things like caladiums or begonias underneath in a simple bed. Your lot is not giant so don’t overcrowd but do add some nice small shrubs and plantings. Look at Home Town redos to see how they complimented the houses or Joanna Gaines makeovers. i seriously planted my last house out front but we lived on a hill of 7 levels almost an acre difficult to mow so we removed grass and planted gardens with a walkway because the house was bland and the front porch was its charm Plus a brick wall 10 feet high And it had to be deerproof. I still love my last yard and what we created but our ages won out so we have a more simple yard now. I will always miss my past two yards which we’re completely different but kept me interested and challenged me. This may be your starter home or forever home but stay true to the character of the house and simply give it a nice dress to put on. Think four seasons so that 6 months out of the yard there won’t be an empty yard with no interest. I still like small compact nandinas for the pop of color in winter and they are noninvasive like the taller variety and are a lovely shade of rich green when fertilized in warm weather. your area is hot and humid. When you are able go to the botanical garden in Dallas and check out the gardens For ideas. Try to enjoy your effort and not an “it will do“ philosophy.....remember, this is your home. Create something to be proud of. Signing off.......

  • Justin Samuel
    11 days ago

    I agree vines are messy when their on the brick itself but can look great on some sort of latter

  • Jonny Quest
    10 days ago

    Really do your research on vining plants. These are beautiful but do require maintenance. If you’re not an experienced gardener be wary. Doesn't mean you don’t add at some point but get some gardening experience under our belt. Do things in stages.


    Painting brick means you’ve created a costly maintenance item. If you don’t plan on staying in your home for long I would probably not paint it. I’d tone down color of brick using shutters, trim garage door & plantings.

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    10 days ago

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  • Stef B
    5 days ago

    There are so many good comments/advice! Here are some of my thoughts as a non-professional - maybe you can embrace the orange bricks. Possibly a muted shade of blue on the shutters would complement the orange. I wonder if the same or lighter shade of blue on the garage door would make it stand out less, and some other color to make the front door stand out (maybe rust, or a marine blue or ???). I love the windows, if you remove the straggly bushes it will show them off. You have a lovely house!

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