1nonlyj

Chased by a dog while running

Ocotillo
2 months ago

Today is the second time within the past 10 days that a dog has set out after me while I'm out running. Different areas, different dogs. The first one lunged at me while barking from a very long lead while its owner took up the center of the trail and talked on her cell phone. I was running off trail a good distance from her to get around her when the dog set out after me. I had no way of knowing how long the lead was or if I could outrun the animal. After performing a ridiculous sidestep maneuver to avoid the dog's lunge, the owner called out "sorrreeeee" as I went past. My adrenaline surged.
Today I ran on the opposite side of the street from a house where a woman was in the front yard on her phone. I did not see the large standard poodle until it was racing from the yard, tearing out after me and barking like mad. Again, I had to do a crazy jig to avoid physical contact with the dog, and again the owner stopped her cell conversation long enough to offer a halfhearted "sorrrreeeee" after she called her dog back into her yard. My fight/flight was in high gear, which might have actually improved my run. That said, I am furious when people fail to control their dogs and seem to think little of how a charging, barking, lunging dog impacts others.
I guess I'm going to start running with a canister of pepper spray. I will use it too.
For those who have encountered similar situations, what did you find was your best line of defense?

Comments (63)

  • nini804
    2 months ago

    I am a runner, and I have never been bitten, but have had a couple of little scares before. In each case, it was truly an accident, and other than a bit of heart rate acceleration, no harm was done.


    The most memorable situation was probably about 20 years ago, before we even had our kids. I was running really early before work (like 5 am) and about halfway through my run, this medium size dog started to run with me. I was annoyed, not scared, and back then I didn’t run with a phone so I didn’t know what I could do other than run my normal 6 mile route. We got to my house, and he sat on my porch, like, “what, are we done?” 😂 I got him some water, cursing under my breath bc my normal routine was all messed up and noticed he had a phone number on his collar. Called it, and after about 10 rings this sleepy young guy’s voice said, “Hello?” I said, “Do you have a dog?” He said, “OMG, yes! He somehow got the screen open and must have jumped out the window!”😳😂 We live in a college town, you see. It was a student’s dog, who was apparently contraband bc they aren’t supposed to have pets, lol.

  • Sheeisback_GW
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I actually read pepper spray wasn’t effective at stopping an aggressive dog. I can’t see how it wouldn’t be though. (I bought a gel version over a spray, btw.)

    I would first use noise, of course.

    Plus, while I don’t believe I would ever need to get away from a human, I want the people strength with me.

  • Related Discussions

    Temporary laminate floors while pets grow up?

    Q

    Comments (33)
    Sorry to say, but I'm in the Cynthia T-L. Cats have a sensor in their noses/back of the throat that detect the hormones in the urine! You can remove the "smell" all you want, the urine's chemical markers are still there to be detected. Cats are ALSO creatures of habit. Put those two, strong instincts together and you have a "cat area" in your room. There is no way to remove the "hormones" from a wood floor. There is also the possibility that it has soaked into the drywall, the trim, the under pad, the studs behind everything....you get the pic. It is quite possible that you could do all of the suggestions in this post and NONE of them will work...because you have (A) the hormones of cat, + (B) the habituated cat that likes that spot. You may have to wait until this old lovely has gone to the great mousing fields in the sky before you can bring in change. Even then, if the urine has hit other objects, you may still have a problem in that area if you bring in another cat. This is the nature of our beasts...sorry to say.
    ...See More

    Hardwood floors + a dog?

    Q

    Comments (335)
    So...DARK bamboo (probably caramelized = weakens the grass structure) = will show EVERY hair the dog sheds...and a few that he didn't. Scratches show more on a dark floor then they do on a natural floor...especially in sunlight. For a GOLDEN retriever you want a GOLDEN floor. Bamboo has issues if you are looking at a lower end product. Lower end means anything LESS than $7-$9/sf. Some of the best bamboo sells for $15/sf. There is a reason why the best is that expensive...it has better qualities. And ALL WOOD/wood like products scratch. Hardwood, bamboo, cork and many laminates will scratch. If you don't mind the scratches then go with something that can be refinished. If you are upset by scratches then you want to look at something like a vinyl plank...and STICK with the LIGHTER/natural colours. They are more forgiving with scratches AND dog hair. Again...GOLDEN dog hair = GOLDEN flooring = perfect camouflage.
    ...See More

    Are your dogs allowed on the couch/bed?

    Q

    Comments (226)
    Our German Shepherd seemed to have made that decision when he was quite young. He absolutely WILL NOT get on our bed. He acts as if it's a pit of snakes! As for the couch...sometimes he'll come over and climb up on the couch and put his head on my lap. It's so unexpected because he just doesn't do that, so I let him lay there a bit while I pet him and talk to him...he seems to really need the closeness at that moment, so why not give it to him!
    ...See More

    Floors - have dog, concrete slab foundation, vinyl plank?

    Q

    Comments (45)
    I think that the vinyl flooring market has come a long way (when I first moved into the townhome we sold over the summer, I had sheet vinyl in the kitchen and bathroom with carpet everywhere else - when it came time to update the flooring and repaint back in 2016 the main requirement was no more carpet on the open style no riser staircase and I wanted to use grey tones throughout.) especially in terms of LVP. It was installed by a fantastic flooring sale/install business that really earned my repeat business (Steven's carpet and flooring, SoCal area) especially in terms of trusting Fernando's years of hands-on knowledge and the high level of professionalism for himself that carried over to his installer crew. I can't tell you what it would be like to do the installation yourself but if you find an incredible flooring contractor (this alone is worth their weight in gold!) they will tell you honestly what will be the best flooring choice in your house based on more than just the cost.
    ...See More
  • ccrunneroklahoma
    2 months ago

    I’ve been followed and/or chased by dogs many times so I carry pepper spray. I recommend testing it because if it isn’t a powerful spray it may not reach the dog and stop it. One time I used it and the dog stopped and just tried to wipe it off on the grass so it wasn’t particularly bothered by it. Dog owners frequently let their dogs out early in the morning and don’t accompany them and since I had to run before going to work I’d frequently encounter them. Now that I go out later I don’t see as many unaccompanied dogs but when I do I have been known to scream at the owners that our town has a leash law. And they always reply ‘he won’t bite you’, but I don’t know your dog and your dog doesn’t know me. I don’t think there are any easy, effective solutions.

  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    I appreciate the comments here. I'm so sorry for those who have been bitten or otherwise experienced an animal scare. I was nipped years ago while running by a neighbor's Samoyed, and have been extremely leery of encountering a dog in that manner again. Oh, and once in Zihuatanejo, Mexico I stopped to try to pet a friendly seeming Chihuahua outside a shop, and the darn thing bit me fairly hard on the hand. Everyone within the vicinity turned away, as though to say "not MY dog." I spent the next few days of the trip fearing I'd contracted rabies, and now know I should have sought medical treatment... but that was then, and this is now.


    It's so much safer running indoors on my treadmill, and I do so most days. There's no substitute for a good run or walk outdoors on a glorious day though. Thankfully, most dogs and owners I've encountered have been no issue whatsoever. But it only takes one, right?

  • Tina Marie
    2 months ago

    What's the law in your area? In my county, there is a leash law and it's pretty well enforced. You rarely (and I do mean rarely) see a loose dog in our neighborhood/area. I do see two walkers that walk with big sticks. I know of one house that has an invisible fence and a dog that I could maybe see charging although I that is just a guess. I have never seen anything happen with it, never seen it cross it's fence, etc. I will say the owners are very careful with her and do not even let her out alone.


    I agree with Allison. As a dog lover, the pepper spray is not something I would use. I would definitely not spray a dog on a lead. I can see legalities there.


    I'm so sorry this has interfered with your running time! The thought of running makes my ta-tas hurt (LOL) but we enjoy our walks. I absolutely hate using a dreadmill but love walking outdoors. Is there another route you could take? Maybe even somewhere you could drive to and enjoy? I'll tell you a funny, near my parent's home there is a beautiful church cemetery. It's actually the church my family attended for several generations and we have family buried there (my mom and grandparents, along with others). The cemetery is almost park-like as there are many trees, nice paths, etc. There are people who walk the cemetery! It might sound creepy, but it's actually a beautiful, quiet place and there are also paths around the perimeter, so you do not have to walk right in among the graves. Also, due to age, there are some lovely old tombstones. I actually walked there a few times years ago with my dad.

  • Jinx
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I’m so mad on your behalf!! There is ZERO excuse for people not watching their pets! 😡

    Very glad you’re ok, though! ❤️

  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Tina, there was a very large cemetery within easy walking distance of our previous home and we frequently walked there, as did others. It was a parklike 130 acres and quite old (first burial was recorded in 1907), and a few of my relatives were laid to rest there. It was lovely, quiet, and contemplative.


    I don't think taking a different route is my solution. I wouldn't expect these encounters to happen again, and they could happen anywhere. This evening DH walked the same 3.25 mile route that I ran earlier today, and no sign of the standard poodle. I had never encountered it before today, so hopefully it was a one off. We shall see.


    I'm not sure what the leash laws are here, but I know we DO have them, of course. I would imagine that a dog in a yard might be a gray area, but the minute that dog bounds into the street after a jogger, that's a clear sign that it needs to be leashed while in the yard.


    I don't want to hurt a dog. I really don't. But I also realize a need for protection of some sort so that I could defend myself if the need arises.

  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Thank you, Jinx! ❤

  • jill302
    2 months ago

    So sorry you are having to deal with this. Pepper spray sounds like a good option. Perhaps start with JTB462’s tactic, if that does not work move to pepper spray. Sorry if the dog’s owner does not like it, It is more important that you are not mauled.

    Between multiple experiences with aggressive dogs and psycho people, sadly I no longer am comfortable walking alone. The only exception has been when I am visiting a friend’s gated community that has high dollar fines for dogs off leash or at the mall.

  • aok27502
    2 months ago

    I've quit running, but we've been bicycling a lot. In our new area, which is pretty rural, we've encountered a couple of angry dogs. One stopped us in our tracks, barking and snarling in the middle of the road. It was a large dog, probably more than 75 lbs. We screamed at it, and it eventually gave up.

    Last week I was riding on our rail trail, and came up behind a couple with two labs off leash. I slowed and asked if the dogs were friendly. "Oh sure, they're fine, and they have all their shots." Super, so when your dog rips a chunk out of my leg, at least I won't get rabies. That's comforting. 🙄

    I picked up a plastic water bottle at the thrift store. It has a pull top, and when squeezed it shoots pretty well. I'll probably put ammonia in it, and carry it in my water bottle holder. I hate to do that to an animal, but I hate being attacked, too.

  • Lukki Irish
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I get so frustrated with dog owners who refuse to be responsible with their dogs. I wouldn’t hesitate to report this last experience. It’s the only way law enforcement will know a dogs history should it be reported again or sadly bite. Or who knows, maybe it’s been a problem with others too.

    I’ve never been a fan of those retracting leashes (I actually really loath them) because many people don’t know how to use them respectfully. I’ve also always found it baffling that someone would have a dog when they aren’t interested in training them or keeping them properly restrained so it doesn’t scare or harm others.

    ETA: I drives me crazy when someone says, oh...don’t worry he/she doesn’t bite as the dog is barking in one’s face. So it’s ok for it to do that to someone????


  • Bestyears
    2 months ago

    Ida,

    Here's a video which pretty well illustrates my husband's experience once he began using the dog dazer. As the dog approached and he kept pressing it, somehow it just caused the dog to stop and then slink away. Dog Dazer


    Also, FYI, my son was also bitten by a dog once, on the back of the leg (while trying to protect his younger sister from this dog), and I took him to the pediatrician. The doctor explained to me that it is vitally important for anyone suffering a puncture wound (the typical dog bite) to get medical help. As he explained, unlike a scrape or other superficial wound, a puncture wound is like taking a hypodermic needle full of bacteria and injecting it straight into your bloodstream.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Ugh - glad you're OK.

    Skipped down to say I find those type of negligent/ignorant dog owners to be a menace!

    In some places, if a dog bites someone, it's required to be put down.

    And just being knocked down by a dog may cause a serious injury.

    I walk around my neighborhood and had a large, young dog come after me out of its driveway not that long ago. I stopped, it stopped, and then it suddenly lunged at me and smacked its mouth right into mine (blecchhh!) and left a pretty painful bruise on my thigh from its paw. The guy floundered around, trying to grab it, and gave me a halfhearted apology. I was nice about it, but said he was lucky the dog hadn't knocked me down and he should keep it on a leash in the future. FWIW, I was walking on the opposite side of the street, and the guy and his dog were in his driveway. Our neighborhood has no sidewalks.

  • Caroline Hamilton
    2 months ago

    I am an avid runner. I run several half and full marathons a year so I run outside almost daily and this has happened to me many many times. I am a huge dog lover (I have 2) and it drives me nuts that there are so many irresponsible dog owners out there. I usually just say NO really loudly and the dog usually goes away. Luckily I have never been bitten but it makes me so angry - I feel your pain.

  • olychick
    2 months ago

    Bestyears, that Dog Dazer looks AMAZING! I'm not a runner, but really hate being approached by strange dogs even while walking. That will make a great gift for the runners and bikers in my life!

  • nini804
    2 months ago

    I just read this today...terrifying!

    https://apple.news/AH5PC7Ji2SW-coEgmJlQp1w


  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    OMG. Poor, sweet little Milo. That story is just horrifying!

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    2 months ago

    Oh nini- what a horrible story! I could barely finish reading it and am glad the author's dog survived.

    It reminded me of a similar problem here in our neighborhood. Some folks on nextdoor brought it up - a family has a couple of apparently vicious dogs like that, and their kid and the mom couldn't restrain them when they went after someone else's dog, and luckily the targets of the attack escaped unharmed. The family are repeat offenders it seems, and don't seem interested in doing anything to change.

  • terezosa / terriks
    2 months ago

    I couldn't read the LA Times story without a subscription.

  • Lukki Irish
    2 months ago

    I couldn’t even finish reading that article it’s so upsetting. A few years ago, my dog was attacked by a Pit mix while at the doggie day care. The owner had told the facility it was socialized but my dog wasn’t even interacting with it when it attacked her. I was so upset. You’d think that the threat of a law suit would be a motivating factor for controlling the freedoms we allow our animals to have (it sure was with me) but it seemingly isn’t.

  • patriceny
    2 months ago

    Don't even get me going on dogs attacking other dogs, and owners not caring.

    I too have had a very disturbing incident with a loose pit bull coming after me and my tiny dog, and got to experience first hand how much some dog owners just don't freaking care. I can't stress that enough - some dog owners own dangerous dogs for some perceived prestige or something, and they literally do not care if your dog gets hurt.

    It goes to the heart of why some people cause problems. They just don't care. Law suits are not always a motivating factor, potential financial damages are not always a motivating factor - some people are just disappointing and or malevolent forces and they don't care how much their action (or inaction) hurts you.


  • pudgeder
    2 months ago

    OMG what an awful experience! I don't know how Milo's owner couldn't have demanded the dogs be put down. That day, Milo -- the next? What if it is a baby in a stroller or toddling along w/the parents? Absolutely horrific!


  • pudgeder
    2 months ago

    Our across the street neighbors have 2 HUGE pitties. I mean huge! The head of one of them is nearly as big a the steering wheel of our pick up. And these neighbors have NO fence. They will put these harnesses on them and then chain them outside, and then they go back in the house.

    They only put them outside one at a time. Guess that's a blessing.

    These dogs will pull out of the harnesses. And run rampant through the neighborhood. Once when I was driving home, they were chasing some kids on bikes. I was able to put my vehicle between the dogs & the kids, rolled the windows down and told the kids to get in my car. Then I drove them home. Scared us all!

    Another time one of them got loose and was behind our house barking at our dogs, an 8 lb morkie and 10lb mini-dachshund. At any given moment I expected that pit to leap over the fence, it wouldn't have taken much effort. I managed to get our dogs inside about the time the owner pulled up in our driveway to retrieve their dog. I was so angry!! I yelled at them -- "You have GOT to DO SOMETHING to keep your dogs under control!"

    If that happens again, I'm not too sure that Hubs won't take care of them himself. God forbid they take off after one of the many children in our neighborhood.

  • Lukki Irish
    2 months ago

    I read reports all the time in the news about pitt bulls in Detroit attacking kids and dogs, mail people, it’s crazy. You’re right Patriceny, a lot of people just don’t care about others and in recent years, that number has seemingly grown.

  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    We don't even let our cats, which are strictly indoor pets, out in the open when guests come over. Unless someone specifically asks to see them, they will be sequestered upstairs in a spare bedroom where they cannot walk on, jump on, brush against, or merely sit in the corner giving the stink eye to, our guests. Responsible pet ownership means you consider that not everyone loves your pet as you do, and act accordingly by not inflicting it on others. Truth be told, I don't even want to be slobbered on by a friendly dog I might encounter in public, and appreciate it when owners do not make the assumption that I think their dog is as adorable as they do. I've had my pants gunked up disgustingly by a happy tailwagger who just wanted to show me some love too many times to count. Recently a woman walked down our front sidewalk when I was out watering the plant on the porch and stopped to chat. Her obviously elderly and docile big dog was on a long lead, and he strolled up to where I was and proceeded to nose around in my crotch during the few minutes that she and I talked. She just let him. I had to go inside and change pants.

  • nini804
    2 months ago

    Lukki, I can’t believe your doggie day care let a dog like that in the program! I wanted to get my 17 yo daughter’s puppy set up at day care, and she had to spend a day there getting her temperament and behaviors analyzed. She received a comprehensive report card which was explained to me when I picked her up (she got all greens! In the comments it said she was “an enthusiastic and friendly player!” 😊😂) They absolutely do not allow any dogs that have even a trace of aggression. I am so sorry that happened to you!

  • patriceny
    2 months ago

    I don't go to free range dog parks for just that reason. I know some people love them. I also know of some horrific attacks in dog parks and there is zero chance I'd take any dog I loved to an off leash dog park.

    Supervised doggy daycare is presumably a safer option.

    I don't let my dogs jump on people. Or nose around in their crotch. ;) It amazes me how oblivious some people can be about the actions of beings who are supposed to be under their control, be they 2 or 4 footed beings. Kids and animals are a lot of work to raise. Free range kids or animals tend to cause problems. Some people just don't care enough to do anything about it.

  • Lukki Irish
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Nini, I couldn’t believe it either. Apparently this was the dogs first day and he was going through the same process you laid out. It had been separated and was introduced to the larger pen an hour or so before he got her. She’s an 80lb lab and he took her by the back of her neck and ripped the skin open before they could get it off of her. Unbeknown to me, I found out much later that she was being used by the staff to introduce dogs to the facility, frequently. They’d put her alone in the pen with new dogs to help keep them calm (which is a whole nother story) because as they say, she’s ideally socialized, so it’s not like she provoked it. The vet said it got her pretty good, but the dog didn’t seem phased, I was more upset than she was...go figure!

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    2 months ago

    Btw, pits are wonderful dogs but it's the type of owners that are drawn to the reputation of the pit that is the problem.

    My pittie mix has the best behavior and personality of any dog I have encountered.

  • Bestyears
    2 months ago

    There has always been a breed to blame. Remember when it was dobermans? And then rottweilers? We don't hear so much about those anymore. Meanwhile, people are not held accountable. Communities have leash laws but people continuously get 'verbal warnings.' People can't be bothered to chip their pets, which can result in hundreds or thousands of dollars expended by the community rounding up the pet, caring for it, trying to locate the owner, adopting it out eventually, etc. Why is this allowed? It's nonsense. Neuter your pet, chip your pet, and follow your local ordinances. It isn't that hard. And to the community officers -start enforcing the laws that are already on the books.

  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    2 months ago

    It is so sad for the dogs of these terrible owners. They are helpless, and at the mercy of their human's willingness to socialize them properly.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I think, like the writer of that LATimes article, some people don't want to report vicious dogs to authorities. Maybe because they don't want to be responsible if the dogs wind up being euthanized?

    The local problem dogs issue created a fight on nextdoor with some people saying 'what's the big deal?' and others pointing out it wasn't the first time and the dogs were terrorizing the neighborhood.

  • pricklypearcactus
    2 months ago

    I am so sorry you went through this. I have been a runner (fun / fitness, not competitive) for probably close to 20 years. I also am a dog lover and own a 70lb white swiss shepherd who is my current running companion. (Previously owned a 90lb german shepherd who was my former running companion.) I cannot even begin to count the number of dogs that have chased, menaced, and even attacked myself and my dog(s). I've been lucky to never be bitten seriously (only a minor nip to the ankles) though I've had dogs bite my previous dog and try to bite my current dog.

    I adore dogs and have a deep anger towards irresponsible owners who put their neighbors and their dog(s) in danger by not containing their dogs. Now, I live in the suburbs so this might be a different experience than those living in the country. But if you live in a neighborhood, you must keep your dog contained or in control on a leash with an adult human being on the other end. It's the only way to keep your dog safe and to keep your neighborhood safe. Dogs that are allowed to charge and reach someone are reinforcing their own bad behavior and it will be even more difficult to train it out of them.

    Only recently I had a pair of dogs charge my dog and myself across the street while the owner saw me approaching and did nothing to secure his dogs. He then said "they're getting better" after yelling "no" at the dogs and "come" and the dogs completely ignored him. Thankfully my sweet dog greeted the dogs and was able to be friendly with them. After that I had a massive dog on leash charge us because the owner let her little daughter who was significantly outweighed by the dog hold the leash. Not smart.

    If you can read the charging dog's body language, sometimes that can give you a clue how to respond. If the dog appears to be friendly, sometimes it pays to try to be friendly and give the dog a chipper "hi pup!" and stop running. Do not try to pet the dog or even bring your hand near it because you don't know if the dog will nip. But you might be able to diffuse the situation. If the dog's behavior does not appear friendly but more aggressive, I usually still stop running, try to get my dog safely behind me (if possible) and make myself as large as possible while yelling (as deep as my female voice will go) "NO! STOP!" and "Go home!" If the dog is very small you might be able to outrun it, but if the dog is 50lb or bigger, chances are the dog is going to be far faster than you are and you'd do better to walk to reduce your appearance as prey. I do carry pepper spray but somehow when the adrenaline is pumping, I've never been able to remembered to draw it.

    I've had some terrifying encounters where I thought I was going to be mauled and have been lucky to get away. One memorable time a snarling dog cornered me (alone, without my dog) and I couldn't get away. Every direction I turned the dog would dart around and block me with teeth bared and growling. I eventually got away when the dog heard something more interesting elsewhere in the neighborhood and took off. This was what prompted me to start carrying pepper spray.

    Good luck with your running. Get to know what times are safer in your neighborhood and good luck out there! I hope you won't give up running because it's such a wonderful sport to enjoy.

  • Caroline Hamilton
    2 months ago

    So sorry to all of you whose dogs have been attacked by other dogs! The very first week I brought my sweet rescue lab home and took him for a walk he was attacked by my neighbors pitbull. I had to literally pull the other dog off of mine before his owner came running out and said "sorry he does that sometimes." Thankfully he did not break skin! Since then my dog has been terrified of other dogs and is on high alert when we walk through the neighborhood. It really is a shame considering he is a sweet dog with not one aggressive bone in his body.

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    2 months ago

    I live in the country and it is still hard to find a place to walk where there are no roaming dogs.Mine are always leashed and I typically drive 25 minutes to the state botanical gardens where we can have a lovely walk and know all dogs must be leashed. Although that's not a daily walk.

    One of my dogs is new (not the one pictured above), had her for 8 months and through heartworm treatment and recently have seen some aggression towards other dogs. I am meeting a trainer tonight for our first session.

  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Thanks again to all who have chimed in here. It helps to have commiseration, although I'm not sure what it is about "misery loving company" in this situation that feels good ... but perhaps you know what I mean.


    I appreciate the recommendations for what to carry and how to carry myself in the event of another aggressive dog encounter. I am researching my options and will arrive at a solution soon that enables me to feel at least somewhat safer out there.

  • Lv_r_Golden
    2 months ago

    We have a whistle, that sounds terrible, that our kids sent after they heard coyotes had been following DH (225lb) and 85lb Golden Retriever on their walks (and were within very, very few feet when they were alerted by neighbors who noticed from their yards.......not sure what the coyotes were thinking, maybe their packs were waiting nearby to join in the attack but it happened twice this summer in broad daylight. The whistle is bright orange plastic and somewhat bigger than the standard silver type. It is very shrill and might scare off the chasing dogs but not be cumbersome to carry while running. Our dog leaves the room when DH decides to whistle short bursts inside (thinking it is amusing- its not).....it came from Amazon (of course).

    I also have pepper spray, never used it but got it when a car full of young guys pulled up next to me and jumped out to block the sidewalk......I sprinted off without incident but suddenly felt vulnerable. I think it would be harder to grab and spray quickly, though it was on a lanyard.

  • pricklypearcactus
    2 months ago

    @Lv_r_Golden I had a similar encounter once with a carload of young men who pulled up next to me in my suburban neighborhood (without a dog at the time) and got out started harassing me. It was absolutely terrifying. Not sure what it says about me that after this I continue to run several times each week..

  • lyfia
    last month

    Sorry for bringing this up again, but someone told me about it after I got bit yesterday while out running. I asked my friends on Facebook what they recommended and a friend who is also a sheriff's deputy suggested pepper spray. He said it works well and he's had to use it in the line of duty. Said you step aside to avoid blow-back based on wind direction.


    Now my question is does anyone know if any pepper spray can be used?


    I really don't want to hurt the dog more than needed as it is really the owners fault for letting it run loose. Seems like something that works well on people as well would be in my best interest as I run in a rural neighborhood with large lots and not a single person came out when I screamed after getting bit. I had to call my husband to come and get me as it was in the leg and hurt to even walk with full puncture wound. So likely if a person decided to attack me it wouldn't be good for me.


    Something like this may not be good for a dog, but might be good if a person attacked. Hence my question. I like the hand strap and that it is at the ready.

    https://www.amazon.com/SABRE-ADVANCED-Pepper-Runners-Adjustable/dp/B089Z3B65W

  • Ocotillo
    Original Author
    last month

    Gosh, lyfia, I'm so sorry you were bit! How are you feeling today? Any idea who the dog belongs to?

  • maddielee
    last month

    @lyfia

    did you find the dog’s owner?


    It’s Important you have a doctor check out your bite. Rabies is still a thing, and other infections from dog bites can be dangerous.

  • Bestyears
    last month

    Oh, I'm so sorry to hear that. I don't know if you've had medical treatment, but when my son was bit, his doctor explained that it was imperative because a puncture wound is similar to injecting a hypodermic needle full of bacteria into your bloodstream. Very different than other types of injuries in that regard. Also, your local animal control should be told.

  • gsciencechick
    last month

    Yes, call animal control. When MIL was bit by a neighbor's dog last fall, they took it very seriously and followed up with both her and the owner. Here, if you seek medical attention for a bite, they are required to report it to animal control.

  • gsciencechick
    last month

    Yes, call animal control. When MIL was bit by a neighbor's dog last fall, they took it very seriously and followed up with both her and the owner. Here, if you seek medical attention for a bite, they are required to report it to animal control.

  • dedtired
    last month

    Oh how scary! It should definitely be reported because there may be other companies,wings against the dog. Go get a tetanus shot!

    After a couple run-ins with dogs while on walks I ordered pepper spray meant for use on dogs. It mostly shocks and irritates them, no long term harm except perhaps a healthy respect for humans.

  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    last month

    How horrifying! I hope you are feeling better and that the authorities are on this case.

  • OutsidePlaying
    last month

    So sorry this happened to you. Just echoing my sentiments and to also say you should seek medical attention and call animal control about this dog. The dog needs to be investigated. I have no sympathy for the owners of dogs like this. Can you even imagine if a small child had been involved what might have happened?

  • Lukki Irish
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Wow, I’m so sorry, that must have been so scary. I hope you went to the doctors, punctures can get infected pretty easily. Also, I realize it’s not the dogs fault and at this moment you may not know how you want to proceed, but having it documented by both a medical professional and animal control is in your best interest (and others if it were to happen again). That said, it’s hard to imagine that it’s the first time this dog has done this. Even if it was, I’d be concerned someone else could get hurt even worse. The owners lack of supervision and/or response is mind blowing.


  • lyfia
    last month

    Thank you everyone. Doing much better today. Still hurts when touched or when taking any steps up/down or first getting up from laying/sitting to move, and can't sleep on that side, but at least I finally got some sleep last night sleeping on my other side (not the preferred one). I went to the doctor within a few hours of it happening and got a Tetanus, antibiotics, and a cleaning of the wound. I also reported it to the Sheriff's office which told me a puncture bite should always be reported and the dog was picked up by a deputy and put into quarantine at a local vet for 10 days (paid for by the owner) and his shot records were verified so at least I don't have to worry about rabies.


    I do want to get some pepper spray that would be effective on humans as well since you never know there either, but don't want it to kill a dog either. Usually I only encounter deer, bunnies, and sometimes the school bus and a home health aide, so haven't had a reason to worry before, but now I'm in full protect mode. If I have to carry something I need it to be effective for all threats.

  • OutsidePlaying
    last month

    Good to hear you are doing ok. I am glad the dog is quarantined, and even though it has had the shots, it’s the right thing to do.

    Yes, I would get pepper spray. I always carried it with me when running and still do on walks. We are in a rural area, and I never know what I will encounter.