Shop Products
Houzz Logo Print
lagirl

HELP! Does anyone know about textured thermofused-melamine??

12 years ago
I am re-doing my kitchen and I fell in love with a driftwood look from poggenpohl. I can't afford it so am getting bids for a look that is inspired by it. I have gotten bids for stained wood veneer, thermafoil and thermofused-melamine (tfm)-I like the tfm color best. The company said tfm is very popular for kitchens in Europe. (A bid I got from an italian company also used tfm). But a local cabinet maker said he doesn't use it cuz it's too thin and not durable. Is thermofused-melamine a high quality material to use for an upscale kitchen or is thermafoil better for a European look.

Comments (12)

  • 12 years ago
    That's a great question. I hope someone has some answers for you!
  • 12 years ago
    Thank you Toni! I got a quote from poggenpohl for beautiful cabinetry and from an italian company and both were for thermafused melamine. I understand the thermafused material has only recently come to the US although its been used for several years in Europe for cabinet doors. I got a quote from a local company for thermafused melamine and the door material looked extremely similar to the poggenpohl so I was very excited. BUT it is not cheap-almost as much as wood veneer. The owner of the company said it is great stuff--I did try to scratch the sample door with my key and no way! The light scratch just vanished when I wiped it. My question is: is wood veneer much "nicer"? I love the look of the TFM and am getting all German hinges and bifolds so I think it is going to be so similar to poggenpohl but much cheaper. Any thoughts? I don't want to make the wrong choice...THANK YOU!
  • PRO
    12 years ago
    I do not think the veneer is much "nicer" at all. I am a fan of the laminated products. A wood veneer is a thin sheet of wood, subject to liquids, moisture, scratches and really cannot be refinished either. I think you are making a great choice with the locally manufactured poggenpohl style.It seems great for the look, durability, your pockets and the local economy. ...and you are welcome!
  • 12 years ago
    You are terrific! Thanks so much for setting my mind at ease! I can't wait for my new kitchen :)
  • PRO
    12 years ago
    Thank you!!!!
  • 12 years ago
    Thermally fused melamine has been around since at least the 80's, just not in the color selecton it is available in now. There are a number of door manufacturers that make doors in the colors you are talking about, including in thermofoil. Companies like Northern Contours, Doormark, Thermoform of America, etc. can help you find a company that uses their doors and will make the cabinets custom for your kitchen.
  • PRO
    10 years ago
    The new line from Bentwood Luxury Kitchens, "Harmoni" offers a similar product for considerably less than the European imports. Check it out at harmonikitchens.com
  • 9 years ago

    Is themally fused melamine the same thing as thermofoil? Do you need heat shields when using it?


  • 6 years ago

    Thermofused Melamine if purchased from the right supplier can be More durable, more cost effective and Environmentally friendly alternative to HardWood. Dont confuse with MDF board, or Laminate. These are different products. High end European Cabinet manufactures have been using for years. There is some good info on this blog post. https://nwpsocal.com/blog/stevenswood-thermofused-tfl/

  • PRO
    6 years ago

    Yes there is a wide range in quality so be careful, but if its high quality its more durable and affordable than traditional hardwood.

  • PRO
    5 years ago

    If your cabinetry professional is able to source different brands locally you're going to have some extremely attractive color/grain combinations to consider. You'll also enjoy color/pattern consistency, allowing you to bookmatch and/or order an exact replacement should a problem arise (although bookmatching makes that a more costly proposition).


    Also, I agree with what others above have said. This category of products is arguably more durable that wood veneers, and anyone that tells you "but you can sand and refinish the damage if it's wood" isn't being practical. Your're not going to sand/refinish damage or replace a component years later and be happy with the consistency.


    As a professional, I wouldn't hesitate to use TFL when remodeling my own home.