canishel

Callicarpa americana or bodinieri?

canishel
2 years ago
last modified: 2 years ago

This plant was sold as americana, but the leaves are smaller than searched descriptions. The berries are that gorgeous magenta-purple. This plant gets morning and early afternoon sun. Lots of seedlings. Zone 6b, east TN.

Thanks.






Comments (7)

  • carol23_gw
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Here is a link that may help. I have grown the native which has a much coarser appearance. The non-native beautyberry is one I'm attempting to eradicate due to its seeding around heavily.

    Dirr's book states that bodinieri is rarely cultivated in the US. C. dichotoma is much more prevalent as well as japonica. On C. americana he writes " leaves are 3 1/2" to 6" long and 1/2 as wide. leaves are pubescent above, tomentose and glandular below , petiole is 1/2 to 1" long.

    You might take a couple of leaves from your plant ( in a ziplock bag with a little moisture inside ) to a reliable plant nursery and compare with their stock of the native species. Use magnification for the leaf reverse to see if you can differentiate.

    https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CAAM2

  • canishel
    Original Author
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Part 1. My post was too long, so I'm trying more than one part response.

    I want this plant to be native... I know it's not dichotoma.

    The leaf petioles and underside veins and twigs are pubescent, leaf upper surface pubescence not visible under 8x magnification. I can't feel the leaf texture, other than softness, because of callouses on my fingers.Based on fall leaf color and berry clustering, I think it's americana. But the leaf size and possible lack of hairs make me think it might be something else.

    Please argue with me. I don't want non-native shrubs becoming invasive.

    Per NC State Extension (https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/category/all/),

    bodinieri has

    Foliage:

    Opposite, simple, dull, dark green leaves; 2-5 in. long; slightly pubescent below; purplish fall color

    Flower:

    1-1.5 in. cyme of lilac-pink flowers on new growth; open cluster of glossy, bluish lilac fruit; does not last as well as other Callicarpa spp.

    and japonica has

    Foliage:

    Opposite, simple,
    medium blue-green leaves; 1-5 in. long; pale yellow-green to pinkish lavender
    fall color

    Flower:

    1-1.5 in. cluster of
    non-showy pink or white flowers in midsummer on new growth; 1-1.5 in. loose,
    open clusters of shiny, violet to metallic purple berries in fall

  • canishel
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Part 2

    and americana has

    Foliage:

    The leaves of the beautyberry are opposite, simple, medium
    green. They have 3-6 in. long, loose, open stems. The leaves turn a
    yellow-green fall color.

    Flower:

    Callicarpa americana, commonly called beautyberry, is a loose
    open shrub valued for its spectacular fruits. The relatively insignificant
    flowers develop into prolific bright violet to magenta berry-like drupes which
    encircle the stem. These fruits remain attractive for a long time although they
    are generally gone before severe winter weather.

    My has magenta-ish berries, tightly clustered, not bluish,leaves
    turn yellow. Argument for americana. But the photos on NC website has
    berries that might be as tight as those on my plant.

    Thanks.



  • Embothrium
    2 years ago

    >Dirr's book states that bodinieri is rarely cultivated in the US<

    Out here the dominant one in commerce by far has been C. bodinieri var. giraldii 'Profusion'. With 28 western nurseries indicating they were offering it when a print version plant finder was compiled in 2003.

    canishel thanked Embothrium
  • Embothrium
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    And I see this contemporary treatment considers giraldii a separate species so maybe that is what Dirr was referring to, there being very little bodinieri left around if and when it gets split from giraldii:

    This species is often confused with Callicarpa giraldii which differs by its yellow glands

    http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200019237

  • canishel
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Thanks for posting the link.

    My comments got too long to include a copy-and-paste.